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Butterflies

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1987 | TIM WATERS, Times Staff Writer
A state agency Wednesday agreed to let Los Angeles International Airport destroy weeds that are threatening an endangered butterfly's food supply. Meeting in San Francisco, the California Coastal Commission voted to allow the airport to use herbicides on a limited basis on the so-called Airport Dunes west of the airport. Non-native vegetation is thriving on the dunes and threatens to squeeze out a form of wild buckwheat that serves as food for the endangered El Segundo blue butterfly.
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NEWS
April 11, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The long-held notion that the tasty viceroy butterfly escapes being eaten by birds by mimicking the coloration of foul-tasting monarch and queen butterflies has been overturned by two Florida biologists who tested the century-old belief experimentally. They report in today's edition of the British journal Nature that they tore the wings off all three types of butterflies and fed their bodies to red-winged blackbirds for a novel taste test.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1995 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Environmentalist Jon Earl and a cadre of other volunteers spent thousands of backbreaking hours at a Los Angeles International Airport-owned nature preserve plucking out plants that threaten the endangered El Segundo blue butterfly. That is why Earl was so dismayed recently to see some of the very same orange and purple blooms that he and others worked so hard to remove blossoming just across the street on other LAX property.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Southern California butterflies on the brink of extinction have been added to the federal list of endangered species, government officials announced Thursday. The Quino checkerspot, a colorful orange-toned creature once ranked among the most abundant butterflies in Orange and Los Angeles counties and neighboring areas. Today, its population has shrunk to only seven known populations on the distant fringes of metropolitan Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Butterflies saved Arthur Bonner. He'll tell you that. He'll tell you he needed saving, too. And since many of the butterflies that inadvertently rescued the convicted felon and former gang member are themselves endangered, it is perhaps something of a psychic debt he is repaying at a makeshift biology lab in San Pedro.
NEWS
May 16, 1996 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Weissmann's quest to teach children about the importance of insects once meant traveling to rural schools across Colorado with a cockroach in his shirt pocket and boxfuls of bugs in the backseat of an old Volkswagen Super Beetle. "When the car didn't break down at 2 a.m. on a back road, it was a great job," recalled the 35-year-old entomologist. "In three years, me and my bugmobile taught thousands of kids to appreciate insects and not squish them."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Flight Behavior A novel Barbara Kingsolver Harper: 436 pp., $28.99 Strange things are happening in Appalachia. The natural world as we know it is coming to an end, overheated by human greed. "Global warming" is a dangerously loaded expression in the rural, Republican-loving, God-fearing Tennessee of Barbara Kingsolver's didactic and preachy new novel, "Flight Behavior. " The people of the fictional Feathertown have been taught by talk radio that it's a big-city scam concocted by Al Gore.
NEWS
February 29, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a yearly ritual dating to prehistoric times, millions of monarch butterflies returned to this mountain forest last fall, surviving one of the world's great animal migrations--a 3,000-mile journey fraught with storms, starvation and other dangers. Now the question is: Will they survive the students of Actopan grammar school? "I've got a live one!" yelped Oscar Dali, 8, stuffing an orange-and-black monarch into a glass jar on a recent morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials on Monday cleared a key roadblock to the civilian use of surplus Navy housing in the harbor area by announcing a plan to protect the endangered Palos Verdes blue butterflies that live on the property. "It's a win for the blue butterfly and a win for the community," said Rep. Jane Harman (D-Torrance), who worked on the plan. "The bottom line is that the reuse proposal remains intact and there will be habitat set aside on adjacent Navy property."
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