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NEWS
February 22, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS and MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In 10 years, C. Michael Greene has transformed the Grammy Awards from a minor industry ritual into the global television event airing Wednesday night before an audience of 1.5 billion. Along the way, the 49-year-old Greene, chief executive of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, has transformed himself into one of the most powerful and controversial figures in the music industry. Once a struggling Atlanta saxophonist, Greene now lives in a $1.
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BUSINESS
April 30, 2002 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a quiet, little-known record producer from Nashville who united the Grammy board to oust powerful President C. Michael Greene. Grammy Chairman Garth Fundis had been among Greene's strongest supporters until this month, when he decided to call an emergency board meeting to address sexual harassment allegations against the controversial Grammy chief.
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BUSINESS
September 11, 2001 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Grammy organization is investigating an accusation that its president, C. Michael Greene, assaulted a female executive whose job was an outgrowth of similar allegations of abusive behavior by Greene. Attorneys for Grammy executive Jill Marie Geimer accused Greene of sexual harassment and battery in a July 25 letter to the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, the nonprofit group responsible for staging tonight's worldwide telecast of the Latin Grammy Awards on CBS-TV.
NEWS
April 28, 2002 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
C. Michael Greene, the executive who transformed the Grammy Music Awards from a minor industry ritual into a global television event, resigned Saturday night amid questions over his personal behavior and his leadership at the organization, Grammy sources said. Greene's resignation as president took place during an emergency board meeting at the Beverly Hilton Hotel to discuss a sexual harassment probe commissioned by the Grammy organization, the sources said.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last decade, C. Michael Greene has built a mighty power base as head of the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, the not-for-profit group that stages the annual Grammy Awards show. The once-struggling musician drives a Mercedes-Benz, enjoys a membership at the Bel-Air Country Club and makes $1.3 million a year--all at the expense of the academy and its charitable arms.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2001 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The board of the Grammy organization has approved an estimated $650,000 settlement to resolve sexual assault and battery allegations against the nonprofit group's chief executive, C. Michael Greene, Grammy sources said. Greene and his attorney did not respond to repeated phone calls or e-mails Friday. Attorneys representing the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, the Santa Monica-based group responsible for staging the annual Grammy awards telecast, also declined comment.
NEWS
April 28, 2002 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
C. Michael Greene, the executive who transformed the Grammy Music Awards from a minor industry ritual into a global television event, resigned Saturday night amid questions over his personal behavior and his leadership at the organization, Grammy sources said. Greene's resignation as president took place during an emergency board meeting at the Beverly Hilton Hotel to discuss a sexual harassment probe commissioned by the Grammy organization, the sources said.
NEWS
September 10, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS and MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Breaking new ground in the nonprofit world, the Grammy organization last year awarded its chief executive, C. Michael Greene, an unusual bonus of $707,810--nearly doubling his annual compensation to $1.5 million.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2001 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High-ranking officials of the Grammy organization will recommend this month a settlement of more than half a million dollars to resolve sexual assault and battery allegations against the nonprofit group's chief executive, C. Michael Greene, Grammy sources said.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2002 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a quiet, little-known record producer from Nashville who united the Grammy board to oust powerful President C. Michael Greene. Grammy Chairman Garth Fundis had been among Greene's strongest supporters until this month, when he decided to call an emergency board meeting to address sexual harassment allegations against the controversial Grammy chief.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2001 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The board of the Grammy organization has approved an estimated $650,000 settlement to resolve sexual assault and battery allegations against the nonprofit group's chief executive, C. Michael Greene, Grammy sources said. Greene and his attorney did not respond to repeated phone calls or e-mails Friday. Attorneys representing the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, the Santa Monica-based group responsible for staging the annual Grammy awards telecast, also declined comment.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2001 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High-ranking officials of the Grammy organization will recommend this month a settlement of more than half a million dollars to resolve sexual assault and battery allegations against the nonprofit group's chief executive, C. Michael Greene, Grammy sources said.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2001 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Grammy organization is investigating an accusation that its president, C. Michael Greene, assaulted a female executive whose job was an outgrowth of similar allegations of abusive behavior by Greene. Attorneys for Grammy executive Jill Marie Geimer accused Greene of sexual harassment and battery in a July 25 letter to the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, the nonprofit group responsible for staging tonight's worldwide telecast of the Latin Grammy Awards on CBS-TV.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last decade, C. Michael Greene has built a mighty power base as head of the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, the not-for-profit group that stages the annual Grammy Awards show. The once-struggling musician drives a Mercedes-Benz, enjoys a membership at the Bel-Air Country Club and makes $1.3 million a year--all at the expense of the academy and its charitable arms.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Grammy chief C. Michael Greene last month told media giant Time Warner to be prepared for "short and long term ramifications" for refusing to contribute songs to a charitable fund-raising CD sponsored by the organization.
NEWS
September 10, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS and MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Breaking new ground in the nonprofit world, the Grammy organization last year awarded its chief executive, C. Michael Greene, an unusual bonus of $707,810--nearly doubling his annual compensation to $1.5 million.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Grammy chief C. Michael Greene last month told media giant Time Warner to be prepared for "short and long term ramifications" for refusing to contribute songs to a charitable fund-raising CD sponsored by the organization.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS and MICHAEL A HILTZIK
The leadership of the Grammy organization came under new pressure Monday as the trustees of its influential Nashville chapter raised questions about potential conflicts of interest on the part of the nonprofit group's chairman, Phil Ramone. Among the conflicts causing concern in the chapter, according to sources, are Ramone's close association with Grammy chief C. Michael Greene, whose management was examined recently in a series of articles in The Times.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS and MICHAEL A HILTZIK
The leadership of the Grammy organization came under new pressure Monday as the trustees of its influential Nashville chapter raised questions about potential conflicts of interest on the part of the nonprofit group's chairman, Phil Ramone. Among the conflicts causing concern in the chapter, according to sources, are Ramone's close association with Grammy chief C. Michael Greene, whose management was examined recently in a series of articles in The Times.
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS and MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In 10 years, C. Michael Greene has transformed the Grammy Awards from a minor industry ritual into the global television event airing Wednesday night before an audience of 1.5 billion. Along the way, the 49-year-old Greene, chief executive of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, has transformed himself into one of the most powerful and controversial figures in the music industry. Once a struggling Atlanta saxophonist, Greene now lives in a $1.
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