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C Span Television Network

ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1991 | RICK DU BROW
The stopwatch war didn't start on time. But probably never have TV viewers been so plugged-in to strategies, emotions and propaganda as they mounted in last-ditch maneuvering over the gulf crisis Tuesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1993 | STEVEN HERBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although President Clinton has been in office for only five months and the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary won't be held until February, 1996, C-SPAN has already begun its coverage of the next presidential campaign. Cable television's commercial-free public-affairs network launched "Road to the White House '96" last month. Airing the first Sunday of each month, the second 90-minute edition arrives Sunday at 6:30 p.m. (with a repeat at 9:30 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1992 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the broadcast networks wrestle with hours and ways of covering the Democratic National Convention on prime-time TV this week, C-SPAN, the TV network beloved by policy wonks and congressional-hearings junkies everywhere, will be in its usual element: providing gavel-to-gavel coverage of everything that moves at the podium--and a lot that doesn't--with no editing, no commercials, no high-priced political commentators and no famous TV anchors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1996
A big yellow bus pulled onto the Santa Monica High School campus Thursday. That wouldn't be unusual except that the interior of the vehicle was equipped with television monitors, cameras and production equipment instead of the usual vinyl seats. Known as the C-Span School Bus, the $750,000 vehicle is a production studio on wheels that is operated by the cable network and has made stops at schools and civic organizations in nearly every state.
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Democrats Thursday backed off a plan to strictly limit the after-hours floor speeches that have become a vehicle used by some Republican members to savage political opponents on cable television. Instead, members of the House Democratic Caucus withdrew the proposal to restrict so-called "special order" speeches and referred the controversial issue to a bipartisan study committee. The compromise was first suggested Wednesday by House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel (R-Ill.).
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Morning after morning as the 102nd Congress and the 1992 campaign draw to a close, lawmakers have lined up on the floor of the House of Representatives to heap epithets on the opposition party's presidential nominee. They do so because they have discovered an irresistible combination--House rules that permit members one minute apiece at the start of the day to talk about anything that strikes their fancy, and an ever-growing audience of C-SPAN cable TV viewers who watch Congress live.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1995
Before the lemon-yellow school bus bearing the blue C-SPAN logo arrived at Millikan Middle School in Van Nuys, eighth-grader Lupe Romo hadn't even heard of the Cable Satellite Public Affairs Network, let alone watched it. But after touring the 45-foot-long television studio on wheels and seeing the three television cameras, the eight-channel audio board, the fax machine, the studio lights and the two laser disc players, Lupe delivered a verdict. "It's cool," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2000 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No-nonsense C-SPAN may be the closest thing television viewers can get to impartial, straightforward gavel-to-gavel coverage of the official Republican National Convention podium action. But for viewers who worry that even C-SPAN may be distorting the picture, the cable network has a solution: a camera in the C-SPAN control room pointed over the shoulder of the person directing the C-SPAN coverage.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | MARC LACEY
It's 4 a.m. in California and alarm clocks are blaring across the state as a special breed of early risers scrambles out of bed for a morning fix. Yes, it's time for a bit of crack-of-dawn video democracy. C-SPAN's "Washington Journal" show, a serious, early morning chat-fest that has hooked political junkies from coast to coast, begins at the more decent hour of 7 a.m. in the nation's capital.
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