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Butterflies

BUSINESS
November 2, 1999 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing protests around the world against genetically modified foods, the biotech industry is responding by presenting new evidence that such crops are not harmful to the environment. Researchers meeting in Chicago today are saying that the monarch butterfly, a symbol for the environmental dangers of genetically modified crops, is unlikely to be threatened by pollen from widely used varieties of genetically engineered corn.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After three long years of community meetings, furious lobbying and heated debates, officials thought they finally were ready to start development on surplus Navy land in San Pedro and Harbor City. Two adjacent parcels were to be transformed into a shining research facility for Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, an elite private school and dormitories for another school, plus housing for homeless and low-income families. But that was before a tiny blue butterfly fluttered into the picture.
NEWS
May 11, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is one of Southern California's great environmental mysteries. An orange-and-black butterfly, once so commonplace as to be ignored by collectors, is now on the verge of disappearing. No one knows why the Quino checkerspot is becoming extinct, or how to save it. Tougher still is how and where to track it down.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1997 | KARREN MILLS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
David Bohlken needs 750 pounds of milkweed a day, hand harvested and cleaned, to feed his livestock. After his animals mature, the diet changes to watermelon. Bohlken is a butterfly farmer. His business is among about half a dozen in the United States that raise and sell butterflies to the growing number of butterfly gardens, zoos and educational exhibits around the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1990 | TIM WATERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Environmentalists scored a major victory Friday when Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley and other key city officials announced an agreement to preserve one of the last sections of Southern California's once-extensive coastal sand dune system. The land, 200 acres west of Los Angeles International Airport, is best known as a habitat for the endangered El Segundo blue butterfly. It is a remnant of a dune system that once stretched from Point Conception, above Santa Barbara, south to Mexico.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Flight Behavior A novel Barbara Kingsolver Harper: 436 pp., $28.99 Strange things are happening in Appalachia. The natural world as we know it is coming to an end, overheated by human greed. "Global warming" is a dangerously loaded expression in the rural, Republican-loving, God-fearing Tennessee of Barbara Kingsolver's didactic and preachy new novel, "Flight Behavior. " The people of the fictional Feathertown have been taught by talk radio that it's a big-city scam concocted by Al Gore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1997 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A colorful, checkered butterfly that once ranked among the most abundant butterflies in Orange County is now so threatened that it is being granted protection under the federal Endangered Species Act. The Quino checkerspot is one of two Southern California butterflies on the brink of extinction that have been added to the federal list of endangered species, federal officials announced Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hikers moved single file, binoculars and nets held in readiness, scanning the sea of sage scrub in search of butterflies. Curiously, few fluttered above the veritable feast of host plants--the flowering deer weed, monkey flower, buckwheat--that the rainy winter has brought to the rolling wilderness of southern Orange County. With all these flowers for the taking, some wondered, where are the butterflies to feed on them? Then news of a find travels down the line. "Red admiral!"
NEWS
December 16, 2001 | DEEPTI HAJELA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The brown butterfly seemed to like its resting place--on Gabe Heafitz's shirt. It crawled from one shoulder to the other and back, opening and closing its wings. As for Heafitz, he just stood calmly and let it wander, not even flinching as it approached his neck. After all, this butterfly--and its home, an oasis of quiet and calm in the sometimes still-frantic city--were the reasons he came to the American Museum of Natural History.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1991 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unusually large numbers of brown-and-yellow painted lady butterflies and green-black, white-lined sphinx moth caterpillars are swarming across Southern California deserts this spring--apparently feeding on the abundant plant life that sprouted after heavy March rains. The butterfly is often mistaken for the monarch. Although its coloring is similar to its better-known relative, it is about a third smaller.
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