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NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By David G. Savage
The C-SPAN network, which has tried without success for more than 20 years to bring the Supreme Court into the TV era, is trying again. A day after the high court announced it would hear more than five hours of oral arguments in March to decide the constitutionality of President Obama's healthcare law, C-SPAN asked permission to televise the proceeding. “We believe the public interest is best served by live television coverage of this particular oral argument,” Brian P. Lamb, C-SPAN's chief executive, said in a letter to Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. “It is a case which will affect every American's life, our economy and will certainly be an issue in the upcoming presidential campaign.” The public affairs network has broadcast proceedings of the House and Senate since the 1980s.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Say what you will about Vice President Joe Biden - the man can deliver a eulogy. Just ask him. “I've spoken at more eulogies than I'd like to remember,” he said Wednesday at a service for Frank R. Lautenberg, the late Democratic senator from New Jersey and Biden's former colleague. “I advise you all … Never make a good eulogy.  You'll be asked again and again and again.” In the past, the role of a vice president has often been dismissed as one limited to casting tie-breaking votes in the Senate and attending funerals of dignitaries and foreign heads of state.
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NATIONAL
January 23, 2011 | By Andrew Malcolm, Los Angeles Times
Those Ticket readers who memorize all of our items will recall that in November, we wrote about new House Speaker John A. Boehner's efforts to dramatize how differently his Republicans would run the people's House from the way it was operated by the previous crowd ousted in the Nov. 2 midterm elections. The visionary founder of C-SPAN, Brian Lamb, took the occasion of those election upsets to plead with the Ohioan that finally, after all these years, C-SPAN's independent TV cameras be allowed in for daily coverage of the proceedings.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2012 | By August Brown
Journalist Martha Raddatz was widely praised for her moderation of the pugnacious vice presidential debate between Joe Biden and Paul Ryan last night. But perhaps her most unexpected accolades came from Chamillionaire, the Houston rapper who made a cameo in Raddatz's pre-debate remarks on C-SPAN. Raddatz was giving the audience at Centre College in Kentucky some ground rules for attending the debate, when she recounted a story of how once, while reporting from a White House briefing, her cellphone rang in front of the crowd of journalists and White House staffers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2010 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
C-SPAN's new digital bus has hit the streets of Los Angeles. The cable television network, funded by cable and satellite TV affiliates, uses buses to visit schools and communities. Unlike other networks, C-SPAN doesn't "have personalities or ratings," said Chief Executive Brian Lamb, "so we were trying to devise something we could take around the country to explain what we do." Two original buses were retired this month, having traveled more than 1 million miles. The new digital bus allows for more interactivity and includes SMARTboard technology, webcams and computer kiosks with access to the network's video library, including interviews with more than 115,000 people.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2010 | By Andrew Malcolm and Craig Howie, Los Angeles Times
C-SPAN, as everyone knows, is a 31-year-old living national treasure financed by cable companies whose letters stand for Comprehensive-Substantive Programming Ad Nauseum. No "Speaking Like the Stars" contests on C-SPAN's three channels. In modern Washington, C-SPAN has become the de facto national sedative for sanity in a hectic verbal swamp seething with name-callers and screamers. Keith Olbermann wouldn't even be allowed to buy decaf in C-SPAN's cafeteria. When Armageddon occurs, C-SPAN will televise the mushroom clouds while taking viewer reactions to the end of civilization on phone lines for Republicans, Democrats and Independents.
NEWS
May 3, 1993 | GEORGE SKELTON
Television viewers are watching a heated legislative debate over whether to cut funding for the Coastal Commission or the Conservation Corps when suddenly the lawmakers vanish. The screen fills with canned film of the California Capitol, flags fluttering. And then there is an abrupt switch to Lexington, Ky., for "Festival '92, the Pony Club Adventure." On another day, a committee hearing on automobile insurance seems to instantly transform into a Portuguese soccer match.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2004 | From Associated Press
Vice President Dick Cheney said Wednesday he cannot envision any circumstance in which he would not run for a second term, saying President Bush has been "very clear he doesn't want to break up the team." There has been persistent speculation that Cheney would step down for political or health reasons. "He's made his decision," Cheney said of Bush. "I've made mine.
OPINION
June 19, 2010 | Patt Morrison
People have mistaken him for John McCain. People have mistakenly thought he's been off the airwaves for years. And inside the Beltway, where egos are the size of Montgolfier balloons, Brian Lamb doesn't have a problem with any of that. The founder and CEO of C-SPAN believes that if he can't retire from the airwaves without a big fuss by viewers, the channel isn't the no-star vehicle he designed it to be. C-SPAN began in 1979 with a no-brand brand: all governing, all the time, no jokes, no spin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2000
Re NBC's Olympics coverage: Any chance of C-SPAN covering the Olympics? ALAN CRAWFORD Arcadia
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By David G. Savage
The C-SPAN network, which has tried without success for more than 20 years to bring the Supreme Court into the TV era, is trying again. A day after the high court announced it would hear more than five hours of oral arguments in March to decide the constitutionality of President Obama's healthcare law, C-SPAN asked permission to televise the proceeding. “We believe the public interest is best served by live television coverage of this particular oral argument,” Brian P. Lamb, C-SPAN's chief executive, said in a letter to Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. “It is a case which will affect every American's life, our economy and will certainly be an issue in the upcoming presidential campaign.” The public affairs network has broadcast proceedings of the House and Senate since the 1980s.
NATIONAL
February 13, 2011 | By Andrew Malcolm, Los Angeles Times
Finally, some bipartisan agreement in the House of Representatives. The new speaker of the House, Republican John A. Boehner, has agreed with the former speaker of the House, Democrat Nancy Pelosi. Their point of agreement: Neither one wants independent television cameras prowling their lenses all over the House sessions. It's a transparent issue of transparency. Federal pols love to talk about it. Remember all those Barack Obama-Joe Biden promises about historic governmental transparency and how the healthcare legislative negotiations would be on C-SPAN?
NATIONAL
January 23, 2011 | By Andrew Malcolm, Los Angeles Times
Those Ticket readers who memorize all of our items will recall that in November, we wrote about new House Speaker John A. Boehner's efforts to dramatize how differently his Republicans would run the people's House from the way it was operated by the previous crowd ousted in the Nov. 2 midterm elections. The visionary founder of C-SPAN, Brian Lamb, took the occasion of those election upsets to plead with the Ohioan that finally, after all these years, C-SPAN's independent TV cameras be allowed in for daily coverage of the proceedings.
OPINION
December 7, 2010 | Tim Rutten
There are ample reasons to be skeptical about the desirability of cameras in the courtroom, most of them turning on broadcasters' propensity to train their glassy gaze only on the most lurid or sensational trials. As well founded in experience as those reservations may be, Monday's broadcast of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals' hearing in the Proposition 8 case was a powerfully compelling argument for the camera's indispensability when the issues at stake are as broadly consequential and as deeply divisive as they are in the struggle over marriage equality.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2010 | By Andrew Malcolm and Craig Howie, Los Angeles Times
C-SPAN, as everyone knows, is a 31-year-old living national treasure financed by cable companies whose letters stand for Comprehensive-Substantive Programming Ad Nauseum. No "Speaking Like the Stars" contests on C-SPAN's three channels. In modern Washington, C-SPAN has become the de facto national sedative for sanity in a hectic verbal swamp seething with name-callers and screamers. Keith Olbermann wouldn't even be allowed to buy decaf in C-SPAN's cafeteria. When Armageddon occurs, C-SPAN will televise the mushroom clouds while taking viewer reactions to the end of civilization on phone lines for Republicans, Democrats and Independents.
OPINION
June 19, 2010 | Patt Morrison
People have mistaken him for John McCain. People have mistakenly thought he's been off the airwaves for years. And inside the Beltway, where egos are the size of Montgolfier balloons, Brian Lamb doesn't have a problem with any of that. The founder and CEO of C-SPAN believes that if he can't retire from the airwaves without a big fuss by viewers, the channel isn't the no-star vehicle he designed it to be. C-SPAN began in 1979 with a no-brand brand: all governing, all the time, no jokes, no spin.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1988
President Reagan's State of the Union address will be televised live at 6 tonight on ABC, CBS, NBC and on cable's CNN and C-SPAN. Radio coverage airs at 6 p.m. on KCRW-FM (89.9), KFWB (980), KGIL (1260 AM), KNX (1070), KPCC-FM (89.3), KPFK-FM (90.7). In addition, C-SPAN will also have tape-delayed coverage at 8:30 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1993
I watched a portion of the gay and lesbian march on C-Span. Let me first say that in my long business career I have worked side by side with gays and lesbians. These individuals were a pleasure to work with, were highly productive and lived their lives with dignity and pride. What I witnessed on C-Span was revolting and disgusting. The body language--the obscene signs--the words used in the songs sung by all in the audience and on the stage for national TV viewers--leads me to believe that the march was a disaster for the hopes and objectives of the gay and lesbian community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2010 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
C-SPAN's new digital bus has hit the streets of Los Angeles. The cable television network, funded by cable and satellite TV affiliates, uses buses to visit schools and communities. Unlike other networks, C-SPAN doesn't "have personalities or ratings," said Chief Executive Brian Lamb, "so we were trying to devise something we could take around the country to explain what we do." Two original buses were retired this month, having traveled more than 1 million miles. The new digital bus allows for more interactivity and includes SMARTboard technology, webcams and computer kiosks with access to the network's video library, including interviews with more than 115,000 people.
SPORTS
February 13, 2008 | Lance Pugmire
Age: 45. College: Texas. Hometown: Katy, Texas Denied claims made by McNamee to investigators working for former Sen. George Mitchell that he had used steroids and human growth hormone. Clemens maintains he received injections only of vitamin B-12 and pain-relieving lidocaine from McNamee. Could face perjury investigation if Congress or Justice Department officials come away unsatisfied with the legitimacy of his denials of drug use.
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