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C J Walker

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BUSINESS
March 18, 2004 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
Farmers & Merchants Bank of Long Beach is a community bank founded nearly a century ago by C.J. Walker that is still "in the hands of the Walker family," its website proudly points out. To some members of the Walker clan, that's just the problem. A dissident branch of Walker heirs who are F&M Bank shareholders -- led by Marcus Walker, one of C.J.'s great-grandsons -- is challenging the management of the closely held bank headed by his uncle, Chief Executive and President Kenneth G. Walker.
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BUSINESS
March 18, 2004 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
Farmers & Merchants Bank of Long Beach is a community bank founded nearly a century ago by C.J. Walker that is still "in the hands of the Walker family," its website proudly points out. To some members of the Walker clan, that's just the problem. A dissident branch of Walker heirs who are F&M Bank shareholders -- led by Marcus Walker, one of C.J.'s great-grandsons -- is challenging the management of the closely held bank headed by his uncle, Chief Executive and President Kenneth G. Walker.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1998 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When, after several days of trying, Madam C. J. Walker was finally allowed to speak at a 1912 convention of mostly male business owners, she described herself as a woman who started in the cotton fields of the South, was promoted to the washtub and finally promoted herself into manufacturing. Walker, the first female African American millionaire, just got another promotion: onto a first-class U.S. postage stamp. The 21st stamp in the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2003 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
Of all the disciplines of writing, biography is commonly regarded as the most black and white. What is there to interpret in the records of a lifetime? How can conjecture arise out of fact? Such an impression is only heightened by the intimidating size of so many biographies, their bibliographies and citations, their weight and heft.
BOOKS
April 27, 2003 | Kevin Baker, Kevin Baker is the author of "Paradise Alley," a historical novel about the Civil War draft riots in New York City.
Of all the great American stories of reinvention and rags to riches, none is more unlikely than that of Madam C.J. Walker. Born Sarah Breedlove to freed slaves sharecropping a dismal patch in Louisiana just after the Civil War, she was orphaned at 7 and spent the next three decades eking out a living as a washerwoman and domestic servant.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2003 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
Of all the disciplines of writing, biography is commonly regarded as the most black and white. What is there to interpret in the records of a lifetime? How can conjecture arise out of fact? Such an impression is only heightened by the intimidating size of so many biographies, their bibliographies and citations, their weight and heft.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2000
While I was pleased that The Times featured the Mark Taper Forum's Blacksmyths reading series as an activity ("Itinerary: Juneteenth," by Robin Rauzi, June 15), I was disheartened to see that I was not credited as the author of "The Mahogany Millionaire: The Life and Times of Madame C.J. Walker." While all the other playwrights in the series were mentioned with their plays, my name was conspicuously absent. I have spent lots of time and energy crafting my play, and feel I deserve to receive credit when it is featured, promoted or advertised.
NEWS
February 15, 1999 | BARBARA THOMAS
Madam C.J. Walker is the answer to a lot of trivia questions: Who was the first self-made woman millionaire? Who was one of the first to form a network of cosmetics saleswomen? In this 80th anniversary year of her death, Walker is still making news. Last year, the cosmetics giant's portrait appeared on a commemorative stamp. This month, Home and Garden TV will feature her mansion. And next year, Scribner will publish a biography of Walker and her illustrious daughter, A'Lelia Walker Robinson.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | Associated Press
Alex Haley's widow has won a share of his estate and the right to complete his two unfinished books. "It's a glorious day, is what it is," Myran Haley said after the verdict Tuesday. The completion of both works would be "a dream come true," she added. Haley, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "Roots: The Saga of an American Family," died in 1992 at age 70.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1995 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Only 75 years ago, after decades of bitter struggle, women finally won the right to vote. Today only a minority of Americans, men and women, choose to exercise their voting rights. That fact gives "Susan B. Anthony Slept Here," tonight's chirpy celebration of the passing of the 19th Amendment, an ironic resonance. "20/20" reporter Lynn Sherr hosts the show, which is based on the book she co-wrote with Jurate Kazickas.
BOOKS
April 27, 2003 | Kevin Baker, Kevin Baker is the author of "Paradise Alley," a historical novel about the Civil War draft riots in New York City.
Of all the great American stories of reinvention and rags to riches, none is more unlikely than that of Madam C.J. Walker. Born Sarah Breedlove to freed slaves sharecropping a dismal patch in Louisiana just after the Civil War, she was orphaned at 7 and spent the next three decades eking out a living as a washerwoman and domestic servant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1998 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When, after several days of trying, Madam C. J. Walker was finally allowed to speak at a 1912 convention of mostly male business owners, she described herself as a woman who started in the cotton fields of the South, was promoted to the washtub and finally promoted herself into manufacturing. Walker, the first female African American millionaire, just got another promotion: onto a first-class U.S. postage stamp. The 21st stamp in the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2008 | Diane Haithman
PSYCHOLOGIST Patricia Heaston of Chicago has spent decades collecting articles left behind by past generations of African Americans to further her study of how black children develop their self-image. But it was not until January that Heaston discovered the historical significance of two of these items: a white cap once worn by a Pullman Co. porter and a pin bearing the image of a black woman. That's when she brought the cap and pin to the inaugural event of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture's ongoing program "Save Our African American Treasures" at the Chicago Public Library.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2011 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
A member of the founding family of Farmers & Merchants Bank has pleaded guilty to stealing nearly $2 million from a customer's account. Matthew J. Walker, who managed the bank's Laguna Hills branch, entered the guilty plea before U.S. District Judge Andrew J. Guilford in Santa Ana. Walker's attorney said he squandered the stolen money on a failed investment. Walker, 34, admitted to stealing the money by taking advances from a customer's line of credit during a 16-month period during 2009 and 2010.
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