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C Delores Tucker

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March 20, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
C. DeLores Tucker captured the outrage of many parents three years ago when she declared war on gangsta rap music. Prominent politicians leaped to her side. She became a celebrity by denouncing companies that "pimped porno rap" to children. The 67-year-old African American feminist never stopped the distribution of any music. But now she is embroiled in an increasingly bitter and personal dispute with Death Row Records, home to such rap stars as Dr. Dre, Tupac Shakur and Snoop Doggy Dogg.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2005 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
C. DeLores Tucker, a longtime civil rights activist best known as a fiery antagonist of profanity-laced rap music lyrics that denigrate blacks and women, died Wednesday at a Philadelphia rehabilitation hospital. She was 78. The cause was heart failure, according to a spokesman for the National Congress of Black Women, based in Silver Spring, Md., which Tucker founded in 1984.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2005 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
C. DeLores Tucker, a longtime civil rights activist best known as a fiery antagonist of profanity-laced rap music lyrics that denigrate blacks and women, died Wednesday at a Philadelphia rehabilitation hospital. She was 78. The cause was heart failure, according to a spokesman for the National Congress of Black Women, based in Silver Spring, Md., which Tucker founded in 1984.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2002 | From Associated Press
A federal judge threw out a $70-million lawsuit filed by a crusader against gangsta rap who claimed that lawyers for two record labels tried to drive her to emotional and financial ruin. C. DeLores Tucker and her husband sued in 1999, claiming that she was the victim of malicious prosecution because of her campaign against gangsta rap. A Tucker lawyer said the ruling by U.S. District Judge Robert Takasugi dismissing her lawsuit would be appealed. A Death Row Records lawyer declined to comment.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2002 | From Associated Press
A federal judge threw out a $70-million lawsuit filed by a crusader against gangsta rap who claimed that lawyers for two record labels tried to drive her to emotional and financial ruin. C. DeLores Tucker and her husband sued in 1999, claiming that she was the victim of malicious prosecution because of her campaign against gangsta rap. A Tucker lawyer said the ruling by U.S. District Judge Robert Takasugi dismissing her lawsuit would be appealed. A Death Row Records lawyer declined to comment.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
EMI Urged to Stop 'Gangsta' Rap Distribution: C. DeLores Tucker, chairwoman of the National Political Congress of Black Women, has written a letter to Thorn-EMI Chairman Colin Southgate asking him to stop the music division of his British conglomerate from distributing "gangsta" rap music that she says "glorifies drugs, gang rape, gun-toting and violence." Tucker helped orchestrate the anti-rap campaign that pressured Time Warner Inc.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1999 | From Associated Press
A judge dismissed a defamation lawsuit filed by a gangsta rap critic against two newsmagazines for their reports on her earlier lawsuit against the estate of slain rapper Tupac Shakur. U.S. District Judge Ronald L. Buckwalter threw out C. DeLores Tucker's lawsuit against Time, Newsweek, writers for those two publications, and Shakur estate lawyer Richard Fischbein. Buckwalter ruled that Tucker, a former Pennsylvania secretary of state, was a public figure in the eyes of the law.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rap music critic C. DeLores Tucker has asked the federal government to investigate whether record retailers are breaking the law by selling what she calls "obscene" rap lyrics to minors. Tucker, chairwoman of the National Political Congress of Black Women, wrote the Justice Department a letter in December complaining about the negative impact of gangsta rap music on children. The Justice Department asked her to direct her complaints to the FBI.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1997 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Gangsta rap critic C. DeLores Tucker filed a $5-million defamation lawsuit Wednesday against Time and Newsweek, saying the magazines published malicious articles about her sex life. The suit, filed in Philadelphia federal court, says Time and Newsweek purposely mischaracterized a "loss of consortium" claim listed in a separate $10-million defamation suit lodged by Tucker in July against the estate of rapper Tupac Shakur.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1997 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
C. DeLores Tucker, who built a national reputation criticizing the violent and lewd lyrics of gangsta rap, has found a new and personal objection to rap lyrics. Tucker, in a lawsuit filed this week in Philadelphia federal court, contends that Tupac Shakur's estate should pay her $10 million because lyrics on a 1996 album made derogatory references to her. Among other things, the lawsuit says, the anguish caused by those lyrics cut down on her sex life with her husband.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1999 | From Associated Press
A judge dismissed a defamation lawsuit filed by a gangsta rap critic against two newsmagazines for their reports on her earlier lawsuit against the estate of slain rapper Tupac Shakur. U.S. District Judge Ronald L. Buckwalter threw out C. DeLores Tucker's lawsuit against Time, Newsweek, writers for those two publications, and Shakur estate lawyer Richard Fischbein. Buckwalter ruled that Tucker, a former Pennsylvania secretary of state, was a public figure in the eyes of the law.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1997 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Gangsta rap critic C. DeLores Tucker filed a $5-million defamation lawsuit Wednesday against Time and Newsweek, saying the magazines published malicious articles about her sex life. The suit, filed in Philadelphia federal court, says Time and Newsweek purposely mischaracterized a "loss of consortium" claim listed in a separate $10-million defamation suit lodged by Tucker in July against the estate of rapper Tupac Shakur.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1997 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
C. DeLores Tucker, who built a national reputation criticizing the violent and lewd lyrics of gangsta rap, has found a new and personal objection to rap lyrics. Tucker, in a lawsuit filed this week in Philadelphia federal court, contends that Tupac Shakur's estate should pay her $10 million because lyrics on a 1996 album made derogatory references to her. Among other things, the lawsuit says, the anguish caused by those lyrics cut down on her sex life with her husband.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1996 | D.J. SALEM-FITZGERALD and CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Escalating their attack on "gangsta music," anti-rap crusaders C. DeLores Tucker and William Bennett called on major record labels Thursday to sever their relationship with artists whose songs contain explicit sexual and violent lyrics. "Music conglomerates [are] putting money before the overall welfare of our children and the community," said Tucker, chairwoman of the National Political Congress of Black Women. "These companies have the blood of our children on their hands."
NEWS
March 20, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
C. DeLores Tucker captured the outrage of many parents three years ago when she declared war on gangsta rap music. Prominent politicians leaped to her side. She became a celebrity by denouncing companies that "pimped porno rap" to children. The 67-year-old African American feminist never stopped the distribution of any music. But now she is embroiled in an increasingly bitter and personal dispute with Death Row Records, home to such rap stars as Dr. Dre, Tupac Shakur and Snoop Doggy Dogg.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rap music critic C. DeLores Tucker has asked the federal government to investigate whether record retailers are breaking the law by selling what she calls "obscene" rap lyrics to minors. Tucker, chairwoman of the National Political Congress of Black Women, wrote the Justice Department a letter in December complaining about the negative impact of gangsta rap music on children. The Justice Department asked her to direct her complaints to the FBI.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first public breach between Time Warner Inc. and Interscope Records, the controversial Westwood-based company filed a lawsuit Tuesday against rap critic C. DeLores Tucker, accusing her of scheming with Time Warner to take the sting out of Interscope's rap music. Interscope distributes music by Death Row Records, home to Dr. Dre and Snoop Doggy Dogg, and has repeatedly come under fire in recent months by Tucker and others who have called on Time Warner to sever ties with the label.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1996 | D.J. SALEM-FITZGERALD and CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Escalating their attack on "gangsta music," anti-rap crusaders C. DeLores Tucker and William Bennett called on major record labels Thursday to sever their relationship with artists whose songs contain explicit sexual and violent lyrics. "Music conglomerates [are] putting money before the overall welfare of our children and the community," said Tucker, chairwoman of the National Political Congress of Black Women. "These companies have the blood of our children on their hands."
BUSINESS
December 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
EMI Urged to Stop 'Gangsta' Rap Distribution: C. DeLores Tucker, chairwoman of the National Political Congress of Black Women, has written a letter to Thorn-EMI Chairman Colin Southgate asking him to stop the music division of his British conglomerate from distributing "gangsta" rap music that she says "glorifies drugs, gang rape, gun-toting and violence." Tucker helped orchestrate the anti-rap campaign that pressured Time Warner Inc.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first public breach between Time Warner Inc. and Interscope Records, the controversial Westwood-based company filed a lawsuit Tuesday against rap critic C. DeLores Tucker, accusing her of scheming with Time Warner to take the sting out of Interscope's rap music. Interscope distributes music by Death Row Records, home to Dr. Dre and Snoop Doggy Dogg, and has repeatedly come under fire in recent months by Tucker and others who have called on Time Warner to sever ties with the label.
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