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C Everett Koop

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1997 | STEPHEN BYRD
Dr. C. Everett Koop, U.S. surgeon general during the Reagan and Bush administrations, will visit Cal State Northridge Friday, joining former professor Robert C. Horn in a noon book signing. Horn's book, "How Will They Know if I'm Dead?" is an account of his and his family's struggle with Lou Gehrig's disease. Koop wrote the preface to the book. The disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, was named after the New York Yankees baseball great who was its most famous victim.
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BUSINESS
January 23, 1997 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As entertainment companies increasingly focus on branding their products to stand out in a crowded and competitive marketplace, Time Warner's venerable Time Life division may have just received a lesson in the dangers of letting a brand name out of its control. For the first--and possibly last--time, the media giant sold the right to use the Time Life imprint to an outside company, for a high-visibility video project. Now, that company--Patient Education Media Inc.
NEWS
June 2, 1996 | IRA DREYFUSS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When C. Everett Koop was a mere 75, he played touch football when his extended family got together. He was the center for both teams. The former U.S. surgeon general is now 79, and his football career is probably over--for lack of enough players, because the family is too scattered, he said. But Koop still thinks it's good for personal fitness and for family values when families try to be physically active. "I don't know why they don't," he said. "It gives a darned good feeling."
NEWS
April 9, 1995 | IRA DREYFUSS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Many people who want more exercise might have purchased a stair-climbing machine. Not C. Everett Koop. He and his wife bought a three-story house "primarily for our hearts," Koop said. He figures that, just by moving around his house, he gets 10 flights of exercise a day. And Koop, who is 78, wants the rest of America to do something similar. The former surgeon general is leading a crusade to get the nation's weight down and physical activity up. Shape Up America!, an arm of his C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1995 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop calls it his last crusade, a national consciousness-raising campaign to warn of an obesity epidemic that he said affects one of every three Americans. The 78-year-old, 6-foot 1-inch scourge of the tobacco industry, who weighs 194 pounds, speaks from personal experience about the tribulations of dieting. "After I got in government, with the rubber-chicken circuit and the pressure, I got up so I was around 220 pounds," Koop said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1994 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND
Managed competition. Fee for service. Single-payer. The mind-boggling jargon being bandied about in the national health care debate is pretty much Greek to 75-year-old Evelyn Navelski. Hoping to get a better understanding of the issues, Navelski and 6,000 other, mostly older people turned out for a speech by former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop at the American Assn. of Retired Persons convention Wednesday.
NEWS
September 20, 1993 | Reuters
President Clinton has won over former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop to his health care package, Newsweek magazine reported. When the President unveils his health proposal Wednesday, Koop will be seated next to Hillary Rodham Clinton, and White House officials hope the presence of the former Ronald Reagan appointee will lend credibility to Clinton's health care reform bill, the magazine said.
SPORTS
December 6, 1991 | Associated Press
Magic Johnson, who retired from the Lakers last month after disclosing that he was infected with HIV, has signed a contract with Random House to write three books, including his autobiography and a guide to responsible sexual behavior, the publishing firm said Thursday. Retired U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop would collaborate with Johnson on the sexual guide, with proceeds to go to the new Magic Johnson Foundation to support education, care and research in AIDS and related subjects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1991 | POLLY BEE
Dr. C. Everett Koop this week predicted bankruptcy for the American health-care system unless reforms are made by a coalition of patients, providers, lawyers and insurance companies. In a speech at Los Robles Regional Medical Center in Thousand Oaks, the former U.S. surgeon general called health-care delivery and costs a shell game and a national disgrace that will change only when the American middle-class's wallet is sufficiently pinched.
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