Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCable
IN THE NEWS

Cable

NEWS
May 14, 1989 | PAUL D. COLFORD, Newsday
Remember the one about the guy who tried to sell the Brooklyn Bridge? This time, the guy is for real. The guy is Lou Pabon--construction worker, bouncer, entrepreneur. Tarnished cable that once stretched like so many gossamer strands of the Brooklyn Bridge now lies in a heap about a mile away from the bridge. It is Pabon's plan to untwirl this giant mound of steel spaghetti and cut it into 3-inch paperweights ($30-$40) and larger brass-, silver- and gold-plated wall plaques ($150 and up)
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - On a recent morning, Joel Stillerman, an executive with the cable network AMC, was sitting in his 15th-floor office opposite Madison Square Garden and getting excited. He wasn't enthused about the usual matters, like the restored popularity of the network's signature series, "Mad Men," or the shiny ratings for the recently concluded season of the zombie hit"The Walking Dead. " "You've never seen 'Ace in the Hole?'" Stillerman said to a reporter, referring to the 1951 Billy Wilder film about a cynical newsman.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
The first fiber-optic cable across the Pacific Ocean went into service today, tying the United States and Japan together more tightly than ever before. The cable, no bigger than a garden hose, stretches 8,271 miles from California, through Hawaii, splitting in the western Pacific into legs that travel to Guam and Japan. Pacific Link vastly increases the capacity for communication across the Pacific, which is sometimes called the ocean of America's future. Instead of driving a golden spike, the builders of the $700-million cable marked its completion with a video teleconference between Japan and the board room of the New York Stock Exchange.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
The online video site Hulu once had ambitions of ushering in the future of television by shaking up the status quo. But under its new management, the site will throw off its old mantle of TV disrupter as it seeks to work in partnership with cable and satellite companies. Veteran Fox television executive Mike Hopkins took over as chief executive less than a month ago, an appointment that signaled the media companies that control Hulu wanted to turn the popular service into a feature offered through pay-TV distributors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2009 | Associated Press
Authorities closed both directions of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge after a cable snapped on the upper deck of the span Tuesday. California Highway Patrol Officer Peter Van Eckhardt said the bridge would be closed for at least 24 hours so crews can try to repair the cable, which snapped during the evening commute. Van Eckhardt said the closure comes after a cable and a large piece of metal fell onto a westbound portion of the roadway about 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. Before the closure, traffic was already backed up into Oakland.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2008 | SCOTT COLLINS
ThiNGs weren't supposed to work this way. Last week's Democratic convention in Denver came off as a tightly scripted affair; all the drama resided in how the thing was covered on TV. It was the ultimate meta-event! Take, for example, the Matthews Meltdown. Discussing Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's speech on Tuesday, MSNBC host Chris Matthews lost it after colleague Keith Olbermann seemed to mock him with a hand gesture that suggested Matthews was talking too much. Hair askew, looking as if he had spent the night on a bench in a bus station, Matthews shed TV's normal protocol and retorted: "I can do the same to you!"
BUSINESS
December 8, 2009 | By Matea Gold
When Comcast Corp. assumes control of NBC Universal, the company will inherit a portfolio of news organizations, including a top-shelf network news division that dominates the competition. Powered by the "Today" show in the morning and "NBC Nightly News" in the evening, NBC News is one of the few bright spots at the broadcast network. It's also one of the few aspects of the venture that will be largely new terrain for Comcast. Until now, the Philadelphia-based cable television operator's experience in news has been limited to running a handful of local television channels that produce newscasts, including the East Coast regional network CN8 until it shut down at the end of last year.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|