Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCabinet Choices
IN THE NEWS

Cabinet Choices

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1990
Has anyone ever noticed that Republican Presidents always appoint secretaries of labor who are anti-labor, but never appoint secretaries of defense who are anti-war? SCOTT PHILLIPS Norwalk
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
August 15, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Patrick J. McDonnell
TEHRAN - Iran's parliament handed a victory Thursday to new President Hassan Rouhani, approving 15 of his 18 proposed Cabinet ministers, including nominees to head the key ministries of oil and foreign affairs. The vote culminated four days of often rancorous discussions that were nationally televised. The debates represented a rare public airing of problems besetting the Islamic Republic, including corruption, economic malaise and environmental woes. Iranian officials lauded the proceedings as an example of transparent democracy at work in a region where political tumult and violence have dominated recent headlines.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1993
Clinton's Cabinet choices have been disappointing to say the least. Clinton's decision to discriminate against women and gays in his appointments as well as his decision to load his Cabinet with Establishment politicians makes one wonder if all of his campaign talk about "change" was just that, talk. THOMAS KLEM Playa del Rey
WORLD
January 17, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez
The Afghan parliament Saturday once again rejected the majority of President Hamid Karzai's choices for his Cabinet, a rebuke likely to unnerve an international community that desperately wants the Afghan leader to forge ahead with reform plans. The rejection of 10 of the 17 nominees means that Karzai will have to go back to parliament a third time to gain approval for his Cabinet choices, and raises questions about his political strength. After he presented his initial slate of 24 nominees Jan. 2, lawmakers rejected 17 of them.
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Polish Parliament approved the new Cabinet choices of Prime Minister Jan Krzysztof Bielecki. "Our program is the market economy," Bielecki told the chamber before it approved his 19-man Cabinet, which has only two members without ties to the Solidarity union. After a daylong debate, in which many of the 60 speakers attacked Bielecki's program, 272 Sejm (lower house) deputies voted to approve his Cabinet, four were against and 62 abstained.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | From Times wire services
Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov agreed today to withdraw the names of six of his Cabinet choices who were not endorsed by legislative committees, marking the first time in Soviet history that a Parliament has rejected high government candidates. Ryzhkov, acknowledging that the revamped Supreme Soviet had turned down nearly half of his proposed 13-member Cabinet, told the newly emboldened lawmakers that he would nominate other people for the senior posts, Tass press agency said. The rejected candidates included two present Cabinet members Ryzhkov had wanted to remain on the job, Culture Minister Vasily Zakharov and Marat Gramov, chairman of the State Committee for Physical Culture and Sports.
OPINION
November 23, 2008
Re "The myth of 'Rivals,' " Opinion, Nov. 18 Thank you for publishing Matthew Pinsker's wise caution on comparing the president-elect's Cabinet choices with Abraham Lincoln's "Team of Rivals." Comparing Lincoln's perplexing friendship with antislavery Congressman Owen Lovejoy to Barack Obama's baffling alliance with Hillary Rodham Clinton could provide more hopeful possibilities. In both situations, the president recognized the political strength of the other's more liberal constituency, the effectiveness of their skills and the extent of their personal contacts, while being well aware of a few basic differences in style and policy.
WORLD
January 17, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez
The Afghan parliament Saturday once again rejected the majority of President Hamid Karzai's choices for his Cabinet, a rebuke likely to unnerve an international community that desperately wants the Afghan leader to forge ahead with reform plans. The rejection of 10 of the 17 nominees means that Karzai will have to go back to parliament a third time to gain approval for his Cabinet choices, and raises questions about his political strength. After he presented his initial slate of 24 nominees Jan. 2, lawmakers rejected 17 of them.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2008 | Peter Nicholas and Jim Tankersley
The Cabinet that President-elect Barack Obama completed on Friday is a largely centrist and pragmatic collection of politicians and technocrats without a pronounced ideological bent. Liberals are satisfied but not delighted. Conservatives say the nominees aren't as leftist as they'd feared. Powerful interest groups with conflicting agendas are appeased. But compared with what comes next, assembling the 15-member team was the easy part.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2009 | Janet Hook
The Senate, acting within hours of President Obama's inauguration, confirmed six of his Cabinet secretaries and his budget director Tuesday, but postponed for one day a vote on the nomination of Hillary Rodham Clinton as secretary of State. Sen.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2009 | Janet Hook
The Senate, acting within hours of President Obama's inauguration, confirmed six of his Cabinet secretaries and his budget director Tuesday, but postponed for one day a vote on the nomination of Hillary Rodham Clinton as secretary of State. Sen.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2008 | Peter Nicholas and Jim Tankersley
The Cabinet that President-elect Barack Obama completed on Friday is a largely centrist and pragmatic collection of politicians and technocrats without a pronounced ideological bent. Liberals are satisfied but not delighted. Conservatives say the nominees aren't as leftist as they'd feared. Powerful interest groups with conflicting agendas are appeased. But compared with what comes next, assembling the 15-member team was the easy part.
OPINION
November 23, 2008
Re "The myth of 'Rivals,' " Opinion, Nov. 18 Thank you for publishing Matthew Pinsker's wise caution on comparing the president-elect's Cabinet choices with Abraham Lincoln's "Team of Rivals." Comparing Lincoln's perplexing friendship with antislavery Congressman Owen Lovejoy to Barack Obama's baffling alliance with Hillary Rodham Clinton could provide more hopeful possibilities. In both situations, the president recognized the political strength of the other's more liberal constituency, the effectiveness of their skills and the extent of their personal contacts, while being well aware of a few basic differences in style and policy.
WORLD
February 28, 2008 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
In his inaugural address this week, President Lee Myung-bak used the story of his own escape from poverty to urge fellow South Koreans to "work hard to realize their dreams." He recalled how, as "a boy from the countryside who could not even eat regular meals," he rose to become a successful businessman and eventually won the top job in the land. But in recent years there has been a quicker way to get rich in South Korea: real estate speculation.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new economic team appointed Thursday by incoming Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi sends a strong message through its inclusion of outsiders that reform will be more than a campaign pledge. Somewhat less heartening, however, is the lack of hard-nosed experience needed to bring about Koizumi's rather vaguely outlined reforms and tackle Japan's deep-seated problems, economists and market watchers say.
OPINION
December 31, 2000
Those who followed President-elect George W. Bush's campaign will spot few surprises in his Cabinet selections. He promised diversity, and he has included among his choices so far two women, two African Americans and a Latino. He took a generally center-right stance on most issues, and with one or two exceptions the department heads he has nominated appear to fall within the broad center-right spectrum.
WORLD
August 15, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Patrick J. McDonnell
TEHRAN - Iran's parliament handed a victory Thursday to new President Hassan Rouhani, approving 15 of his 18 proposed Cabinet ministers, including nominees to head the key ministries of oil and foreign affairs. The vote culminated four days of often rancorous discussions that were nationally televised. The debates represented a rare public airing of problems besetting the Islamic Republic, including corruption, economic malaise and environmental woes. Iranian officials lauded the proceedings as an example of transparent democracy at work in a region where political tumult and violence have dominated recent headlines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1996 | TOM PLATE, Times columnist Tom Plate also teaches in UCLA's policy studies and communication studies programs. E-mail: tplate@ucla.edu
Why, at first, am I reluctant to whine about the president's choices for the top State and Defense jobs? For one thing, the former is a woman who is poised to become the first female Secretary of State; one fears the searing brand of "sexist." And the latter is a Republican, so readers might stereotype your happily nonpartisan, nonsexist columnist as a Democrat.
NEWS
January 22, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Continuing a gradual retreat from President Clinton's expansive campaign pledges, Laura D'Andrea Tyson, Clinton's choice to head the White House Council of Economic Advisers, said Thursday that the new Administration is unlikely to be able to create the 8 million jobs Clinton promised last fall. Tyson told the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee that the jobs pledge was merely "a goal" and indicated that it almost certainly cannot be met.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|