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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams
In his slate-blue suit and Republican-red tie, John Yoo stands out as discordantly formal among the denim- and turtleneck-clad faculty at Boalt Hall School of Law. Never mind how his politics play in what he derides as "the People's Republic of Berkeley." The former Bush administration lawyer who drafted what his critics call the "torture memos" is reviled by many in this liberal East Bay academic enclave, a feeling that is mutual though not, Yoo insists, wholly unpleasant. "I think of myself as being West Berlin during the Cold War, a shining beacon of capitalism and democracy surrounded by a sea of Marxism," Yoo observes, sipping iced tea in the faculty club lounge, a wan smile registering the discomfort of colleagues walking by en route to the bar. He sees his neighbors as the human figures of "a natural history museum of the 1960s," the Telegraph Avenue tableau of a graying, long-haired, pot-smoking counterculture stuck in the ideology's half-century-old heyday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Write
U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Jay S. Bybee accepted more than $3.2 million in free legal services from a Los Angeles-based firm to fight allegations of ethics violations for providing the Bush administration legal justification to use harsh interrogation tactics that critics called torture, his financial disclosure reports reveal. In his latest report to the Administrative Office of the U.S.
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NATIONAL
February 20, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano
An internal Justice Department report released Friday has concluded that although two former Bush administration lawyers used "poor judgment" in issuing legal memos authorizing waterboarding and other harsh interrogation tactics on terrorism suspects, they did not commit any professional misconduct. The report by the department's Office of Professional Responsibility noted that the lawyers did not purposely give bad legal advice to CIA interrogators and others dealing with suspects captured after the Sept.
OPINION
July 21, 2010
One of the most shameful chapters in the war against terrorism was the complicity of George W. Bush's Justice Department in the CIA's use of "enhanced interrogation techniques" — in plain language, torture — to extract information from suspected terrorists. Now the coauthor of two notorious 2002 memorandums issued by the department's Office of Legal Counsel has confirmed that interrogators transgressed even the minimal restrictions imposed by the memos. In an interview conducted by the House Judiciary Committee in May but released only last week, former Assistant Atty.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2009 | Carol J. Williams
A federal judge who provided the Bush administration with legal advice on what constitutes torture declined to respond Thursday to a letter from the Senate Judiciary Committee chairman calling on him to explain his actions to the American public. Judge Jay S. Bybee, of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, was head of the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel when he described the intensity of pain that could legally be inflicted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1996 | DEBRA CANO and MIMI KO CRUZ
Officer Fred Bybee, 49, has been chosen Officer of the Year by his peers in the Fullerton Police Department. Bybee was hired as a city jailer in 1974 and joined the police force in 1978. He has worked many beats, including homicide and robbery investigation, vice, training, community service and burglary investigation and patrol. "Becoming a police officer was the best thing I ever did," Bybee said. "I enjoy coming to work now as much as I did when I first started."
OPINION
February 23, 2010
Arespected career Justice Department official has concluded that two George W. Bush administration lawyers who wrote memos authorizing the physical and psychological abuse of suspected terrorists didn't commit misconduct that would justify disbarring or disciplining them. But Associate Deputy Atty. Gen. David Margolis' report is far from a vindication for John C. Yoo and Jay S. Bybee's shamefully narrow interpretations of laws against torture and extravagant views about presidential power.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
The former Justice Department official who co-wrote the so-called torture memos testified that the department did not sanction some of the harsh methods the CIA used against detainees during the George W. Bush administration, including the repeated waterboarding of two suspected terrorists. Jay S. Bybee, former head of the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel, said in testimony released Thursday by the House Judiciary Committee that the CIA went further in its tough tactics than he had outlined as permissible in a widely criticized legal memoranda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2002 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Wednesday nominated Jay S. Bybee, a ranking Justice Department official and a conservative constitutional scholar, for a judgeship on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, which reviews cases from California and eight other Western states. Bybee, 48, has been serving in recent months as head of the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel, which advises the president and Atty. Gen.
OPINION
July 21, 2010
One of the most shameful chapters in the war against terrorism was the complicity of George W. Bush's Justice Department in the CIA's use of "enhanced interrogation techniques" — in plain language, torture — to extract information from suspected terrorists. Now the coauthor of two notorious 2002 memorandums issued by the department's Office of Legal Counsel has confirmed that interrogators transgressed even the minimal restrictions imposed by the memos. In an interview conducted by the House Judiciary Committee in May but released only last week, former Assistant Atty.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
The former Justice Department official who co-wrote the so-called torture memos testified that the department did not sanction some of the harsh methods the CIA used against detainees during the George W. Bush administration, including the repeated waterboarding of two suspected terrorists. Jay S. Bybee, former head of the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel, said in testimony released Thursday by the House Judiciary Committee that the CIA went further in its tough tactics than he had outlined as permissible in a widely criticized legal memoranda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams
In his slate-blue suit and Republican-red tie, John Yoo stands out as discordantly formal among the denim- and turtleneck-clad faculty at Boalt Hall School of Law. Never mind how his politics play in what he derides as "the People's Republic of Berkeley." The former Bush administration lawyer who drafted what his critics call the "torture memos" is reviled by many in this liberal East Bay academic enclave, a feeling that is mutual though not, Yoo insists, wholly unpleasant. "I think of myself as being West Berlin during the Cold War, a shining beacon of capitalism and democracy surrounded by a sea of Marxism," Yoo observes, sipping iced tea in the faculty club lounge, a wan smile registering the discomfort of colleagues walking by en route to the bar. He sees his neighbors as the human figures of "a natural history museum of the 1960s," the Telegraph Avenue tableau of a graying, long-haired, pot-smoking counterculture stuck in the ideology's half-century-old heyday.
OPINION
February 23, 2010
Arespected career Justice Department official has concluded that two George W. Bush administration lawyers who wrote memos authorizing the physical and psychological abuse of suspected terrorists didn't commit misconduct that would justify disbarring or disciplining them. But Associate Deputy Atty. Gen. David Margolis' report is far from a vindication for John C. Yoo and Jay S. Bybee's shamefully narrow interpretations of laws against torture and extravagant views about presidential power.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano
An internal Justice Department report released Friday has concluded that although two former Bush administration lawyers used "poor judgment" in issuing legal memos authorizing waterboarding and other harsh interrogation tactics on terrorism suspects, they did not commit any professional misconduct. The report by the department's Office of Professional Responsibility noted that the lawyers did not purposely give bad legal advice to CIA interrogators and others dealing with suspects captured after the Sept.
NATIONAL
May 6, 2009 | Josh Meyer and Julian E. Barnes
Justice Department investigators have concluded that three Bush administration lawyers who wrote controversial interrogation memos should not face criminal charges, but that conduct by two of them was problematic enough to merit possible state disbarment or other disciplinary action, according to two sources familiar with a draft report.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2009 | Carol J. Williams
A federal judge who provided the Bush administration with legal advice on what constitutes torture declined to respond Thursday to a letter from the Senate Judiciary Committee chairman calling on him to explain his actions to the American public. Judge Jay S. Bybee, of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, was head of the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel when he described the intensity of pain that could legally be inflicted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Write
U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Jay S. Bybee accepted more than $3.2 million in free legal services from a Los Angeles-based firm to fight allegations of ethics violations for providing the Bush administration legal justification to use harsh interrogation tactics that critics called torture, his financial disclosure reports reveal. In his latest report to the Administrative Office of the U.S.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2009 | Washington Post
On a Saturday night in May last year, Jay S. Bybee hosted dinner for 35 at a Las Vegas restaurant. The young people seated around him had all served as his law clerks in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, the post Bybee assumed after two turbulent years at the Justice Department, where as head of the Office of Legal Counsel he signed the legal justifications that have become known as the "torture memos."
NATIONAL
April 25, 2009 | Washington Post
On a Saturday night in May last year, Jay S. Bybee hosted dinner for 35 at a Las Vegas restaurant. The young people seated around him had all served as his law clerks in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, the post Bybee assumed after two turbulent years at the Justice Department, where as head of the Office of Legal Counsel he signed the legal justifications that have become known as the "torture memos."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2002 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Wednesday nominated Jay S. Bybee, a ranking Justice Department official and a conservative constitutional scholar, for a judgeship on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, which reviews cases from California and eight other Western states. Bybee, 48, has been serving in recent months as head of the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel, which advises the president and Atty. Gen.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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