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C Span Television Network

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1995 | KATE FOLMAR
Before the lemon-yellow school bus bearing the blue C-SPAN logo arrived at Millikan Middle School, eighth-grader Lupe Romo hadn't even heard of the Cable Satellite Public Affairs Network, let alone watched it. But after touring the 45-foot-long television studio on wheels and seeing the three television cameras, the eight-channel audio board, the fax machine, the studio lights and the two laser disc players, Lupe delivered a verdict. "It's cool," she said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1995
Before the lemon-yellow school bus bearing the blue C-SPAN logo arrived at Millikan Middle School in Van Nuys, eighth-grader Lupe Romo hadn't even heard of the Cable Satellite Public Affairs Network, let alone watched it. But after touring the 45-foot-long television studio on wheels and seeing the three television cameras, the eight-channel audio board, the fax machine, the studio lights and the two laser disc players, Lupe delivered a verdict. "It's cool," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1994 | HOLLY J. WAGNER
More than 100 local high school students got a look at how the news is produced Tuesday when the C-SPAN Bus rolled into Newport Beach on its national educational tour. The 45-foot motor coach functions as a mobile television studio, classroom and promotion for the government affairs cable channel. It has been touring the country for a year, visiting campuses nationwide to spark student interest in news and in government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1993 | BERT ELJERA
Residents are circulating a petition demanding that the local cable television company restore 24-hour broadcasting of public affairs and other government-related issues. Donna McDonnalltold the City Council this week that Paragon Cable has "severely curtailed" C-Span 1 broadcasts since early this month. She said broadcast is now limited to a few hours a day, instead of 24 hours as in the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1993 | STEVEN HERBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although President Clinton has been in office for only five months and the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary won't be held until February, 1996, C-SPAN has already begun its coverage of the next presidential campaign. Cable television's commercial-free public-affairs network launched "Road to the White House '96" last month. Airing the first Sunday of each month, the second 90-minute edition arrives Sunday at 6:30 p.m. (with a repeat at 9:30 p.m.).
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Democrats Thursday backed off a plan to strictly limit the after-hours floor speeches that have become a vehicle used by some Republican members to savage political opponents on cable television. Instead, members of the House Democratic Caucus withdrew the proposal to restrict so-called "special order" speeches and referred the controversial issue to a bipartisan study committee. The compromise was first suggested Wednesday by House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel (R-Ill.).
NEWS
December 10, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON and ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a move that drew cries of outrage from Republicans, the House Democratic majority decided Wednesday to limit after-hours televised speeches by members of Congress to three hours a day divided equally between the two major parties. The Democratic plan, which also would impose a 6 p.m. PST curfew on the previously unlimited "special orders" broadcast by the C-SPAN network, sailed through the party's caucus by a vote of 174 to 35.
NEWS
November 30, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Republicans are bitterly contesting a plan by Democrats to cut short the lengthy, late-night floor speeches, televised on C-SPAN, that have become popular as tools to savage political opponents. The dispute over "special order" speeches is a clash between the House's Democratic leaders, flush with their party's presidential victory, and minority Republicans who can no longer count on White House support in their battles. In a recent letter, House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel (R-Ill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Republicans are fuming over a plan by House Democrats to cut short the lengthy, late-night floor speeches, televised on C-SPAN, that have become popular with Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-Garden Grove) and others as tools to savage political opponents.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Morning after morning as the 102nd Congress and the 1992 campaign draw to a close, lawmakers have lined up on the floor of the House of Representatives to heap epithets on the opposition party's presidential nominee. They do so because they have discovered an irresistible combination--House rules that permit members one minute apiece at the start of the day to talk about anything that strikes their fancy, and an ever-growing audience of C-SPAN cable TV viewers who watch Congress live.
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