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BUSINESS
March 15, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians has obtained $140 million in bank financing to build a $95-million casino in Palm Springs and repay construction loans for the Rancho Mirage gambling hall it opened in 2001, attorneys for the tribe said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2012
Richard Milanovich, who spent nearly three decades as chairman of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, will be honored Wednesday at the Palm Springs Convention Center, 277 N. Avenida Caballeros. A remembrance ceremony will begin at 10 a.m. and will be followed by a celebration of his life at noon. His body will lie in repose at the Convention Center, which will be open to the public from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday and from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday.
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BUSINESS
July 22, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Caesars to Invest in Indian Casino: Caesars World Inc. said it signed an agreement to help the Agua Caliente band of Cahuilla Indians build and operate a $25-million casino in Palm Springs. Under the agreement, Caesars will finance construction of the 80,000-square-foot facility and manage it. About 50% of the space will be devoted to non-gaming activities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
Richard Milanovich, who as chairman of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians helped to usher in a new age of wealth and political muscle for many Native Americans through the expansion of tribal casinos in California, died Sunday at Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage. He was 69 and had cancer. During Milanovich's nearly three decades as chairman, the Agua Caliente tribe rose from a harsh desert existence to the glitz and riches that accompany casino-fed wealth. The transformation coincided with the rebirth of Palm Springs, home to one of the tribe's two posh casino resorts and large swaths of tribal land, and economic gains across the checkerboard reservations in the Coachella Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
Richard Milanovich, who as chairman of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians helped to usher in a new age of wealth and political muscle for many Native Americans through the expansion of tribal casinos in California, died Sunday at Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage. He was 69 and had cancer. During Milanovich's nearly three decades as chairman, the Agua Caliente tribe rose from a harsh desert existence to the glitz and riches that accompany casino-fed wealth. The transformation coincided with the rebirth of Palm Springs, home to one of the tribe's two posh casino resorts and large swaths of tribal land, and economic gains across the checkerboard reservations in the Coachella Valley.
SPORTS
November 8, 1986
On Oct. 28, The Times reported that Gary Pettis of the Angels and Lloyd Moseby of the Toronto Blue Jays had been involved in an altercation with a group of Cahuilla Indians in Palm Springs. The story (implied) that Gary and Lloyd may have provoked the incident by taking a wrong turn and refusing to leave when asked. As a great admirer of these gentlemen, I'd like to set the record straight. Gary and Lloyd were in Palm Springs to participate in a baseball skills competition which raised over $100,000 for the Special Olympics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1994 | LAUREN STRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the Torres Martinez band of Desert Cahuilla Indians protested the dumping of sludge on their reservation Thursday, carrying picket signs and blocking the path of trucks carrying sewage to their community in this rural town. Private waste management companies truck more than 3,000 tons of solid waste to the reservation from Los Angeles and Orange counties each week, dumping it on 120 acres they lease from Torres Martinez tribal member Geraldine Ibanez.
OPINION
September 19, 2008
Re "Stacked deck," editorial, Sept. 15 The Times' editorial too hastily criticizes the Legislature's effort to rein in the growing industry of unregulated charity casino bingo. The editorial failed to mention that operators of these machines are not currently subject to any regulatory oversight, nor is there any requirement to pay the charities a reasonable percentage of their income. The California attorney general said in May that these electronic bingo devices are unlawful under the California Penal Code and no longer should be used.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1988 | LYNN SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Some say Orange began 100 years ago when the township, developed by law partners and landowners Alfred Chapman and Andrew Glassell, received its incorporation papers. But others take the long view. To them, California once was called Aztlan, "the place of the stork." Its citizens danced with fire, sang bird songs and roasted their corn in smoldering oak.
NEWS
October 21, 1994 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If this were suburbia, the battle among neighbors might be conducted in a more conventional way: in court or at City Hall or through the homeowners association. But here in the Coachella Valley, angry residents--reinforced by out-of-towners--have blockaded a neighbor's property since Monday, erected overnight tent encampments and staged passionate Native American ceremonial dances under the full moon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Katherine Siva Saubel, an elder of the Cahuilla Indian tribe of Southern California, once described herself as "just a voice in the wilderness all by myself. " She meant that she had few people with whom she could speak the Cahuilla language or sing the songs that conveyed her people's ancient stories. "My race," she told The Times in 2000, "is dying. " Now Saubel, long its feistiest guardian, has died. "It's a huge loss … the end of an era," said Nathalie Colin, an ethno-historian at the Malki Museum near Banning, which Saubel co-founded more than 45 years ago to preserve Cahuilla history and traditions.
OPINION
September 19, 2008
Re "Stacked deck," editorial, Sept. 15 The Times' editorial too hastily criticizes the Legislature's effort to rein in the growing industry of unregulated charity casino bingo. The editorial failed to mention that operators of these machines are not currently subject to any regulatory oversight, nor is there any requirement to pay the charities a reasonable percentage of their income. The California attorney general said in May that these electronic bingo devices are unlawful under the California Penal Code and no longer should be used.
NEWS
February 24, 2004 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
A MIRAGE, MAYBE? WE'RE HEADED BY CAR TO THE END of a smooth, wriggling blacktop road in a desert full of jagged edges, sharp needles and heavy sand. We rumble through the Coachella Valley, trailing clouds of dust, climb to a ridge, then step down between sun-blasted hillocks into a scene to startle and gladden any thirsty wanderer: Palm Canyon, gloriously moist, teeming with about 3,000 fan palms along a trickling creek. This is the largest natural palm oasis in North America.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians has obtained $140 million in bank financing to build a $95-million casino in Palm Springs and repay construction loans for the Rancho Mirage gambling hall it opened in 2001, attorneys for the tribe said.
MAGAZINE
December 10, 2000 | TOM GORMAN, Tom Gorman is a Times staff writer. His last article for the magazine explored the future of Las Vegas
Richard Milanovich, who doesn't like to gamble because he doesn't like losing money, grins broadly from the podium at the Spa Hotel and Casino in downtown Palm Springs as he gives away a million dollars of the casino's gambling profits. "Oh, this is so much fun," he says, announcing a $150,000 donation to the Palm Springs Fire Department.
NEWS
May 24, 1997 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You can't miss it," the casino manager said. And you can't. Past the giant grimacing terra cotta lizard, past Lost Goose Ranch and the "Beer to Go" market, way out in what looks like a boulder farm, you'll find it: The Cahuilla Creek Restaurant and Casino. Home of big-bucks bingo, a $4.95 grilled ham-and-cheese special and 205 electronic gambling machines that the federal government considers illegal.
NEWS
May 24, 1997 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You can't miss it," the casino manager said. And you can't. Past the giant grimacing terra cotta lizard, past Lost Goose Ranch and the "Beer to Go" market, way out in what looks like a boulder farm, you'll find it: The Cahuilla Creek Restaurant and Casino. Home of big-bucks bingo, a $4.95 grilled ham-and-cheese special and 205 electronic gambling machines that the federal government considers illegal.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alvino Siva had scarcely passed 5 years of age when the Cahuilla Indian Bird Songs first stirred his soul. The 1920s were drawing to a close, and Siva was living on the Agua Caliente Reservation east of here, in a stark desert land shared with the cactus and coyote. On holidays and other festive occasions, the bird songs would emerge--flowing from the lips of Cahuilla tribal elders who, in turn, had adopted them from their forebears.
NEWS
October 21, 1994 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If this were suburbia, the battle among neighbors might be conducted in a more conventional way: in court or at City Hall or through the homeowners association. But here in the Coachella Valley, angry residents--reinforced by out-of-towners--have blockaded a neighbor's property since Monday, erected overnight tent encampments and staged passionate Native American ceremonial dances under the full moon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1994 | LAUREN STRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the Torres Martinez band of Desert Cahuilla Indians protested the dumping of sludge on their reservation Thursday, carrying picket signs and blocking the path of trucks carrying sewage to their community in this rural town. Private waste management companies truck more than 3,000 tons of solid waste to the reservation from Los Angeles and Orange counties each week, dumping it on 120 acres they lease from Torres Martinez tribal member Geraldine Ibanez.
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