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NEWS
December 8, 1994 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Acting on the recommendation of University of California President Jack W. Peltason, the UC Board of Regents on Wednesday appointed a new director of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, one of the government's premier nuclear weapons research centers. C. Bruce Tarter, 54, an astrophysicist who has served as the lab's acting director since April, was named to the $186,600-a-year post effective immediately. He replaces John H.
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NEWS
December 8, 1994 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Acting on the recommendation of University of California President Jack W. Peltason, the UC Board of Regents on Wednesday appointed a new director of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, one of the government's premier nuclear weapons research centers. C. Bruce Tarter, 54, an astrophysicist who has served as the lab's acting director since April, was named to the $186,600-a-year post effective immediately. He replaces John H.
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NATIONAL
April 25, 2007 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
The United States lacks a clear policy on the future of its nuclear weapons forces, complicating an effort to develop a new generation of bombs, a group of highly influential scientists said Tuesday. At the same time, they said, bottlenecks have developed in the weapons production system, particularly at a Texas assembly plant, that could undermine efforts to produce large numbers of new bombs or even maintain the existing stockpile.
NEWS
June 12, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Energy Secretary Bill Richardson stood in a packed auditorium at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory here Friday and pleaded with the 400 or so Asian American and other employees to share their concerns and fears. A Chinese American engineer and computer analyst jumped to her feet as soon as he stopped speaking. "As someone who works with the weapons program, I feel like I'm a suspect at the lab until proven guilty," she complained.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1994
When a visitor enters the forbidden offices and laboratories of the scientists who design nuclear weapons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the secretaries go through a time-honored secrecy ritual. They trot out knee-high sandwich boards and place them like wet-floor signs, warning denizens not to discuss classified information while the outsider is there. But there is much less to keep secret these days at Livermore and other national laboratories.
NEWS
July 30, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's premier nuclear weapon laboratories are losing highly trained staff, failing to attract new scientists and suffering from plummeting productivity and morale in the wake of embarrassing security scandals and intense scrutiny from Washington.
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