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C Michael Armstrong

BUSINESS
May 3, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
AT&T Corp. Chief Executive C. Michael Armstrong got some good news on a day when the company warned of lower profit and its shares plummeted: He's being honored for his leadership. Commerce Secretary Bill Daley will present Armstrong with the nonprofit Private Sector Council's award today for his work to create good relations between business and government. Rep. Bill Archer (R-Texas) also will receive a leadership award at a dinner at the Park Hyatt Hotel in Washington.
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BUSINESS
July 8, 2002 | Reuters
Despite some missteps and retrenchments, AT&T Corp. Chairman C. Michael Armstrong will declare victory this week after battling for more than four years to lead the telephone company through an industry boom and bust that has claimed several rivals as casualties. Armstrong , who became chairman in October 1997, shifted 125-year-old AT&T away from its shrinking long-distance telephone business, giving once-dowdy "Ma Bell" a chance at a future with high-speed data and Internet services.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1997 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
AT&T Corp.'s board of directors met Wednesday to ponder the selection of a new chief executive--a pivotal decision that could determine the future direction of the beleaguered phone giant--but broke up without an announcement. Speculation on a successor to Robert E. Allen has focused largely on two contenders--insider John D. Zeglis, AT&T vice chairman, and outsider C. Michael Armstrong, chief executive of Hughes Electronics Corp., a Los Angeles-based unit of General Motors Corp.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1997 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the five years since he took over as chairman and chief executive of Hughes Electronics Corp., C. Michael Armstrong has restructured the General Motors unit from a technology company focused on the defense and automotive industries into a leading player in the high-flying world of telecommunications. Now, with Armstrong expected to depart to head AT&T, it will be up to his likely successor, Michael T.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2001 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When AT&T Corp. named C. Michael Armstrong chief executive in late 1997, board members hailed the selection as "a perfect match" and a choice that would ensure the phone company's "continuing leadership in this dynamic industry well into the next century." Today, a mere 3 1/2 years later, Armstrong instead seems destined to preside over the potential demise of the once-proud telecommunications giant. The unsolicited bid from cable rival Comcast Corp.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his first public meeting with Wall Street since taking control of AT&T, Chairman and Chief Executive C. Michael Armstrong laid out a bold plan for the troubled telecommunications giant that involves expanding the company's core businesses while laying off up to 18,000 employees to cut costs.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
C. Michael Armstrong, the recently appointed chairman of Hughes Aircraft, is a newcomer to the defense business. But he reckons he doesn't need to know much about missiles and military procedures to handle the job today: "I know how to lay off and how to abandon facilities. I have no problem downsizing," says the former IBM executive.
NEWS
October 18, 1997 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
AT & T Corp. is expected to announce Monday that Los Angeles aerospace executive C. Michael Armstrong of Hughes Electronics Corp. will become its chief executive, officials close to the two companies said Friday. Armstrong, who is widely credited with shifting Hughes from a military to a commercial footing, will face another difficult task at AT & T: restoring the industry leadership that the long-distance giant has allowed to slip away.
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