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Butternut Squash

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FOOD
February 23, 2013
  Total time: About 1 hour, plus cooling time for the chiles Servings: 6 to 8 2 poblano chiles 4 tablespoons (½ stick) butter 2 tablespoons oil 2 onions, diced 5 pounds butternut squash (2 medium, or 1 large), peeled, seeded and cut into ½-inch cubes 1/3 cup dry white wine 6 cups vegetable broth 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon New Mexico chile powder 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg Freshly ground black pepper 1/4 cup maple syrup, divided 1/2 cup raisins, coarsely chopped 6 to 8 pieces stale bread, preferably dark whole-grain, coarsely chopped 1 cup heavy cream Fine sea salt Tabasco sauce, optional 1 bunch green onions, thinly sliced on the bias 1. Roast the poblano chiles over high heat on a rack over a stove-top burner.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2013 | Mary MacVean
On Thanksgiving, the folks at Cafe Gratitude feel that everybody else has finally caught on. Plates are printed with the question that goes around many holiday tables: "What are you grateful for?" And each day, there is a question of the day -- a practice some find too precious for words and some take as a nudge to live mindfully. Thursday's question was the obvious: "What are you grateful for?" "We're supposed to be grateful 365 days a year," said Ryland Engelhart, one of the owners of the chain of Cafe Gratitude restaurants and the company's chief inspiration officer.
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FOOD
November 17, 2012 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: On our anniversary we had dinner at Flavor del Mar in San Diego County. I had an amazing butternut squash soup. I asked our waiter what the spices were. He said the chef did not give out information and recipes. I am wondering whether you can get me the recipe. I have tried various ones and cannot duplicate the flavors. My mouth waters just thinking about the soup. Lynn Whitehouse San Diego Dear Lynn: A perfect fall dish, roasted butternut squash is combined with onion and garlic and finished with rich cream in this soup, a touch of fragrant nutmeg and cinnamon rounding out the flavors.
NEWS
February 23, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
Have a little time to spare this weekend? In this week's section, I talk about the simple pleasures of a slow-simmered stew : "Unlike a typical weeknight dinner rushed to the table after a long day, stews are patient, as much about the sheer pleasure of cooking as the finished dish itself. It's the simple alchemy of time and ingredients layered in a pot to form something lush and rich, with a depth of flavor that cannot be duplicated with a shortcut. " While I'd argue that a good stew demands patience, not all of them require a lot of time.
NEWS
November 18, 2012
This week's Culinary SOS request comes from Lynn Whitehouse in San Diego: "On our anniversary we had dinner at Flavor del Mar in San Diego County. I had an amazing butternut squash soup. I asked our waiter what the spices were. He said the chef did not give out information and recipes. I am wondering whether you can get me the recipe. I have tried various ones and cannot duplicate the flavors. My mouth waters just thinking about the soup. " A perfect fall dish, roasted butternut squash is combined with onion and garlic and finished with rich cream in this soup, a touch of fragrant nutmeg and cinnamon rounding out the flavors.  Thanks, Lynn!
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
This soup from Times Food editor Russ Parsons tastes so complex your guests will be guessing what's in it. Really, though, it's not much more than squash itself, pureed. The final addition of vinegar is crucial, though, to keep the flavors focused. The recipe is demonstrated in the video at left by Russ Parsons. Creamy butternut squash soup is one of the favorite holiday recipes we've collected in our "Los Angeles Times Holiday Handbook. " The book shares more than 110 seasonal recipes to help you celebrate Thanksgiving, Hanukkah , Christmas and New Year's.
FOOD
December 8, 2011 | By Russ Parsons, Los Angeles Times
Most chef cookbooks fall into one of two categories. They're either faithful replications of what is served at their restaurants or they're what chefs imagine people at home might serve their families (they're not really sure because they rarely cook at home since they're, well, at work). Jean-Georges Vongerichten's "Home Cooking With Jean-Georges" is a notable exception. This is a terrific book, full of exactly the kinds of recipes I want from a master chef. There's no special equipment, no exotic ingredients, no long, elaborate preparations.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Jeff Spurrier
The tromboncino squash in Nancy Howell's garden plot doesn't resemble the trombone for which it's named but, rather, a french horn. “This is what happens when you stay away for one day,” she says, laughing, holding up a huge squash that's curled in on itself like a snail. Tromboncino is a highly vigorous variety -- some would say an aggressive squash -- that can take over a plot quickly. For that reason Howell, a member of the Ocean View Farms community garden in Mar Vista, plants it toward the end of summer on the heels of less-demanding summer squash.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2001 | Jessica Strand
In the right hands, the sweet, hard-skinned squashes of the season are wonderfully versatile. Water Grill: Chef Michael Cimarusti serves oxtail braised with red wine and savoy cabbage on a layer of Tahitian squash--and, as if that weren't enough, he lays rare slices of blue fin tuna on top. (Blue fin tuna with braised oxtail, $36.) Water Grill, 544 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles; (213) 891-0900.
FOOD
November 21, 1996
Wild Things Indian corn makes a much more interesting base for seasonal dried flower arrangements than plain water or even marbles. The wild tops of the corn that escape out the top of the vase give the arrangement a rustic look. It's pretty enough to keep through the end of the year. You will need: 4 ears dried Indian corn 1 tall glass vase 1 bunch dried flowers Place corn in vase, with tops protruding. Scrunch tops to mold into desired shapes, trimming where necessary.
FOOD
February 23, 2013
  Total time: About 1 hour, plus cooling time for the chiles Servings: 6 to 8 2 poblano chiles 4 tablespoons (½ stick) butter 2 tablespoons oil 2 onions, diced 5 pounds butternut squash (2 medium, or 1 large), peeled, seeded and cut into ½-inch cubes 1/3 cup dry white wine 6 cups vegetable broth 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon New Mexico chile powder 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg Freshly ground black pepper 1/4 cup maple syrup, divided 1/2 cup raisins, coarsely chopped 6 to 8 pieces stale bread, preferably dark whole-grain, coarsely chopped 1 cup heavy cream Fine sea salt Tabasco sauce, optional 1 bunch green onions, thinly sliced on the bias 1. Roast the poblano chiles over high heat on a rack over a stove-top burner.
NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Caitlin Keller
On Valentine's Day, maybe you woo your sweetie with flowers, chocolates or even diamonds. But what are you going to do about dinner? Whether you'll be curling up to a showing of “When Harry Met Sally” at the Electric Dusk Drive-In, strolling the streets at downtown L.A.'s Art Walk or checking out “Art by People in Love,” an open mic night for romantics at the Echo Park Film Center, we've got ideas for dining pre- or post-outing with your...
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Jeff Spurrier
The tromboncino squash in Nancy Howell's garden plot doesn't resemble the trombone for which it's named but, rather, a french horn. “This is what happens when you stay away for one day,” she says, laughing, holding up a huge squash that's curled in on itself like a snail. Tromboncino is a highly vigorous variety -- some would say an aggressive squash -- that can take over a plot quickly. For that reason Howell, a member of the Ocean View Farms community garden in Mar Vista, plants it toward the end of summer on the heels of less-demanding summer squash.
NEWS
November 18, 2012
This week's Culinary SOS request comes from Lynn Whitehouse in San Diego: "On our anniversary we had dinner at Flavor del Mar in San Diego County. I had an amazing butternut squash soup. I asked our waiter what the spices were. He said the chef did not give out information and recipes. I am wondering whether you can get me the recipe. I have tried various ones and cannot duplicate the flavors. My mouth waters just thinking about the soup. " A perfect fall dish, roasted butternut squash is combined with onion and garlic and finished with rich cream in this soup, a touch of fragrant nutmeg and cinnamon rounding out the flavors.  Thanks, Lynn!
FOOD
November 17, 2012 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: On our anniversary we had dinner at Flavor del Mar in San Diego County. I had an amazing butternut squash soup. I asked our waiter what the spices were. He said the chef did not give out information and recipes. I am wondering whether you can get me the recipe. I have tried various ones and cannot duplicate the flavors. My mouth waters just thinking about the soup. Lynn Whitehouse San Diego Dear Lynn: A perfect fall dish, roasted butternut squash is combined with onion and garlic and finished with rich cream in this soup, a touch of fragrant nutmeg and cinnamon rounding out the flavors.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
This soup from Times Food editor Russ Parsons tastes so complex your guests will be guessing what's in it. Really, though, it's not much more than squash itself, pureed. The final addition of vinegar is crucial, though, to keep the flavors focused. The recipe is demonstrated in the video at left by Russ Parsons. Creamy butternut squash soup is one of the favorite holiday recipes we've collected in our "Los Angeles Times Holiday Handbook. " The book shares more than 110 seasonal recipes to help you celebrate Thanksgiving, Hanukkah , Christmas and New Year's.
FOOD
March 10, 2012
Total time: 50 minutes, plus cooling time for the squash Servings: 4 to 6 1 pound section of butternut squash, unpeeled (preferably the thinner neck) Olive oil 2 1/2 teaspoons minced garlic (about 2 cloves) 1/2 teaspoon minced fresh thyme Salt 1 ounce grated Parmigiano-Reggiano (about ¼ cup loosely packed) 1 pound kale 1 teaspoon sherry vinegar 1/4 cup chopped toasted walnuts 1. Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Cut the butternut squash lengthwise into quarters, then seed and remove any of the stringy center.
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