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C Everett Koop

ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1991 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For eight years as U.S surgeon general, C. Everett Koop was alternately criticized and hailed for speaking his mind--launching an aggressive anti-smoking campaign, opposing abortion, promoting the use of condoms to prevent the spread of AIDS.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1990 | From Religious News Service
Former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop says faith healing is bunk. But the pediatric surgeon bases his diagnosis on his theological, not his medical, credentials. Dr. Koop's denunciation of faith healing is contained in his contribution to a new book, "The Agony of Deceit: What Some TV Preachers Are Really Teaching" (Moody Press).
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop ignored overwhelming medical evidence that abortion is safer than pregnancy and childbirth when he declined last January to write a report on the health effects of the procedure, a House subcommittee charged Sunday. "I recognize the diversity of opinions regarding the morality of abortion under different circumstances, but those opinions must not be allowed to interfere with scientific research or with making information available to the public," said Rep.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In uniform, in federal service, C. Everett Koop was a bearded bear in shoulder boards and braid. In retirement, Koop wears two-piece suits and oversized bow ties and lapel pins, and they make the man appear smaller, less forbidding. In his transition from title to person, home is no longer red-brick government quarters. Koop, like ordinary folk, has a new, huge mortgage on a small house in Maryland. The beard stays.
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush today announced his selection of Dr. Antonia Novello, an abortion opponent who is deputy director of the government's National Institute of Child Health, to be surgeon general. She would be the first woman to hold the post. If confirmed by the Senate, she would succeed C. Everett Koop, the outspoken pediatric surgeon who became perhaps the best known figure in American medicine for his outspoken opposition to smoking and his support for using condoms to prevent the spread of AIDS.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1989 | MARTIN ZIMMERMAN
If anything, the title of "Nova's" second show of the season, "The Controversial Dr. Koop," is an understatement. For C. Everett Koop, during his eight-year tenure as U.S. surgeon general, managed to put himself at the center of some of this century's most critical public health issues, creating a firestorm of controversy while angering people across the political spectrum. Not the least of those he angered was his sponsor and ultimate boss--President Ronald Reagan. As "Dr.
NEWS
March 17, 1989 | MICHAEL D. SHEAR, Times Staff Writer
A long-awaited report released Thursday by Surgeon General C. Everett Koop reiterated his stand that current research on the psychological impact of abortion on women is inadequate and that no conclusions on the effects can be drawn. Testifying before a House subcommittee, Koop said that more research is needed to "increase the level and quality of information about the reproductive health of women."
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