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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1999
Re Campo de Cahuenga historical site. The Native Daughters of the Golden West Parlors in the San Fernando Valley wish to go on record as being in full support of preserving the original foundations and floors of the Don Tomas Feliz Adobe of 1845 and support alternative No. 2 with regard to the widening of Lankershim Boulevard adjacent to Campo de Cahuenga. This is the site of one of the most historic moments in California history and its integrity must be preserved. We support 4(f)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
A fatal crash on the 101 Freeway temporarily closed all southbound lanes through the Cahuenga Pass on Thursday morning after a Bell Canyon man rear-ended a big rig, authorities said. The crash occurred about 3 a.m. north of Vineland Avenue in the southbound freeway's slow lanes, said California Highway Patrol Officer Leland Tang. A 70-year-old man changed lanes and rear-ended a big rig, which wedged his 2004 Lexus underneath the truck, killing him. There were no skid marks at the scene of the crash, Tang said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1998
A slight correction to your Sept. 26 story on city squares named for various luminaries: Raymond Chandler Square in Hollywood was placed at the intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and Cahuenga not so much for the nearby hotels where Chandler sometimes lived, but because the fictional office of his fictional hero, Philip Marlowe, was in the former Security Pacific Bank building there at 6381 Hollywood Boulevard, which Chandler dubbed "The Cahuenga Building."...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2012 | August Brown
It's only a few days before the new Cahuenga-area nightclub AV is set to open, and co-owner Tosh Berman is still futzing with the decor. "This silver pattern on the walls isn't working. I'm gonna replace it," he said, surveying his new domain while dressed in an all-black get-up and military haircut that made him look like a successful model/ninja. He picked up a chestnut-colored leather couch cushion embossed in a dandyish paisley pattern. "These are detachable, I wanted them to be able to come off at night.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2008
The idea behind Kitchen 24 -- an all-night diner and bar lodged in the maw of the beast that is the Cahuenga Corridor -- is so blindingly obvious it's amazing the place hasn't existed until a few weeks ago. Put scads of painted trollops and Drakkar-smelling dudes in the middle of the two-block strip that houses Hollywood's most vacuous nightclubs, and it's inevitable that they'll want to take a break from dog-earing copies of "The Game" to gobble sweet...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1997
Re "The Rest Is History," Jan. 13. I would like to make a comment about the so-called Treaty of Cahuenga. Simply put, there was no such thing. The only thing that happened at Cahuenga on Jan. 13, 1847, was that the (Mexican) Army of California agreed to capitulate to a particular army of the United States. (John C. Fremont was technically a naval officer and got himself court-martialed for signing the "treaty" and other indiscretions). The Californios didn't much care for rule by Mexico City, and most Californios were glad to have the U.S. takeover, honor having been served with scattered fighting having taken place across much of the province.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1993 | HEIDI SIEGMUND
Club Junkie, the Tuesday night metamorphosis of Hollywood's Maxx club, looks every inch the backdrop to a Nine Inch Nails video--a banned Nine Inch Nails video. The atmosphere is mini-"Lollapalooza," complete with impromptu body-piercing on the patio, and tattoo sessions and S&M revues in the main room. This week's scene included some teasing bullwhip spanking at 10 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1989 | Todd David Schwartz \f7
World Book & News Co., the 24-hour newsstand at 1652 N. Cahuenga Blvd. in Hollywood, a local landmark for over 50 years, has helped to inspire a new musical, "Hard Copy." Sam Harris of "Star Search" fame will star; he also wrote the book, lyrics and much of the music. The production, populated by a varied assortment of characters who meander into an all-night newsstand, previews May 4 and opens May 12 at the Coast Playhouse. Harris told us he gathered impressions from numerous newstands, but added, "I (particularly)
TRAVEL
April 24, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The San Fernando Valley is 260 square miles of suburbia. Actually, make that suburbia on nutritional supplements. And antidepressants. With perhaps a little cosmetic surgery south of Ventura Boulevard, where the big money is. Or maybe - now that it's grown to more than 1.7 million people in nearly three dozen cities and neighborhoods rich and poor - the Valley isn't even a suburb anymore. It begins just 10 miles northwest of Los Angeles City Hall, sprawling west to the Simi Hills, north to the Santa Susana Mountains, and east to the Verdugo and San Gabriel mountains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1997
Re "Historical Facts," Jan. 26. The capitulation at Cahuenga and the Treaty of Cahuenga are the same event; some favor the one or the other. Under the terms, each Mexican was to conform to U.S. law and accept the conditions of the capitulation by supporting the peace and tranquillity of the agreement, and all prisoners would be released. Those who did not wish to stay could leave for Mexico. Lt. Col. John C. Fremont has some major historical detractors who dispute his outstanding record as an explorer, surveyor and soldier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2012 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
It's a howling shame. An Ohio woman who had hoped to get her dog on "The Ellen DeGeneres Show" has been ordered to remove a Cahuenga Pass billboard that pictures her pooch in a blond wig with the message, "Ellen, Denali the Dog Wants to Meet You. " Madalyn Ruggiero, a freelance photographer who dresses her golden retriever in funny costumes and sells the images as greeting cards, had rented the billboard for six weeks. But instead of getting a phone call to appear on DeGeneres' show, Ruggiero got word from the billboard company that her ad had to come down after only five days.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2011 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
Long-standing plans to build a $45-million hotel in Hollywood have been revived, the developers said, with new financing and a new operator. The nine-story hotel at Selma Avenue and Cahuenga Boulevard, formerly to be known as the Selma, was approved by city officials in 2008, but funding for real estate development grew hard to come by as lenders tightened their purse strings in the economic downturn. "We fought hard to find conventional financing," developer Richard Heyman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Every night that there's a concert at the Hollywood Bowl, its operator, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, sends beams of light into the sky above. The purpose isn't to create a lot of showbiz hoopla, says Deborah Borda, the Philharmonic's president and chief executive. It's to tell pilots of helicopters and small aircraft to stay the heck away. But increasingly, Borda says, attempts to communicate both in light and in words have fallen on deafening ears. Not a summer concert night goes by now, she says, without the purity of music falling prey to choppers dealing noise pollution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2011 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
He came to their rescue when they were between a rock and a hard place. So it's fitting that Hugh Hefner will be honored with a boulder for helping the Trust for Public Land acquire Cahuenga Peak, the mountaintop next to the Hollywood sign. Leaders of the trust said Tuesday they plan to place plaques on large boulders to thank the Playboy magazine founder and two others who stepped up at the last moment to donate $1 million each to acquire the peak from its Chicago-based owners.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2010 | By Charlie Amter, Special to the Los Angeles Times
This summer, two of Los Angeles' best-known nightlife players go head-to-head, opening new clubs just blocks apart in a big push for their share of the increasingly competitive Hollywood market. Last month, SBE's Sam Nazarian and Syndicate Hospitality's David Judaken each rolled out separate high-profile venues aimed at a similar upwardly mobile audience: Nazarian debuted his company's Hamptons-inspired club the Colony on Cahuenga Boulevard, while Judaken unveiled his latest streamlined space, MyStudio, on Hollywood Boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2010 | By Ching-Ching Ni, Los Angeles Times
When Playboy founder Hugh Hefner heard that the campaign to buy the open space west of the Hollywood sign was short about $1 million, he knew he had to step in once again to protect the famous Los Angeles landmark. "Turned out the kid was back in the water again," he said in a telephone interview. So he anted up $900,000, which helped the campaign cross the finish line. On Monday, the Trust for Public Land announced that, thanks to Hefner's gift and an additional $500,000 from the Tiffany & Co. Foundation and Aileen Getty, it finally had the $12.5 million needed to buy Cahuenga Peak from Fox River Financial Resources Inc. The 138-acre property, which offers a spectacular 360-degree panorama of the Los Angeles Basin and the San Fernando Valley, now will become part of Griffith Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2010 | By Kim Christensen
With just four days left to raise enough money to preserve a 138-acre patch of land next to the Hollywood sign, Serena Irani was happy do her part. "I'm going to sell these to save the peak," the 10-year-old said Saturday, showing off a tray of cupcakes she had helped her mom bake the night before. If only she could have charged $200,000 apiece for them. Facing a $2.8-million gap in the $12.5 million needed to buy Cahuenga Peak from a group of Chicago investors, neighborhood associations and the Trust for Public Land rallied for the final push with live music and a bake sale at Lake Hollywood Park, beneath the landmark sign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2010 | By Bob Pool
Nobody seemed to want the mountaintop in the old days. Legend has it that mining mogul-turned-ostrich farmer Griffith J. Griffith was scared into giving a huge chunk of the rugged ridge to the city of Los Angeles in 1896 after encountering the ghost of the former landowner on the property. When aircraft titan Howard Hughes acquired the western end of the mountain in the 1930s and tried to build a love nest for actress Ginger Rogers high upon it, she refused to go along with the idea.
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