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December 6, 2009 | By Mark Yemma
David Herron doesn't consider himself a particularly hard-nosed negotiator. After all, Herron works as a technical service specialist for the Fantasmic show at Disneyland, and that happiest-place-on-Earth attitude tends to rub off. But when Herron decided to sell his Lake Forest home last year, he was determined to find a real estate agent who was willing to cut a deal on the usual 6% commission -- the fee traditionally paid by home sellers to...
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BUSINESS
December 6, 2009 | By Mark Yemma
David Herron doesn't consider himself a particularly hard-nosed negotiator. After all, Herron works as a technical service specialist for the Fantasmic show at Disneyland, and that happiest-place-on-Earth attitude tends to rub off. But when Herron decided to sell his Lake Forest home last year, he was determined to find a real estate agent who was willing to cut a deal on the usual 6% commission -- the fee traditionally paid by home sellers to...
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REAL ESTATE
June 21, 1992
Ellen James Martin, who wrote about home buyers' agents and their duties and obligations, ("Keeping Your Cool While House Hunting," April 5), apparently is not aware that in California we have very specific guidelines and they are much more than just "being friendly." On California's "Disclosure Regarding Real Estate Agency Relationships" form, under "Buyer's Agent" it states that the selling agent may act solely for the buyer and is not the seller's agent even though the selling agent may receive compensation from the seller for services rendered.
REAL ESTATE
February 4, 1996
I've been an active Realtor in the Hollywood Hills for 23 years and after reading "All Yours" (Jan. 7), I must protest. The reader is warned about the "traditional" agent, i.e., that agent who wishes to sell his listings so that his "incentives" and commission can be collected, buyer be damned. Real estate transactions are by their very nature bilateral. Unless all parties to the transaction are treated with the utmost care, integrity and honesty, problems invariably arise. Those of us who have been in business more than 10 minutes are acutely aware of this.
REAL ESTATE
March 22, 1987
I read David Myers' article, "New Laws Affect Real Estate Deals" (Jan. 18) with interest as I was in the early process of escrow, which opened on Jan. 2, and was subject to the new disclosure rules the real estate lobby got passed in the last Legislature. My costs to sell the house for $69,000 included the following: For the loan application for the buyer, $354; title company, $513,50; first-mortgage holder fee, $100; second-mortgage holder fee, $190; repair dry rot on one board, $55; county tax collector, $75.90.
REAL ESTATE
February 4, 1996
I've been an active Realtor in the Hollywood Hills for 23 years and after reading "All Yours" (Jan. 7), I must protest. The reader is warned about the "traditional" agent, i.e., that agent who wishes to sell his listings so that his "incentives" and commission can be collected, buyer be damned. Real estate transactions are by their very nature bilateral. Unless all parties to the transaction are treated with the utmost care, integrity and honesty, problems invariably arise. Those of us who have been in business more than 10 minutes are acutely aware of this.
REAL ESTATE
December 3, 1995
I feel compelled to write in support of Robert Bruss' Oct. 8 article that Jay Belson and Valerie Fitzgerald so vehemently objected to. I base my opinions on my experience as a real estate agent. During that time, I acted exclusively as a buyer's agent, thus my company did not take listings and did not work with sellers. What Belson and Fitzgerald fail to discuss is the specific situation of dual agency (when an agent represents the buyer and seller). Can a buyer be properly represented?
REAL ESTATE
May 10, 1987
There have been several letters and articles on the problems with seller representation during the sale of a home. I would like to describe the other side of the problem. I recently completed the purchase of a home in Long Beach through a national real estate firm. During the ordeal I had to argue with my agent on the importance of a home inspection on a 60-year-old home. After 25 minutes of arguing, I finally asked her: "Why are we arguing, aren't you supposed to represent my best interest since you are my agent?"
REAL ESTATE
December 3, 1995
I feel compelled to write in support of Robert Bruss' Oct. 8 article that Jay Belson and Valerie Fitzgerald so vehemently objected to. I base my opinions on my experience as a real estate agent. During that time, I acted exclusively as a buyer's agent, thus my company did not take listings and did not work with sellers. What Belson and Fitzgerald fail to discuss is the specific situation of dual agency (when an agent represents the buyer and seller). Can a buyer be properly represented?
REAL ESTATE
June 21, 1992
Ellen James Martin, who wrote about home buyers' agents and their duties and obligations, ("Keeping Your Cool While House Hunting," April 5), apparently is not aware that in California we have very specific guidelines and they are much more than just "being friendly." On California's "Disclosure Regarding Real Estate Agency Relationships" form, under "Buyer's Agent" it states that the selling agent may act solely for the buyer and is not the seller's agent even though the selling agent may receive compensation from the seller for services rendered.
REAL ESTATE
May 10, 1987
There have been several letters and articles on the problems with seller representation during the sale of a home. I would like to describe the other side of the problem. I recently completed the purchase of a home in Long Beach through a national real estate firm. During the ordeal I had to argue with my agent on the importance of a home inspection on a 60-year-old home. After 25 minutes of arguing, I finally asked her: "Why are we arguing, aren't you supposed to represent my best interest since you are my agent?"
REAL ESTATE
March 22, 1987
I read David Myers' article, "New Laws Affect Real Estate Deals" (Jan. 18) with interest as I was in the early process of escrow, which opened on Jan. 2, and was subject to the new disclosure rules the real estate lobby got passed in the last Legislature. My costs to sell the house for $69,000 included the following: For the loan application for the buyer, $354; title company, $513,50; first-mortgage holder fee, $100; second-mortgage holder fee, $190; repair dry rot on one board, $55; county tax collector, $75.90.
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