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Cadmium

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BUSINESS
October 7, 2010 | By Ellen Gabler
When McDonald's recalled 12 million " Shrek" beverage glasses in June because the designs contained cadmium, consumers were told the glasses weren't toxic but were being recalled out of an abundance of caution. Regulators wouldn't disclose the amount of cadmium in the glasses. But recently released regulatory records show that the recall was spurred after government scientists concluded a 6-year-old could be exposed to hazardous levels of the carcinogen after touching one of the glasses eight times in a day. Oak Brook, Ill.-based McDonald's and the company that manufactured the glasses, ARC International of Millville, N.J., insist the products are safe.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO — Workers at the Navy's top maintenance facility for F/A-18 warplanes have been exposed to "extremely toxic materials" such as lead, cadmium and beryllium, according to surprise inspections by the Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration. OSHA has given the Navy until Sept. 26 to fix the problems at the Fleet Readiness Center Southwest at North Island Naval Air Station on Coronado or face an order to shut down the facility. The violations were revealed Thursday.
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BUSINESS
September 10, 2010 | By Lily Kuo, Los Angeles Times
The cupcake-shaped pendants came in shades of blue and pink, studded with rhinestones. Meant for little girls, they hung on simple faux-silver necklaces and cost as little as $8. And they were potentially deadly, according to consumer advocates. This type of cheap costume jewelry made with the metal cadmium, which can be toxic at high levels, is at the heart of the latest "made in China" scare. Since January, the Consumer Product Safety Commission has targeted more than 200,000 pieces of cheap jewelry from China that were made with cadmium and sold at numerous national retail chains, including Wal-Mart and Claire's.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2012 | By William D'Urso, Los Angeles Time
State officials have filed a lawsuit against 16 downtown Los Angeles jewelry stores and distributors, accusing them of selling items with toxic levels of lead. Capping a three-year investigation, the state Department of Toxic Substances Control said at a news conference Tuesday that it had seized 306 pieces of jewelry that were found to be tainted with high levels of lead and cadmium. The jewelry seized was mainly inexpensive adult and children's jewelry, said Brian Johnson, the department's deputy director of enforcement.
NEWS
March 4, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
Cadmium likely isn't the first thing on your mind when you buy a cheap little bracelet or necklace for your child. But maybe it should be. A new study finds that children who wear, mouth or swallow inexpensive  jewelry items could be exposed to high levels of the metal. Researchers tested charms, bracelets and necklaces, mostly imported from China, to determine the levels of cadmium in each.  "Of 92 pieces of jewelry tested under ingestion conditions, two pieces (a football pendant and a heart charm)
BUSINESS
September 7, 2011 | Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
Major retailers that sell jewelry, including Gap Inc., Forever 21 Inc. and Target Corp., have reached a settlement with a California environmental group that would all but ban the use of cadmium in those items. The legal agreement, approved by an Alameda County Superior Court judge, sets strict limits on the toxic heavy metal, which can cause cancer, genetic problems and kidney damage. By Dec. 31, children's and adult jewelry sold by the companies must contain no more than 0.03% of cadmium, according to the settlement between the Center for Environmental Health and the retail companies.
HEALTH
March 15, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
In a finding that strengthens the link between environmental pollutants and rising rates of breast cancer, new research finds that women whose diets contain higher levels of cadmium are at greater risk of developing breast cancer than those who ingest less of the industrial chemical in their food. Cadmium, a heavy metal long identified as a carcinogen, leaches into crops from fertilizers and when rainfall or sewage sludge deposit it onto farmland. Whole grains, potatoes, other vegetables and shellfish are key dietary sources of cadmium, which also becomes airborne as a pollutant when fossil fuels are burned, and is likely inhaled as well as ingested.
NATIONAL
June 4, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Tribune Washington Bureau
McDonald's will recall about 12 million "Shrek" drinking glasses because federal regulators found they contain the toxic metal cadmium, which poses health risks. The glasses have been sold for $2 apiece at McDonald's restaurants across the country as a promotional tie-in with the movie "Shrek Forever After." Purchasers will be advised to keep them away from children and to return them to McDonald's for a refund. The recall, which will be officially announced Friday by the Consumer Product Safety Commission, was set in motion by an anonymous tip to Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Hillsborough)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2000
Forty-six percent of adult white-tailed ptarmigans in the southern Rocky Mountains suffer from cadmium poisoning, Oregon State University researchers report in today's Nature. The birds eat willows, which concentrate cadmium from the environment, said biologist James R. Larison. Many other animals also eat the willow and may have similar problems, he said. Cadmium is present in soil in the region, but mining makes even more of it biologically available.
NEWS
May 28, 1990 | GEORGE HATCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When U.S. Sen. John Chafee introduced a wide-ranging solid-waste bill last fall, artists saw red. And yellow and orange. The legislation, aimed at stemming the flow of trash to the nation's landfills, includes a ban on cadmium pigments to help prevent toxic substances from seeping into ground water supplies. Alarmed, artists quickly informed Chafee (R-R.I.) that cadmium is an irreplaceable source of their brightest and most fade-resistant red, yellow and orange colors.
HEALTH
March 15, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
In a finding that strengthens the link between environmental pollutants and rising rates of breast cancer, new research finds that women whose diets contain higher levels of cadmium are at greater risk of developing breast cancer than those who ingest less of the industrial chemical in their food. Cadmium, a heavy metal long identified as a carcinogen, leaches into crops from fertilizers and when rainfall or sewage sludge deposit it onto farmland. Whole grains, potatoes, other vegetables and shellfish are key dietary sources of cadmium, which also becomes airborne as a pollutant when fossil fuels are burned, and is likely inhaled as well as ingested.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2011 | Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
Major retailers that sell jewelry, including Gap Inc., Forever 21 Inc. and Target Corp., have reached a settlement with a California environmental group that would all but ban the use of cadmium in those items. The legal agreement, approved by an Alameda County Superior Court judge, sets strict limits on the toxic heavy metal, which can cause cancer, genetic problems and kidney damage. By Dec. 31, children's and adult jewelry sold by the companies must contain no more than 0.03% of cadmium, according to the settlement between the Center for Environmental Health and the retail companies.
NEWS
March 4, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
Cadmium likely isn't the first thing on your mind when you buy a cheap little bracelet or necklace for your child. But maybe it should be. A new study finds that children who wear, mouth or swallow inexpensive  jewelry items could be exposed to high levels of the metal. Researchers tested charms, bracelets and necklaces, mostly imported from China, to determine the levels of cadmium in each.  "Of 92 pieces of jewelry tested under ingestion conditions, two pieces (a football pendant and a heart charm)
WORLD
October 29, 2010 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
The newspaper headline captured the latest cuisine controversy in this seafood-crazy country: "Can eating octopus heads be hazardous to your health?" A favorite dish for generations of Koreans, octopus heads have long been associated with good nutrition, not to mention their reputed qualities as an aphrodisiac. But a Seoul city government study last month determined that the delicacy contains dangerous levels of the heavy metal cadmium. The findings touched off what newspapers have dubbed "the octopus head war," pitting city health officials against irate fishermen protective of the $35-million industry.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2010 | By Ellen Gabler
Federal regulators said on Tuesday that they will back voluntary standards set by the private sector to determine a safe level for cadmium, a known carcinogen, in children's jewelry. Officials with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission have said for months that the agency was working on new cadmium standards to address concerns about the heavy metal in consumer products, including children's jewelry. On Tuesday, safety commission Chairwoman Inez Tenenbaum announced that the agency simply would provide new scientific research on cadmium to ASTM International in hopes that the standard-setting organization will use it to set limits for cadmium in children's jewelry and toys.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2010 | By Ellen Gabler
When McDonald's recalled 12 million " Shrek" beverage glasses in June because the designs contained cadmium, consumers were told the glasses weren't toxic but were being recalled out of an abundance of caution. Regulators wouldn't disclose the amount of cadmium in the glasses. But recently released regulatory records show that the recall was spurred after government scientists concluded a 6-year-old could be exposed to hazardous levels of the carcinogen after touching one of the glasses eight times in a day. Oak Brook, Ill.-based McDonald's and the company that manufactured the glasses, ARC International of Millville, N.J., insist the products are safe.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2012 | By William D'Urso, Los Angeles Time
State officials have filed a lawsuit against 16 downtown Los Angeles jewelry stores and distributors, accusing them of selling items with toxic levels of lead. Capping a three-year investigation, the state Department of Toxic Substances Control said at a news conference Tuesday that it had seized 306 pieces of jewelry that were found to be tainted with high levels of lead and cadmium. The jewelry seized was mainly inexpensive adult and children's jewelry, said Brian Johnson, the department's deputy director of enforcement.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2010 | Bloomberg News
McDonald's Corp. is offering $3 refunds to customers who bought "Shrek" drinking glasses, the promotional items recalled last week because they're tainted with cadmium. Starting Wednesday, customers can fill out a refund slip and return the glassware to any McDonald's restaurant, the Oak Brook, Ill.-based company said. The glasses sold for $1.99 with a food purchase and $2.49 without. The 16-ounce glasses featuring characters from "Shrek Forever After" were recalled June 4 in cooperation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2010 | By Lily Kuo, Los Angeles Times
The cupcake-shaped pendants came in shades of blue and pink, studded with rhinestones. Meant for little girls, they hung on simple faux-silver necklaces and cost as little as $8. And they were potentially deadly, according to consumer advocates. This type of cheap costume jewelry made with the metal cadmium, which can be toxic at high levels, is at the heart of the latest "made in China" scare. Since January, the Consumer Product Safety Commission has targeted more than 200,000 pieces of cheap jewelry from China that were made with cadmium and sold at numerous national retail chains, including Wal-Mart and Claire's.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2010 | David Lazarus
It's bad enough that about 12 million potentially toxic "Shrek" drinking glasses were recalled by McDonald's last week. But what should really get people's alarm bells ringing is the fact that nobody seems to know, or is willing to say publicly, how the carcinogenic metal cadmium got into paint used to depict Shrek, Donkey and other characters. Worse, federal law allows cadmium to be in a product marketed to children as long as the product isn't a toy, raising questions as to how many other goods may be out there that also pose a health risk.
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