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Byron De La Beckwith

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2001 | From Associated Press
Byron De La Beckwith, the white supremacist convicted after three decades and three trials of assassinating civil rights leader Medgar Evers, has died while serving life in prison. Beckwith, 80, died Sunday night at University Medical Center, where he had been taken from his prison cell. Evers, a 37-year-old NAACP field secretary who pushed for an end to segregation, was shot in the back on June 12, 1963, after stepping out of his car to walk to his house.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2001 | From Associated Press
Byron De La Beckwith, the white supremacist convicted after three decades and three trials of assassinating civil rights leader Medgar Evers, has died while serving life in prison. Beckwith, 80, died Sunday night at University Medical Center, where he had been taken from his prison cell. Evers, a 37-year-old NAACP field secretary who pushed for an end to segregation, was shot in the back on June 12, 1963, after stepping out of his car to walk to his house.
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NEWS
January 22, 2001 | Associated Press
Byron De La Beckwith, convicted assassin of civil rights leader Medgar Evers in 1963, died Sunday night at University Medical Center. Barbara Austin, a hospital spokeswoman, said Beckwith entered the hospital at 12:07 p.m. PST. She could not elaborate on his ailment or the cause of death. "It's a matter for the coroner's office to determine," she said. Evers, 37, who as a field secretary for the National Assn.
NEWS
January 22, 2001 | Associated Press
Byron De La Beckwith, convicted assassin of civil rights leader Medgar Evers in 1963, died Sunday night at University Medical Center. Barbara Austin, a hospital spokeswoman, said Beckwith entered the hospital at 12:07 p.m. PST. She could not elaborate on his ailment or the cause of death. "It's a matter for the coroner's office to determine," she said. Evers, 37, who as a field secretary for the National Assn.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A key witness against a white supremacist re-arrested in the 1963 slaying of NAACP leader Medgar Evers said he is scared and does not want to testify. Delar Dennis, an FBI informant while in the Ku Klux Klan from 1964 to 1967, notified Hinds County, Miss., prosecutors that he feared for himself and his family if he testified against Byron De La Beckwith. Beckwith, 70, of Signal Mountain, Tenn., is jailed in Chattanooga, Tenn.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | Associated Press
A man who faces his third trial in the 1963 slaying of civil rights leader Medgar Evers was freed Wednesday on bail. Byron De La Beckwith was released hours after Judge L. Breland Hilburn Jr. of Hinds County Circuit Court set $100,000 bail and ordered the Tennessee man to stay in Mississippi until his trial. A benefactor who did not want to be identified provided the cash needed for Beckwith to be freed, his attorney said.
NEWS
February 3, 1991
I want to thank you for Garry Abrams' excellent article "Mississippi Turning" (Jan. 16). In addition to portraying the personal tragedy of Myrlie Evers, the article gave long-overdue acknowledgment to (former Klansman/FBI informant) Delmar Dennis and William H. McIlhany, author of "Klandestine," for making possible the current prosecution of Byron De La Beckwith (for the slaying of Medgar Evers in 1963). The book also is proof that the John Birch Society is opposed to racism and anti-Semitism, contrary to false impressions created by leftists in the news media.
NEWS
June 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Byron De La Beckwith, who has been tried twice for the 1963 slaying of civil rights leader Medgar Evers, must be returned to Mississippi to stand trial a third time, the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals ruled. Beckwith, 70, was first arrested Dec. 17. Freed on $15,000 bond, he was arrested again Dec. 30 on a warrant signed by Gov. Ned McWherter. Both of Beckwith's earlier trials ended in hung juries.
NEWS
February 2, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The prosecution rested in the Jackson, Miss., murder trial of Byron De La Beckwith after producing a surprise witness who said he heard the white supremacist claim responsibility for killing civil rights leader Medgar Evers in 1963.
NEWS
January 22, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
A state appeals court today blocked the extradition of white supremacist Byron De La Beckwith to Mississippi for a third trial for the 1963 slaying of civil rights leader Medgar Evers. The Tennessee Criminal Court of Appeals said Beckwith could remain in Tennessee while he fights extradition to face a first-degree murder charge. But the court denied bail for the 70-year-old Signal Mountain man, who has been jailed in Chattanooga since his arrest Dec. 31 on a governor's warrant.
NEWS
December 23, 1997 | From Associated Press
Mississippi's Supreme Court upheld the conviction of white supremacist Byron De La Beckwith on Monday in the 1963 assassination of civil rights leader Medgar Evers, saying he got a fair trial despite the 31 years that elapsed between the crime and the verdict. "Miscreants brought before the bar of justice in this state must, sooner or later, face the cold realization that justice, slow and plodding though she may be, is certain in the state of Mississippi," Justice Mike Mills wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1996 | Sean Mitchell, Sean Mitchell is an occasional contributor to Calendar
Assassinated in June 1963, five months before John F. Kennedy and five years before Martin Luther King, Medgar Evers was the first of the series of national liberal political figures gunned down in America in that fateful, uneasy decade. Bob Dylan wrote a song about him ("A Pawn in Their Game") and he was given a martyr's burial in Arlington National Cemetery, yet Evers remains possibly an obscure figure to today's film-going audience.
NEWS
February 6, 1994 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-one years after the assassination of civil rights leader Medgar Evers, Byron De La Beckwith, the man arrested within two weeks of the murder, was found guilty Saturday and sentenced to life in prison for the crime. A cheer went up from spectators in the courtroom gallery as the verdict was read. Beckwith's wife, Thelma, broke into sobs. But the 73-year-old avowed white supremacist showed no emotion as Hinds County Circuit Judge L. Breland Hilburn handed down the mandatory sentence.
NEWS
February 5, 1994 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fate of 73-year-old Byron De La Beckwith was handed over Friday to a jury of eight blacks and four whites to decide whether the avowed racist is guilty of the 1963 murder of civil rights leader Medgar Evers. The jury deliberated for almost five hours before Circuit Court Judge L. Breland Hilburn called a recess. Deliberations will resume at 9 a.m. today. "All we ask you for is to give the Evers family and the state of Mississippi some justice," said Dist. Atty.
NEWS
February 3, 1994 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unwavering and sometimes combative, a retired police officer Wednesday repeated the testimony he gave 30 years ago in the Medgar Evers murder trial: that he had seen accused assassin Byron De La Beckwith 90 miles away from Jackson less than an hour after Evers was killed. Under cross-examination, James Holley also said he was a longtime friend of Beckwith, whom he referred to by his nickname, Delay. Holley, 65, who is white, also said that in 1963 he was a strong believer in segregation.
NEWS
February 2, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The prosecution rested in the Jackson, Miss., murder trial of Byron De La Beckwith after producing a surprise witness who said he heard the white supremacist claim responsibility for killing civil rights leader Medgar Evers in 1963.
NEWS
January 23, 1991 | From Associated Press
A state appeals court on Tuesday blocked the extradition of white supremacist Byron De La Beckwith to Mississippi for a third trial for the 1963 slaying of civil rights leader Medgar Evers. The Tennessee Criminal Court of Appeals said Beckwith could remain in Tennessee while he fights extradition to face a first-degree murder charge. But the court denied bail for the 70-year-old Signal Mountain man.
NEWS
February 1, 1994 | WILLIAM BOOTH, THE WASHINGTON POST
Mary Ann Adams told jurors Monday how Byron De La Beckwith was introduced to her as "the man who killed Medgar Evers," the civil rights leader shot to death three decades ago. After the bookkeeper refused to shake his hand, Beckwith told her "he had not killed a man," Adams testified Monday, "but a damn chicken-stealing dog--and you know what you have to do when a dog has tasted blood."
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | Associated Press
A man who faces his third trial in the 1963 slaying of civil rights leader Medgar Evers was freed Wednesday on bail. Byron De La Beckwith was released hours after Judge L. Breland Hilburn Jr. of Hinds County Circuit Court set $100,000 bail and ordered the Tennessee man to stay in Mississippi until his trial. A benefactor who did not want to be identified provided the cash needed for Beckwith to be freed, his attorney said.
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