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Cabinet Secretary

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NEWS
February 19, 1987 | Associated Press
President Reagan will appoint Nancy J. Risque, a former White House official who now works for a Washington political consulting firm, as Cabinet secretary, White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater announced Wednesday. Fitzwater said Risque will be the first woman to hold the position, which carries the rank of assistant to the President.
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NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- President Obama phoned Commerce Secretary John Bryson Tuesday morning and encouraged him to "focus his thoughts on his own health, on his own family," a White House spokesman said. The brief conversation was the first between Obama and his cabinet secretary after Bryson was allegedly involved in a series of auto accidents Saturday that apparently resulted from a seizure. Police found Bryson unconscious at the wheel of his Lexus after allegedly hitting two vehicles in the San Gabriel Valley, authorities said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2008 | Michael Rothfeld
Dan Dunmoyer, a former insurance industry lobbyist who has been a top advisor to Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger for nearly three years, has resigned as cabinet secretary, the administration announced Wednesday. He will be replaced by Victoria Bradshaw, now secretary of the state's Labor and Workforce Development Agency. She was cabinet secretary for the state's last Republican governor, Pete Wilson. The cabinet secretary is the liaison between the governor's office and the heads of other state agencies and is typically influential in the governor's decision-making.
NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Katherine Skiba
Ray LaHood, who heads the U.S. Department of Transportation, said today he is staying in that job for one term only and will not run for public office again. LaHood, 65, is a Republican from Peoria, Ill., who served in Congress for 14 years ending in January 2009, when he became a Cabinet secretary for President Obama. He was not a candidate for reelection to Congress in 2008. LaHood, whose name is sometimes mentioned for posts such as Illinois governor, said: "I'm not running for public office anymore," and specifically ruled out a run for governor.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush has selected Edith E. Holiday, the Treasury Department's top lawyer, as his Cabinet secretary, the White House announced. Holiday, who succeeds David Bates, is the Treasury's general counsel and formerly its assistant secretary for public affairs. The secretary is a liaison between the Cabinet and the White House.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Winfred Wyatt "Win" Adams, 88, who served as Cabinet secretary in the early months of former Gov. Ronald Reagan's first term and, later, as chairman of the State Water Resources Control Board, died Saturday at an assisted living center in Woodland, Calif., near Sacramento, following a brief illness. Born in 1917 in Warren, Ark., Adams served more than 20 years in the military, including 21 months in the European theater during World War II.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov.-elect Pete Wilson on Friday named a Cabinet secretary to coordinate children's services and education policy but cautioned that Maureen DiMarco should not be expected to save crucial state programs from budget cuts. "She is not a miracle worker," Wilson said of DiMarco, a Democrat and trustee of the Garden Grove Unified School District in Orange County. "We are in an economic downturn. The decisions that are made are obviously beyond her control and beyond mine."
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu chose a woman Friday to replace a Cabinet minister who resigned in the second sex scandal of a disastrous year for the governing party. The appointment of Mayumi Moriyama, 61, as chief Cabinet secretary was seen as an attempt to limit the damage caused by Friday's resignation of Tokuo Yamashita from a government formed just 16 days earlier to cleanse the scandal-ridden image of the Liberal Democratic Party.
NEWS
December 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Bush has formalized the line of succession at several key federal agencies in case a Cabinet secretary is killed or incapacitated, a housekeeping task with fresh meaning after Sept. 11. With no fanfare, Bush signed a series of executive orders in the last week that mandate a lengthy list of officials and the order in which they would take control of their Cabinet agencies. The orders don't affect the succession for the presidency, officials said.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- President Obama phoned Commerce Secretary John Bryson Tuesday morning and encouraged him to "focus his thoughts on his own health, on his own family," a White House spokesman said. The brief conversation was the first between Obama and his cabinet secretary after Bryson was allegedly involved in a series of auto accidents Saturday that apparently resulted from a seizure. Police found Bryson unconscious at the wheel of his Lexus after allegedly hitting two vehicles in the San Gabriel Valley, authorities said.
OPINION
June 21, 2011
John Bryson's nomination to be President Obama's next secretary of Commerce has been met with the predictable combination of delusion and obstructionism that characterizes the modern confirmation process. Some Senate Republicans vow to hold him hostage to the passage of several long-sought free-trade agreements; others insist they will reject him based on his presumed politics, which they wish were more like theirs. None has advanced an argument worthy of defeating this nomination, and though sensible people will withhold a final judgment until after Bryson is questioned, his credentials are encouraging, as are the endorsements of those who know him. Bryson is a familiar figure in Los Angeles.
WORLD
April 3, 2011 | By Julie Makinen and Kenji Hall, Los Angeles Times
Japan's Red Cross has collected more than $1 billion in the first three weeks after the massive earthquake and tsunami but has yet to distribute any funds directly to victims, prompting Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano to urge Sunday that the process be accelerated. Meanwhile, the operator of the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant reported no significant progress in stopping the leak of radioactive water into the sea. Tokyo Electric Power Co. officials think the leak has been coming from a concrete pit holding power cables near reactor No. 2, and attempted Sunday to seal a crack there with a special polymer.
WORLD
March 18, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Japan's top government spokesman said Friday that the country's leadership was overwhelmed by last week's earthquake and tsunami, which slowed its ability to respond to the following humanitarian crisis and nuclear emergency. "The unprecedented scale of the earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan, frankly speaking, were among many things that happened that had not been anticipated under our disaster management contingency plans," Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said, according to the Associated Press.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2011 | By Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
Gov. Jerry Brown said Friday that he would slash $6.4 million from his own office budget, abolishing the first lady's office, paring staff in Sacramento and Washington, D.C., and shuttering field operations around the state. He also eliminated the position of secretary of education, which he has singled out as an example of bureaucratic redundancy because the state already has a superintendent of schools and a board of education. The moves came as Brown prepared to unveil a state budget Monday that is expected to propose cutting billions of dollars in government services.
OPINION
September 13, 2010 | By James Grant
On the afternoon of May 7, assembling in the opulent St. Stephen's Club in London, Britain's political journalists — weary from the election night before and excited about the fact that no party claimed a majority of seats in Parliament — raised their eager faces as Conservative Party leader David Cameron entered and took his place at the lectern. To form a government, Cameron would need to ally himself with some of his opponents after a bitter campaign. Many doubted his ability to do so. "I want to make a big, open and comprehensive offer to the Liberal Democrats," Cameron said, referring to the party that finished third in the balloting.
WORLD
December 10, 2009 | By Jim Tankersley
A double-decker white tour boat sailed Wednesday afternoon toward a crescent of giant steel propellers towering above the seawater and spinning in a stiff winter wind. The boat's guest of honor, U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar, rose to laud his hosts and to assure them that his country was taking steps to "get our act together" on offshore wind power. "We see Denmark as a leader and an example in wind, especially offshore," Salazar told a cabin filled mostly with European journalists and wind-energy officials.
NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Katherine Skiba
Ray LaHood, who heads the U.S. Department of Transportation, said today he is staying in that job for one term only and will not run for public office again. LaHood, 65, is a Republican from Peoria, Ill., who served in Congress for 14 years ending in January 2009, when he became a Cabinet secretary for President Obama. He was not a candidate for reelection to Congress in 2008. LaHood, whose name is sometimes mentioned for posts such as Illinois governor, said: "I'm not running for public office anymore," and specifically ruled out a run for governor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2011 | By Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
Gov. Jerry Brown said Friday that he would slash $6.4 million from his own office budget, abolishing the first lady's office, paring staff in Sacramento and Washington, D.C., and shuttering field operations around the state. He also eliminated the position of secretary of education, which he has singled out as an example of bureaucratic redundancy because the state already has a superintendent of schools and a board of education. The moves came as Brown prepared to unveil a state budget Monday that is expected to propose cutting billions of dollars in government services.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2009 | Peter Nicholas
The White House bills it as a "listening tour," a chance for President Obama's Cabinet to get out of Washington and hear what's on the minds of rural voters around the country. En route, the White House is making sure it reaches voters in crucial swing districts.
NATIONAL
April 19, 2009 | Noam N. Levey
President Obama, whose healthcare and economic stimulus initiatives threaten to dramatically inflate the federal budget deficit, heralded a new push Saturday to cut wasteful spending in Washington. The president said that in coming weeks he would announce the elimination of "dozens of government programs." And he said he would ask his Cabinet secretaries on Monday for specific proposals to slash their departments' budgets, promising there would be "no sacred cows and no pet projects."
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