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C Everett Koop

BUSINESS
October 26, 1998 | CHARLES PILLER
Andy Grove, chairman of microprocessor behemoth Intel Corp., and C. Everett Koop, former U.S. surgeon general, may seem unlikely collaborators, but Tuesday they will share the podium in San Francisco to launch Intel's Internet Health Initiative. "It's one area that touches the lives of virtually everyone, and at the same time it's underrepresented on the Net," said Steven McGeady, vice president and director of the initiative.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1997 | STEPHEN BYRD
Dr. C. Everett Koop, U.S. surgeon general during the Reagan and Bush administrations, will visit Cal State Northridge Friday, joining former professor Robert C. Horn in a noon book signing. Horn's book, "How Will They Know if I'm Dead?" is an account of his and his family's struggle with Lou Gehrig's disease. Koop wrote the preface to the book. The disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, was named after the New York Yankees baseball great who was its most famous victim.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1987 | Associated Press
Surgeon General C. Everett Koop says he has been barraged with hate mail from fundamentalist Christians over his report calling for sex education to curb the spread of AIDS. "No conservative Christian leader, no conservative Christian publication, to my knowlege, has been critical of the surgeon general's report or of me, but many constituents of those denominations and movements have been," Koop said this week after appearing on "The 700 Club" on the Christian Broadcasting Network.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1991 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For eight years as U.S surgeon general, C. Everett Koop was alternately criticized and hailed for speaking his mind--launching an aggressive anti-smoking campaign, opposing abortion, promoting the use of condoms to prevent the spread of AIDS.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop said he opposes any tobacco legislation that grants cigarette makers special legal protections, a position that may pose new obstacles to efforts to enact tobacco legislation based on the $368.5-billion national tobacco settlement. Koop made it clear he is still willing to negotiate, saying he might consider legal protections "if everything we want on public health" is in a final settlement.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1989 | MARTIN ZIMMERMAN
If anything, the title of "Nova's" second show of the season, "The Controversial Dr. Koop," is an understatement. For C. Everett Koop, during his eight-year tenure as U.S. surgeon general, managed to put himself at the center of some of this century's most critical public health issues, creating a firestorm of controversy while angering people across the political spectrum. Not the least of those he angered was his sponsor and ultimate boss--President Ronald Reagan. As "Dr.
NEWS
March 17, 1989 | MICHAEL D. SHEAR, Times Staff Writer
A long-awaited report released Thursday by Surgeon General C. Everett Koop reiterated his stand that current research on the psychological impact of abortion on women is inadequate and that no conclusions on the effects can be drawn. Testifying before a House subcommittee, Koop said that more research is needed to "increase the level and quality of information about the reproductive health of women."
NEWS
January 4, 1989 | Associated Press
The leading association of physicians who treat women opened a campaign Tuesday to help battered women, and Surgeon General C. Everett Koop said domestic violence has become an overwhelming public health burden. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists said it will try to raise the awareness of its 28,000 members to the problem and will give them information on how a doctor might help an abused woman.
NEWS
January 10, 1989 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, responding to a 1987 request by President Reagan to study the health effects of abortion on women, reported Monday that--with the data now available--it is impossible to reach clear conclusions about either the physical or the psychological consequences of the procedure.
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