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Butterflies

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Butterflies saved Arthur Bonner. He'll tell you that. He'll tell you he needed saving, too. And since many of the butterflies that inadvertently rescued the convicted felon and former gang member are themselves endangered, it is perhaps something of a psychic debt he is repaying at a makeshift biology lab in San Pedro.
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NEWS
May 16, 1996 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Weissmann's quest to teach children about the importance of insects once meant traveling to rural schools across Colorado with a cockroach in his shirt pocket and boxfuls of bugs in the backseat of an old Volkswagen Super Beetle. "When the car didn't break down at 2 a.m. on a back road, it was a great job," recalled the 35-year-old entomologist. "In three years, me and my bugmobile taught thousands of kids to appreciate insects and not squish them."
NEWS
February 29, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a yearly ritual dating to prehistoric times, millions of monarch butterflies returned to this mountain forest last fall, surviving one of the world's great animal migrations--a 3,000-mile journey fraught with storms, starvation and other dangers. Now the question is: Will they survive the students of Actopan grammar school? "I've got a live one!" yelped Oscar Dali, 8, stuffing an orange-and-black monarch into a glass jar on a recent morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Flight Behavior A novel Barbara Kingsolver Harper: 436 pp., $28.99 Strange things are happening in Appalachia. The natural world as we know it is coming to an end, overheated by human greed. "Global warming" is a dangerously loaded expression in the rural, Republican-loving, God-fearing Tennessee of Barbara Kingsolver's didactic and preachy new novel, "Flight Behavior. " The people of the fictional Feathertown have been taught by talk radio that it's a big-city scam concocted by Al Gore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials on Monday cleared a key roadblock to the civilian use of surplus Navy housing in the harbor area by announcing a plan to protect the endangered Palos Verdes blue butterflies that live on the property. "It's a win for the blue butterfly and a win for the community," said Rep. Jane Harman (D-Torrance), who worked on the plan. "The bottom line is that the reuse proposal remains intact and there will be habitat set aside on adjacent Navy property."
BUSINESS
November 2, 1999 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing protests around the world against genetically modified foods, the biotech industry is responding by presenting new evidence that such crops are not harmful to the environment. Researchers meeting in Chicago today are saying that the monarch butterfly, a symbol for the environmental dangers of genetically modified crops, is unlikely to be threatened by pollen from widely used varieties of genetically engineered corn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After three long years of community meetings, furious lobbying and heated debates, officials thought they finally were ready to start development on surplus Navy land in San Pedro and Harbor City. Two adjacent parcels were to be transformed into a shining research facility for Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, an elite private school and dormitories for another school, plus housing for homeless and low-income families. But that was before a tiny blue butterfly fluttered into the picture.
NEWS
May 11, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is one of Southern California's great environmental mysteries. An orange-and-black butterfly, once so commonplace as to be ignored by collectors, is now on the verge of disappearing. No one knows why the Quino checkerspot is becoming extinct, or how to save it. Tougher still is how and where to track it down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1990 | TIM WATERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Environmentalists scored a major victory Friday when Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley and other key city officials announced an agreement to preserve one of the last sections of Southern California's once-extensive coastal sand dune system. The land, 200 acres west of Los Angeles International Airport, is best known as a habitat for the endangered El Segundo blue butterfly. It is a remnant of a dune system that once stretched from Point Conception, above Santa Barbara, south to Mexico.
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