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Cabernet Sauvignon

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FOOD
March 22, 2000 | S. IRENE VIRBILA
Here's a high-end Napa Valley Cabernet, made in fairly small quantities (only about 1,500 cases), that hasn't gone completely crazy with its prices. Tightly knit, lovely from the first sip, it isn't shy about showing its quality. With its taste of plums, cassis and blackberries, its soft tannins and seductive, dusty nose, it's delicious drinking now and should get even better with time.
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NEWS
October 22, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
The harvest is almost finished in Napa Valley and in terms of quantity, it's turning out to be an average year. In terms of quality, though, winemakers are pretty much ecstatic about the 2013 vintage.  Bo Barrett of Chateau Montelena says it was like the good old days, “really great fruit and basically no headaches at all. If we could have ordered the weather a la carte, we couldn't have had it any better.” Often vintages come in...
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FOOD
February 12, 1997 | S. IRENE VIRBILA
Chile's winegrowing regions offer some bargains, especially for claret-like Cabernet Sauvignons. Villarica's "La Nobleza" Cabernet from the Colchagua Valley south of Santiago is a case in point. Deep ruby, with smooth tannins and ripe but not jam-like fruit, it has a modest price that belies its understated grace. A cut above most Chilean wines, and one that would please a good many tastes.
FOOD
May 18, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
  The term "Rosso Toscano" usually indicates an inexpensive wine made for everyday drinking. But in this case, the wine is essentially a Super Tuscan, made from a blend of Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Petit Verdot. Not a drop of Sangiovese, but it's unmistakably Tuscan - intense and concentrated, with a seductive tonal palate and enough body and tannic grip to age and evolve. And hard to resist now. This is a great red for barbecue season, with the stuff to stand up to smoke and char.
FOOD
February 8, 1990 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
The scene two weeks ago Saturday was curious: people lined up to buy wine at the tiny Heitz Wine Cellars tasting room in the heart of the Napa Valley. The wine they wanted cost $50 a bottle. Meanwhile, across Highway 29, another group of people was meandering into the tasting room at Sutter Home Winery. The wine they sought sells for $5 a bottle. Both groups appeared equally happy at the prospect.
FOOD
December 31, 1992 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
The best American Cabernets I tasted this year were 1989 Leonetti Cellar from Washington ($25) and 1988 Grace Family Vineyard ($60). The former is amazingly fruity and complex, the latter richer and denser. Close on their heels were 1987 Caymus Vineyards "Special Selection" ($60), 1988 The Terraces ($38), 1987 Simi Winery "Reserve" ($30), 1988 Beringer Vineyards "Private Reserve" ($35) and 1989 S. Anderson Vineyard "Chambers" ($42). All are in short supply, if not sold out.
FOOD
July 31, 1986 | NATHAN CHROMAN, Chroman is a free-lance wine writer and author who also practices law in Beverly Hills
The genuine star of the recent Napa Valley Wine Auction was not the generous outpouring by bidders of more than $400,000 for lavishly packaged big monied bottles. Nor was it the three-day showering of hospitality at winery open houses. Rather it was the 1985 vintage with still-in-the-barrel Cabernet Sauvignons and Chardonnays that collectively may turn out to be the best since the fabled vintage of 1974.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1988 | KAREN ROEBUCK and What: Fifth Annual Redondo Beach California Wine Exposition. and Where: Seaside Lagoon, corner of North Harbor Drive and Portofino Way in King Harbor, Redondo Beach. and When: 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. and Admission: $17.50 in advance from the Redondo Beach Chamber of Commerce, (376-6911) 1215 N. Catalina Ave. Open 8:30 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. today. On Saturday, leave ticket order with a check in night chamber slot and pick up tickets at will-call on Sunday. Tickets $20 at gate. Only 1,000 tickets will be sold.
What could be better than a relaxing Sunday afternoon near the ocean with a companion, sipping wine and nibbling appetizers? If your answer is spending the afternoon at a lagoon with a 1,000 people, sampling from among 150 wines from 52 wineries and hors d'oeuvres from 16 local restaurants, then head to the Seaside Lagoon on Sunday for the Fifth Annual Redondo Beach California Wine Exposition. "We are probably the lowest-priced event in terms of what else I've seen.
FOOD
August 21, 1986 | NATHAN CHROMAN
No one seems to know for sure how many cases of wine the Gallo Winery produces annually. Some say more than 80 million cases, making it the largest wine producer in the world, even larger than some major wine-producing regions. If you ask the brothers Gallo, Ernest and Julio, they will politely evade the query; they would rather talk about their current single varietal Cabernet Sauvignon 1980 and their first vintage-dated Zinfandel 1981. The Gallos' reaction is understandable.
FOOD
July 9, 1987 | NATHAN CHROMAN, Chroman is a free-lance wine writer and author who also practices law in Beverly Hills
Vincenzo Cilurzo, a television lighting director, is fast acquiring a glittering reputation as a starred wine maker. Overcoming the bum rap that Temecula's Southern California vineyards cannot produce fine red wines, Cilurzo is fashioning his tiny winery into one of the region's best. Starting as an amateur home wine maker, Cilurzo is not academically trained, although he's taken a host of wine courses at the University of California at Davis, and the now-defunct Napa Valley School of Cellaring.
NEWS
February 23, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
Ha! I was just starting to write a post about Mira Winery in Napa Valley experimenting with aging wine in the ocean - yes, it's true! - when a video showing just what they're up to popped in my in-box. According to the winery, divers have placed four cases of the 2009 Cabernet Sauvignon in specially designed cages in Charleston Harbor. Why? Mira Winery president Jim "Bear" Dyke Jr. has Charleston, S.C., roots. "The South is beginning to really distinguish itself as a food and wine destination," he says on the two-minute YouTube video . Okay, but why put wines in the ocean?
BUSINESS
February 20, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
A California winery is conducting an aquatic experiment: Napa Valley-based Mira Winery is aging 48 bottles of Cabernet Sauvignon in the Atlantic Ocean. The winery said bottles of wine recovered from shipwrecks have a remarkable and unique flavor. Thus, the winemaker believes aging the 2009 Cabernet in South Carolina's Charleston Harbor will affect the red wine's taste. “The ocean has similar ideal elements that impact aging - temperature, pressure, humidity, pressure motion, light - or lack thereof - and oxygen,” said Gustavo Gonzalez, a Mira Winery winemaker, in a statement.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Jay Jones
After a nearly 40-year absence from restaurant wine lists, California's Inglenook label is poised for a comeback and plans to proclaim it at a wine-and-food pairing in Las Vegas . The Jan. 26  event, the first of Bellagio 's 2013 Epicurean Epicenter series , will be hosted by the celebrity team of Chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten , whose worldwide holdings include steakhouses at Bellagio and Aria, and Hollywood director Francis Ford...
FOOD
December 29, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
Christian Moueix and his winemaking team knock it out of the park with this moderately priced Napa Valley Cabernet. Made with just a touch (4%) of Petit Verdot, the 2009 Carpe Diem has impeccable balance; a silky texture; soft, rounded tannins; and, underneath it all, beautiful Napa Valley fruit. This is a Cabernet built not to dominate but to go with food. The quality may not be such a surprise from the owner of Chateau Pétrus in Bordeaux and Dominus in Napa Valley, but the price, about $25, certainly is. This one could hold its own against some of the valley's most lauded $100 bottles.
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila
If you're planning on heading to the nearest bookshop to snatch a copy of British wine writer and Financial Times columnist Jancis Robinson's new "Wine Grapes" as a gift for an oenophile friend, you'll need a little red wagon. Or a sherpa. The massive (and quite definitive) tome weighs in at more than 6½ pounds on my bathroom scale. But its 1,280 pages includes everything any wine lover will need to stump opponents in wine trivia games, ace the Master Sommelier test and exponentially increase his or her knowledge of ampelography (the field of botany concerned with the identification and classification of grapevines)
NEWS
October 2, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
On Wednesday, Oct. 10, Night + Market hosts a wine dinner -- or "anti-wine dinner" -- in its backyard herb garden, featuring petillant naturel wines (dry, fizzy wines made without added yeast or sugar) from Pascal Potaire.   " Pet-nat is French for awesome rustic fizzy fun wine topped with a beer cap," said Night + Market chef Kris Yenbamroong in a release.   Two pet-nats -- a white (100% Chardonnay) and a rosé (Cot and Gamay) -- along with Noella Morantin's Marie Rose (a Cabernet Sauvignon rosé)
FOOD
February 19, 1997
"I make only Cabernet Sauvignon, and about 95% of my cellar is Cabernet Sauvignon. I don't much like white wine, but I recently had the '94 Beringer reserve Chardonnay that Wine Spectator named best wine of the year, and it was very nice. And recently my employees gave me a bottle of '63 Quinta do Noval Port that was absolutely great. At 33 years old, in my eyes, this wine was just perfect."
BUSINESS
August 27, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Wine snobs don't hesitate even when the price is high. How do you put a price, after all, on a superior vino? But still - $168,000? Australian winemaker Penfolds released a wine last year that cost about $1,000 - an impressive sum. But that's nothing compared with its 2004 Kalimna Block 42 Cabernet Sauvignon, which is priced at, yes, $168,000. How can that possibly be the case? The Wall Street Journal asked just that question and found that one of the selling points is what Penfolds says is the world's oldest continually producing Cabernet vines, which have been coughing up grapes since the 1880s.
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