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C Dolores Tucker

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NEWS
July 5, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When C. Delores Tucker gets up to speak, she represents a lifetime of left-wing social action and dozens of black, feminist, liberal organizations that stand behind her. "When I get up to speak," says William J. Bennett, adviser to Republican presidents, "I don't represent any of those groups." Yet these two very disparate people have formed an unlikely alliance based on a strong underpinning of shared concerns.
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NEWS
July 5, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When C. Delores Tucker gets up to speak, she represents a lifetime of left-wing social action and dozens of black, feminist, liberal organizations that stand behind her. "When I get up to speak," says William J. Bennett, adviser to Republican presidents, "I don't represent any of those groups." Yet these two very disparate people have formed an unlikely alliance based on a strong underpinning of shared concerns.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1997 | CHEO HODARI COKER
The late Tupac Shakur was probably the most mercurial rap artist who ever lived. One minute he was rapping about the good life, the next about altercation; only occasionally would the true warrior poet in Shakur emerge, the street philosopher who explored his links to traditions raging from jazz scatting to the wandering ballad of the blues traveler.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The American Family Assn., an influential Christian lobbying group, has urged a boycott of products made by Unilever, a leading sponsor of "NYPD Blue" and other TV shows that the group considers excessively violent, profane or sexual. The group announced the boycott in a full-page ad in Sunday's New York Times after its attempts to meet with Unilever executives failed.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1995 | Steve Hochman
Who won the rap wars of '95? It depends on who's keeping score. Gangsta-rap opponents like National Political Congress of Black Women chair C. Dolores Tucker, Sen. Bob Dole and ex-cabinet official William Bennett are credited for Time Warner's jettisoning of Interscope Records (and its $100 million in revenues) and forcing out executives Doug Morris and Danny Goldberg.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1996 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood took it on the chin Friday. So, too, did television news and rap music. State attorneys general from across the nation came to the heart of the entertainment industry this week for a two-day summit on the culture of violence in the United States. And their focus was on how they believe Hollywood, television news programming and rap music contribute to it. Hollywood had no defenders, invited or otherwise. Ditto for rap.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1996 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood took it on the chin Friday. So, too, did television news and rap music. State attorneys general from around the nation came to the heart of the entertainment industry this week for a two-day summit on the culture of violence in the United States. And their focus was on how they believe Hollywood, television news programming and rap music contribute to it. Hollywood had no defenders, invited or otherwise. Ditto for rap.
SPORTS
April 11, 2003 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
Though barred from the front gates of Augusta National Golf Club, Martha Burk will still protest. "In the pits," she said. And no more debating Chairman Hootie Johnson over the issue of admitting women as members to the club that holds the Masters. It's all about the corporations now, Burk said Thursday at the Martin Luther King Center. It's all about pressure now. It's about holding accountable the chief executives of Fortune 500 companies who belong to the male-only Augusta National.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1996 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Arrested Development's 1992 debut album, "Three Years, Five Months and Two Days in the Life of . . . ," opened a new dimension in rap, introducing a down-home strain to the music and a spiritual element to the lyrics. Sparked by the evocative hit "Tennessee," the album sold 3.6 million copies and earned the Atlanta-based group two Grammys, including one for best new artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1997 | STEVE HOCHMAN and CHEO HODARI COKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES: Steve Hochman is a regular contributor to Calendar; Cheo Hodari Coker is a Times staff writer
A year after launching a controversial campaign to combat a "drug epidemic" in the music business, the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences on Monday will call for a summit to address another troubled area in the industry: the violent world of gangsta rap.
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