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Cable Television Industry

NEWS
November 21, 2001 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Tuesday, HBO finally came to skid row. As did the History Channel, Bravo, CNN and a host of other cable stations that most Los Angeles residents take for granted. People huddled in the lobbies of single-room-occupancy hotels in the impoverished downtown neighborhood, debating the merits of basic versus premium service. They waited anxiously for cable technicians who, true to form, turned up in the last half hour of 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. appointments.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1998
Here is the complete list of nominations for the 50th annual nighttime Emmy Awards, as announced Thursday by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. They cover programs aired between June 1, 1997, and May 31, 1998. PROGRAMS * Comedy series: "Ally McBeal," Fox; "Frasier," NBC; "The Larry Sanders Show," HBO; "Seinfeld," NBC; "3rd Rock From the Sun," NBC. * Drama series: "ER," NBC; "Law & Order," NBC; "NYPD Blue," ABC; "The Practice," ABC; "The X-Files," Fox.
NEWS
November 4, 2000 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sex sells. But that doesn't excite the city's largest cable operator, Adelphia Communications, whose conservative rural Pennsylvania owners are taking the moral high ground and dropping sex channels from its systems here. The move is contrary to an industrywide trend by satellite and cable operators to bolster their bottom lines offering highly profitable pay-per-view adult fare.
MAGAZINE
May 16, 1993 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Staff writer Carla Lazzareschi covers business for The Times. Her last piece for the magazine was on IBM.
CABLE TELEVISION, THE CREEPING GIANT of American communications, probably got its start in the 1940s in the mountainous backwoods of northeastern Pennsylvania. Legend says a local merchant, desperate to sell more television sets in terrain that blocked the signal, came up with the idea of planting a large antenna on New Boston Mountain and connecting it through a web of underground wires to nearby homes.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2002 | Jon Healey
Panasonic Technologies has struck a deal with the cable industry that will enable the company to build cable-ready digital TV sets, starting as early as next year. The agreement, which gives Panasonic a license to the industry's security technology, is the first to be signed by a television manufacturer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1994 | JEANNETTE REGALADO
A local cable television company is requiring customers found with illegal cable boxes to pay $2,500 or face a civil lawsuit. But customers of Chatsworth-based Cablevision Industries claim the company used improper tactics when it confiscated their electronic boxes. "Our sweeps have been very successful," Robert Thoreson, the company's security manager, who has organized the crackdown on customers who can use the boxes to unscramble premium cable channels without paying for them.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2001 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few rivals in U.S. business could be more dissimilar in performance, philosophy or corporate culture than AT&T Corp. and Comcast Corp., the two companies that are battling over AT&T's cable properties and their 13.5 million subscribers. The conflict features as broad a spectrum of personalities as corporate America has to offer, from deal-making gunslingers to bean counters, from self-made billionaires to Boston Brahmins.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1996 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If life gives you lemons, the saying goes, make lemonade. And if you have limited resources and a library full of old movies and TV series, dress them up into something that looks fresh and hip. That's the approach used by several cable networks, which have managed to turn properties that once languished on studios' shelves into attention- and ratings-grabbing programming blocks by repackaging them through elaborate promotions, theme nights, hosts and contests.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1994 | By JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A promising new video technology, which federal regulators backed a year ago to encourage a lower-cost alternative to cable TV, may be stalled because of a battle with the satellite industry over scarce airwave space. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration says communications satellites will need the same part of the radio airwaves that was planned for use by the video service.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blame it on Radio City Music Hall. Back in 1971, Walt Disney Pictures had booked its lavish family musical "Bedknobs and Broomsticks" into New York's famous movie palace. But Radio City issued a decree: The film had to be under two hours because it was to be packaged with the theater's elaborate stage show. So more than 20 minutes were excised from the big-budget fantasy to give it a running time of 117 minutes.
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