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C Span Television Network

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1997 | JENNIFER LEUER
To Cypress High School Principal Tracy Brennan, the Friday morning tour of the C-SPAN School Bus was like a trip to a Hollywood movie studio. "The way it's decorated, the cameras, the TV screens and computers--there's so much in there," said a wide-eyed Brennan as she enthusiastically jumped off the bus steps with her students. "It's like going to Disneyland for me."
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NEWS
December 13, 1996 | MARC LACEY
It's 4 a.m. in California and alarm clocks are blaring across the state as a special breed of early risers scrambles out of bed for a morning fix. Yes, it's time for a bit of crack-of-dawn video democracy. C-SPAN's "Washington Journal" show, a serious, early morning chat-fest that has hooked political junkies from coast to coast, begins at the more decent hour of 7 a.m. in the nation's capital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1996 | TRACY JOHNSON
The C-SPAN School Bus went to the Republican National Convention in San Diego over the summer and went back last week to catch the presidential debate. On Tuesday it stopped at Peninsula High School in Rolling Hills Estates to teach students and community members about how the political network operates. The school bus, an interactive mobile station filled with computers and television cameras, was launched in 1993 to educate viewers about politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1996 | KIMBERLY BROWER
Aliso Niguel High School seniors will get a technology lesson today when the C-SPAN School Bus rolls in for a tutorial. The C-SPAN Campaign '96 Open House, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., will focus on how political campaign advertising, education and technology interact. During the open house, students will tour the C-SPAN bus and be introduced to its state-of-the-art technology, which includes a mobile classroom and video production studio housed in a 45-foot, bright yellow custom coach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1996
A big yellow bus pulled onto the Santa Monica High School campus Thursday. That wouldn't be unusual except that the interior of the vehicle was equipped with television monitors, cameras and production equipment instead of the usual vinyl seats. Known as the C-Span School Bus, the $750,000 vehicle is a production studio on wheels that is operated by the cable network and has made stops at schools and civic organizations in nearly every state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1995 | KATE FOLMAR
Before the lemon-yellow school bus bearing the blue C-SPAN logo arrived at Millikan Middle School, eighth-grader Lupe Romo hadn't even heard of the Cable Satellite Public Affairs Network, let alone watched it. But after touring the 45-foot-long television studio on wheels and seeing the three television cameras, the eight-channel audio board, the fax machine, the studio lights and the two laser disc players, Lupe delivered a verdict. "It's cool," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1995
Before the lemon-yellow school bus bearing the blue C-SPAN logo arrived at Millikan Middle School in Van Nuys, eighth-grader Lupe Romo hadn't even heard of the Cable Satellite Public Affairs Network, let alone watched it. But after touring the 45-foot-long television studio on wheels and seeing the three television cameras, the eight-channel audio board, the fax machine, the studio lights and the two laser disc players, Lupe delivered a verdict. "It's cool," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1994 | HOLLY J. WAGNER
More than 100 local high school students got a look at how the news is produced Tuesday when the C-SPAN Bus rolled into Newport Beach on its national educational tour. The 45-foot motor coach functions as a mobile television studio, classroom and promotion for the government affairs cable channel. It has been touring the country for a year, visiting campuses nationwide to spark student interest in news and in government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1993 | BERT ELJERA
Residents are circulating a petition demanding that the local cable television company restore 24-hour broadcasting of public affairs and other government-related issues. Donna McDonnalltold the City Council this week that Paragon Cable has "severely curtailed" C-Span 1 broadcasts since early this month. She said broadcast is now limited to a few hours a day, instead of 24 hours as in the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1993 | STEVEN HERBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although President Clinton has been in office for only five months and the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary won't be held until February, 1996, C-SPAN has already begun its coverage of the next presidential campaign. Cable television's commercial-free public-affairs network launched "Road to the White House '96" last month. Airing the first Sunday of each month, the second 90-minute edition arrives Sunday at 6:30 p.m. (with a repeat at 9:30 p.m.).
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