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November 11, 1989 | Associated Press
A woman was buried Friday in the back of her beloved red 1976 Cadillac convertible--in 14 plots at Riverview Cemetery, funeral home officials said. Aurora Schuck, a native of Cuba, died Tuesday of cancer at age 62. "The casket is going to be placed on the back of the car. The top's down, so it will just be placed on that, across the back," a funeral home spokesman said. A construction company dug a grave large enough for the car.
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BUSINESS
November 6, 2009 | DAN NEIL
When Italian car-making giant Fiat announced it would be taking over bankrupted, bailed-out Chrysler, I was skeptical. Indeed, I thought the whole plan had ingested powerful hallucinogens. Yet I continue to hope that somehow, one day, I might be able to go down to my local Fiat/Chrysler dealer and purchase an Alfa Romeo 159 Sportwagon. This is a gorgeous Roman lyre of a car, a sleek transporter that -- when painted gloss black and kitted with 19-inch turbine alloy wheels -- will stop traffic like an overturned big rig. Until that day, the Cadillac CTS Sport Wagon will have to do. I know, "sport sedan" and "station wagon": The terms might seem as notionally dissonant as "Rhodes Scholar" and "Wasilla, Alaska."
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BUSINESS
May 6, 1999 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unprecedented move, Cadillac has apologized to archrival Lincoln for fudging December sales numbers to maintain its coveted crown as the best-selling luxury brand for 1998. Historic segment leader Cadillac, skillfully zigging its way around the "L" word, said Wednesday that an internal audit showed that it "overstated" December sales by 4,773 vehicles. Initially, Cadillac had claimed the sales title by a scant 222 vehicles.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2008 | DAN NEIL
With 556 horsepower under its tented hood and a cross-wire grille that looks inspired by the maximum-security wing at Chino, the 2009 Cadillac CTS-V seems, well, sort of aggressive. Remember when Cadillacs were soft and pillowy and ambled around town in a kind of Vicodin haze? Remember when you felt like you needed to slip into supportive undergarments to drive one? Doesn't that seem a long time ago?
BUSINESS
September 14, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
In the retro-traditionalist 1980s, it was bound to happen. Tail fins are making a comeback of sorts. To be sure, they aren't the hideously sharp fins of the early 1960s. But modest, squared-off fins seem to be sprouting on the back ends of 1989 Cadillacs just the same. "I would say they certainly are not big fins in the way Cadillac had in the 1950s and 1960s, but they are leading in that direction," observes Chris Cedergren, a Cadillac historian as well as a market analyst with J. D.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Add a few extra inches here, a little more sheet metal there, throw in a hint of fender skirts and tail fins--and what happens? Cadillac makes a comeback. Last fall, Cadillac, desperate to recapture its traditional buyers who had fled to Lincoln and the imports after Cadillac had downsized its cars in the mid-1980s, introduced a new line of bigger, longer and, many would argue--gaudier--cars.
AUTOS
May 10, 2006 | Chris Erskine, Times Staff Writer
LATELY, while pondering a new set of wheels, I'm wrestling with a notion shared by many car shoppers today: Do we buy one last great ride regardless of the gas costs and mileage, sensing that the end of an era is at hand? Or do we give in to the good angel on the shoulder, who whispers that it's not just about us anymore. Decisions like this are now about bigger things: geopolitics, global warming, living within our means.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
403,000 Cadillacs Recalled: General Motors Corp. is recalling Cadillac De Villes manufactured between 1991 and 1993 to replace a defective rubber oil hose that could create a fire risk. The company said the hose could separate from a connector and spill oil in the engine compartment. GM said it had reports of 27 fires related to the defect but no injuries. It said recall notices would be sent to owners over the next six to eight weeks.
BUSINESS
September 2, 1997 | From Associated Press
General Motors Corp. said Monday that it will introduce U.S.-made Cadillacs to Britain for the first time next week, trying to capture a bigger share of the country's luxury automobile market. GM's British subsidiary, Vauxhall, hopes that the Cadillac Seville SLS and STS cars will take business away from Jaguar, the British car maker owned by U.S. rival Ford Motor Co., as well as Mercedes and BMW of Germany and the Lexus luxury cars made by Japan's Toyota.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2008 | Ken Bensinger, Times Staff Writer
Cadillac unveiled a concept car this week that runs partially on hydrogen, adding to the ranks of futuristic vehicles powered by the universe's most common element. Yet even if you could drive it -- there's only one now -- you couldn't get from L.A. to San Francisco, because there aren't enough fueling stations. The state, through its Hydrogen Highway program, has been pushing to create a network of 100 hydrogen fueling stations by 2010.
AUTOS
May 10, 2006 | Chris Erskine, Times Staff Writer
LATELY, while pondering a new set of wheels, I'm wrestling with a notion shared by many car shoppers today: Do we buy one last great ride regardless of the gas costs and mileage, sensing that the end of an era is at hand? Or do we give in to the good angel on the shoulder, who whispers that it's not just about us anymore. Decisions like this are now about bigger things: geopolitics, global warming, living within our means.
AUTOS
September 7, 2005 | Warren Brown, The Washington Post
Kicking out the old folks is a full-time occupation for many of today's marketers. It is an unkind acknowledgment that old people usually die before the young. Dead people don't spend money. Most marketers, of course, are too slick to be that blunt. They'd rather sell "youth" than emphasize demise. Take car advertisements: They give the impression that no one over 45 drives. Middle-aged people and senior citizens don't exist in those pitches. They've joined the ranks of the disappeared.
AUTOS
December 29, 2004 | Steven Cole Smith, Orlando Sentinel
For those luxury SUV customers who hate to make decisions, allow me to present the 2005 Cadillac Escalade ESV Platinum Edition. The only choice you'll have to make is one of four colors; everything else is included. And I mean everything. As if the regular Cadillac Escalade isn't big enough, the ESV adds 22 inches to the length.
AUTOS
December 15, 2004 | Warren Brown, Washington Post
Whether he was falling into or out of love, the late Ray Charles had a penchant for falling into Detroit's cars when he sang the blues. Charles favored Cadillac, the standard of motorized excellence in the 1950s when he began establishing his reputation as one of the world's greatest performers of blues and country music. To get his woman, he needed that car -- the symbol of wealth, the high-powered version of manhood.
AUTOS
April 7, 2004 | DAN NEIL
ONLY about 15% of Americans know how to drive a manual transmission. This is not surprising. Most Americans couldn't find France on a map and couldn't name the chief justice of the United States if William H. Rehnquist bit them on the face.
AUTOS
March 10, 2004 | DAN NEIL
As Cadillac heads down the road, what kind of music is on the stereo? The GM luxury division's "Break Through" television ad campaign defibrillates viewers' hearts with Led Zeppelin's 1971 classic "Rock and Roll." Let us not kid ourselves. This ad campaign is aimed primarily at white boomers, affluent suburbanites as young as 44 and as old as, say, Robert Plant and Jimmy Page, rock gods who are spending entirely too much time in the bathroom.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
General Motors Corp.'s Cadillac luxury brand Wednesday topped a J.D. Power & Associates survey of customer satisfaction with their dealers, while its Saturn brand slumped from first to fifth. The world's largest automaker led the survey for the fourth straight year. Porsche moved up to second from eighth in the annual study by the Westlake Village-based research company. Cadillac was second in 2002. Ford Motor Co.'s Lincoln remained third and its Mercury brand rose to fourth from ninth.
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