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OPINION
November 14, 2012
The trustees of California State University did the right thing Tuesday by putting off any discussion of new fees designed to keep students from using more than their share of university resources. Now the university should scrap the plan altogether and start over. There are more equitable and more effective ways to accomplish their goal. It's not the first time the board of trustees has been scheduled to vote on an ill-conceived plan before the students, faculty and the public have had a chance to weigh in. Administrators said the fees weren't about bringing in new income but rather were intended to change student behavior.
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SPORTS
April 5, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
Jacob Amaya, a freshman shortstop-pitcher at Covina Northview, has committed to Cal State Fullerton.   Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
  California State University campuses are accepting applications for the fall 2014 term, officials said. Enrollment is expected to increase by about 6,000 students, helped by an infusion of funding from Proposition 30, Gov. Jerry Brown's voter-approved measure that temporarily raises certain taxes for education and other purposes. Even with the new funding, however, the system is expected to turn away some 20,000 eligible students because of drastic funding cuts made in previous years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Two Cal State Dominguez Hills professors launched a petition drive Thursday to block a proposed "success fee" that would raise costs for students. The push came a day after President Willie J. Hagan advised in a campus email that he would recommend to Cal State Chancellor Timothy P. White that the fee be approved. White recently approved so-called student success fees at San Diego State and Cal State Fullerton. Eleven of Cal State's 23 campuses have now enacted the fees, with most revenue used to hire faculty and counselors and improve other student services that suffered during a period of budget cuts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
Nearly 20,000 more students and 1,000 more classes would be accommodated next year under a preliminary budget plan that will be presented to California State University trustees Tuesday. The plan seeks an additional $250 million from the state and, in a statement likely to cheer the hearts of students and their families, assumes there will be no increase in tuition for the 2014-15 academic year. More than 430,000 students attend Cal State's 23 campuses, which make up the largest system of higher education in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
As the California State University system announced a record number of applications Wednesday, a new study found that the system should study its placement exams, eligibility standards and other factors to determine why so many entering students are not college-ready. Reasons could include placement exams that don't accurately predict college-level performance, campuses admitting students who are not among the top third of high school graduates, inadequate high school coursework and a lack of financial incentives to improve outcomes, according to the nonpartisan Legislative Analyst's Office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Students opposed to the increasing use of campus fees to pay for academic programs are expected to rally at a meeting of the Cal State trustees Wednesday. Campuses in San Diego and Fullerton recently joined nine others in enacting so-called "student success fees" to help pay for more classes, faculty hiring and other basic educational services. The Dominguez Hills campus is currently considering a $280 per semester fee that, if approved by a campus committee and Chancellor Timothy P. White, would take effect next fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
California State University students this fall will be able to enroll in online classes offered at other Cal State campuses, the latest move by the state's public universities to expand online learning. The program will offer 36 fully online classes in high-demand subjects such as biology, physical geography, statistics, astronomy and business finance. University officials hope that offering the hard-to-get classes as an online option will help students obtain degrees and graduate faster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2010 | By Carla Rivera
California State University is embarking on an ambitious initiative to raise its graduation rates and help more low-income and minority students earn degrees, even as it faces perhaps the grimmest budget outlook in its history. The university is setting a goal of boosting its six-year graduation rate by 8% by 2016, bringing it to 54%, in line with the top national averages at similar institutions. University leaders say they hope to raise graduation rates for underrepresented minority students by 10%, cutting in half what has been a thorny achievement gap in degree completion compared with white students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2009 | Carla Rivera
California's education leaders on Saturday lauded the release of $3.1 billion in federal economic stimulus funds for education, which includes more than half a billion dollars for hard-pressed colleges and universities. The state's universities are facing budget-related enrollment cutbacks, higher fees and class reductions in the fall, and officials said they hoped some of the most painful cuts could be avoided.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Dozens of students rallied at a meeting of the California State University governing board Wednesday, chanting and hoisting signs that urged the chancellor and trustees to roll back "success fees" that are raising costs on many campuses. More than 100 students marched in front of the police-guarded entrance of the chancellor's Long Beach office shouting, "We got 99 problems and student debt is one," and "No cuts, no fees, education should be free. " Campuses in San Diego and Fullerton recently joined nine others in enacting the fees to help pay for more classes, faculty hiring, counseling and other services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Students opposed to the increasing use of campus fees to pay for academic programs are expected to rally at a meeting of the Cal State trustees Wednesday. Campuses in San Diego and Fullerton recently joined nine others in enacting so-called "student success fees" to help pay for more classes, faculty hiring and other basic educational services. The Dominguez Hills campus is currently considering a $280 per semester fee that, if approved by a campus committee and Chancellor Timothy P. White, would take effect next fall.
SPORTS
March 22, 2014 | By Gary Klein
Cal State Northridge's women's basketball team is focused on Sunday's NCAA tournament game against South Carolina. But when the Matadors arrived in Seattle on Friday, one of their topics of discussion was 14th-seeded Mercer's upset of perennial power Duke in the NCAA men's tournament. "It lets you know that anything can happen on any given day," Northridge guard Ashlee Guay said during a phone interview. "It's motivational. " Northridge (18-14), the No. 16-seeded team, will try to knock off top-seeded South Carolina (27-4)
SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | By Gary Klein
USC's women's basketball team gathered Monday among family, fans and athletic department personnel to learn its NCAA tournament opponent and destination. A stirring run to win the Pac-12 Conference tournament March 9 ensured there would be no sense of bubble-induced foreboding, only eager anticipation. When USC's name flashed during the televised announcement of the 64-team field, the reception room in the Galen Center erupted in cheers and applause. USC, making its first tournament appearance since 2006, will play St. John's on Saturday in Knoxville, Tenn.
SPORTS
March 15, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
The seventh-seeded team got shot to seventh heaven Saturday night when Cal Poly defeated Cal State Northridge, 61-59, to win the Big West tournament championship at Honda Center. The Mustangs (13-19) lost nine of their last 11 regular-season games before winning three straight in Anaheim to earn the school's first NCAA tournament bid. In three days, Cal Poly defeated No. 2 UC Santa Barbara, No. 1 UC Irvine and No. 5 Northridge to become the lowest-seeded Big West team to win the conference tournament.
SPORTS
March 14, 2014 | By Chris Dufresne
The best first-round game of the Big West tournament on Thursday got the least notice because it ended at 10:56 p.m. Pacific time in front of a sparse crowd at the Honda Center. Cal State Northridge's 87-84 overtime win over Hawaii, however, deserved more than a tack-on blurb at the end of a long day. Northridge, under first-year coach Reggie Theus, blew a 16-point first-half lead but rallied back from 13 points in the second half. The fifth-seeded Matadors tied the score at 74 on senior Josh Greene's three-pointer with 12 seconds left in the second half.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
California State University officials were warned Tuesday that course scheduling decisions on many campuses may be forcing students to take high-cost extension classes to complete their degrees,  which would violate state law. A report by the state auditor criticized aspects of the system's two-tier education plan, which provides state-funded courses during the academic year and the same classes at a higher cost typically during winter and...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
A Southern California tribal manager and a Woodland Hills attorney were among those appointed to the California State University Board of Trustees by Gov. Jerry Brown on Thursday. Adam Day, 44, of Alpine in San Diego County, is an assistant manager for the Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation who has also worked extensively as a policy advisor for local San Diego lawmakers. Day, a Republican, was a defense and foreign affairs legislative assistant for U.S. Sen. Pete Wilson in 1990.
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