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Butterflies

SCIENCE
May 13, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The number of butterflies migrating through California has fallen to nearly a 40-year low as populations already hurt by habitat loss and climate change encountered a cold, wet spring, researchers said. "Some of them were already in decline, but this weather really added insult to injury, kicking them when they were down," said Arthur Shapiro, a UC Davis entomologist.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2004 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
Two of Southern California's rarest butterflies, the tiny Hermes copper and Thorne's hairstreak, could become the first known species in the state to be driven into extinction after the sweeping autumn wildfires. The butterflies are among two dozen endangered and threatened species that researchers are tracking after the devastating blazes, which scorched more than 740,000 acres and destroyed thousands of homes. Endangered gnatcatcher birds could have a difficult time finding food this year.
MAGAZINE
August 1, 2004 | Susan Heeger
Instead of anguishing over a chewed garden plant, Trish and Chris Meyer consider the tattered leaves a snack for a butterfly-in-the-making. While most gardeners measure success in dozens of roses or baskets of lettuce, the Sherman Oaks couple tote up munched plants and worry about running short. Their greenhouse, which Chris built from a kit, is full of seedlings that can be whisked in to fill gaps in the garden, lest one caterpillar go hungry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1999 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A circle of children crouched around naturalist Sandra Huwe as she held a leaf-filled glass jar--the makeshift display case for a solitary butterfly egg the size of a grain of sand. In another jar, a black and orange caterpillar snacked on a plant and in a third, a chrysalis dangled from a leaf. The children, third-graders at Harold Ambuehl Elementary School in San Juan Capistrano, were planting a butterfly garden Thursday morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1997 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They're here in droves this year--the monarch butterflies, those intrepid travelers that laze away the winter months at select coastal spots in Ventura County and elsewhere. The last few years have been rather ho-hum for butterfly fans. But this year, maybe because of El Nino-driven weather conditions, a much-larger-than-usual migration of the orange- and black-winged beauties has flown in. You've probably already spotted them fluttering about.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1995 | DEBRA CANO
Former Mayor Norma Brandel Gibbs' motto is "You can fly, but that cocoon has to go." It seems fitting, then, that on Saturday--her 70th birthday--the city will dedicate to her its new "butterfly park" with groves of eucalyptus trees intended to provide shelter for endangered monarch butterflies. The dedication will feature the unveiling of a colorful, 35-foot-wide mosaic depicting the distinctive orange and black butterflies in flight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1987 | TIM WATERS, Times Staff Writer
A state agency Wednesday agreed to let Los Angeles International Airport destroy weeds that are threatening an endangered butterfly's food supply. Meeting in San Francisco, the California Coastal Commission voted to allow the airport to use herbicides on a limited basis on the so-called Airport Dunes west of the airport. Non-native vegetation is thriving on the dunes and threatens to squeeze out a form of wild buckwheat that serves as food for the endangered El Segundo blue butterfly.
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The long-held notion that the tasty viceroy butterfly escapes being eaten by birds by mimicking the coloration of foul-tasting monarch and queen butterflies has been overturned by two Florida biologists who tested the century-old belief experimentally. They report in today's edition of the British journal Nature that they tore the wings off all three types of butterflies and fed their bodies to red-winged blackbirds for a novel taste test.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1995 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Environmentalist Jon Earl and a cadre of other volunteers spent thousands of backbreaking hours at a Los Angeles International Airport-owned nature preserve plucking out plants that threaten the endangered El Segundo blue butterfly. That is why Earl was so dismayed recently to see some of the very same orange and purple blooms that he and others worked so hard to remove blossoming just across the street on other LAX property.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Southern California butterflies on the brink of extinction have been added to the federal list of endangered species, government officials announced Thursday. The Quino checkerspot, a colorful orange-toned creature once ranked among the most abundant butterflies in Orange and Los Angeles counties and neighboring areas. Today, its population has shrunk to only seven known populations on the distant fringes of metropolitan Southern California.
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