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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first subdivision in Calabasas wasn't a swank gated community or collection of mini-mansions of the kind the city is famous for today. It was a rakish art colony full of eccentric little cottages and studios, some designed by modern architectural master Rudolph Schindler. Arlene Bernholtz and George French recently drove through the city's winding streets pointing out remnants of Park Moderne, the artists colony that once flourished among the oaks and manzanita.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2009 | By Richard Winton
At least four red-haired girls and three boys are now believed to have been victims of the so-called ginger attacks at a Calabasas middle school that were inspired by a Facebook message, a Los Angeles County sheriff's investigation has revealed. The seven victims were targeted in a series of assaults at or near A.E. Wright Middle School that began early Friday after the perpetrators acted on a Facebook message stating that it was "Kick a Ginger Day," authorities said. Ginger is a label given to people with red hair, freckles and fair skin.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1995 | FRANK MANNING
A controversial plan to convert a Calabasas neighborhood into a gated community will be discussed tonight by the City Council. Opponents say there's no guarantee that the $500,000 project would enhance property values or make their neighborhood safer. They accuse the Calabasas Hills Homeowners Assn., which is pushing the plan, of ignoring their concerns. "Their tactics of employing greed and fear to pass a plan is shallow and insulting," Dominic Bonelli wrote in a letter to the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2008 | Katherine Tulich, Special to The Times
NESTLED IN the oak-filled foothills of the Santa Monica Mountains in western L.A. County, Calabasas is an upscale community firmly rooted in small-town charm. The origin of its name is, however, less certain. It's believed original settlements of Chumash Indians named the area Calabasas, from the Indian word for "where the wild geese fly," while a more popular theory claims it comes from the Spanish word for pumpkin, an interpretation celebrated by the area's annual Pumpkin Festival in October.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1995 | FRANK MANNING
Pacific Bell broke ground Monday in Calabasas on a project to replace the company's outdated copper cable system with a fiber optic network, as part of a plan to eventually rewire much of the state. Installation of the company's "Communications Superhighway" will improve telephone service and provide a means for Pacific Bell to enter local cable television markets, executives said. It will allow the company to deliver hundreds of channels of cable programming and interactive video services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1998 | ERIC RIMBERT
The Calabasas Library will have its grand opening Saturday. In a 10 a.m. ceremony, city officials and library staff members will welcome the public to the first city-run library. In May the City Council decided to assume control of the facility after facing red tape with the county. "We were unable to extend the hours on Sundays and we couldn't staff the library with a full-time librarian," library Manager Field G. Weber said.
REAL ESTATE
May 21, 2006 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
Just name it, and this Calabasas house probably has it. The home, built in 1987, underwent a major remodel in 2005 and gained a variety of bells and whistles. An indoor basketball court, wine-tasting/catering kitchen and three-story atrium with a retractable roof are just a few of these added features. Among others are an art gallery, an in-home gym, a home theater and a 12-car subterranean garage, which added an extra 3,000 square feet to the original 9,000-square-foot house plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2000 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
Although few volunteers are expected at Saturday's annual Creek Cleanup, officials hope the event will draw attention to trash that is clogging local creeks. Despite distribution of thousands of fliers through the local schools--and the promise of free gifts and refreshments to participants--no one has called to say he or she is willing to pick up debris on Saturday, said Heather Lea Merenda, storm water program manager for Calabasas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1997 | GREG RIPPEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two fires--one of them accidentally ignited by a brush-clearing crew--blackened about 25 acres Monday in Sun Valley and Calabasas before being extinguished by scores of firefighters, authorities said. The largest of the fires, which started about 2:20 p.m. at Wentworth Street and Stonehurst Avenue, burned about 20 acres of brush and grass south of Hansen Dam and east of Hansen Dam Golf Course, Los Angeles Fire Department spokesman Bob Collins said. It was put out in about half an hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1997
The land around Jon Morris' home has returned to life: poppies, irises, wildflowers and grasses bloom on once-blackened hillsides. Four months ago, a firestorm passed by Morris' home as it raced through the hills of Malibu and Calabasas. As the flames bore down, Morris, a veteran of four other brush fires, stood his ground.
REAL ESTATE
May 21, 2006 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
Just name it, and this Calabasas house probably has it. The home, built in 1987, underwent a major remodel in 2005 and gained a variety of bells and whistles. An indoor basketball court, wine-tasting/catering kitchen and three-story atrium with a retractable roof are just a few of these added features. Among others are an art gallery, an in-home gym, a home theater and a 12-car subterranean garage, which added an extra 3,000 square feet to the original 9,000-square-foot house plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Calabasas developer has lost his bid to block a ballot argument that criticizes a resort and spa he hopes to build in the Santa Monica Mountains. Brian Boudreau sued homeowner Mary Hubbard, accusing her of making "false and misleading" statements about his proposed 152-acre project near Malibu Canyon in a ballot argument prepared for a Nov. 8 "advisory" election for Calabasas voters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2003 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Its blueprints say the place is built of steel. People say it's actually made of Stelle. The $26-million campus that is scheduled to open Jan. 5 in Calabasas is being viewed as a tribute to a couple who helped turn a desolate, 89-square-mile area into one of Los Angeles County's most desirable places to live. The Alice C. Stelle Middle School will house as many as 1,000 students. Engineers say its steel construction is what makes it unusual. Residents say its name is what makes it important.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
The popular Calabasas Farmers Market is moving Saturday to the site of the city's future civic center. The new site is on Park Sorrento next to the Calabasas Commons shopping center. Officials said the move was the result of a change in property ownership and a fee increase.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2003 | Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writer
The city of Calabasas won permission Tuesday to continue its court battle in its long-running fight against Ahmanson Ranch, where 3,050 homes are slated to be built in the Santa Monica Mountains. Both the city and the target of the suit, developer Washington Mutual, claimed victory after the hearing, one of many legal disputes that has stymied development of the 2,800-acre property. The issue has drawn the attention of environmentally conscious celebrities such as Rob Reiner, Robert Kennedy Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The state Court of Appeal has ruled that Soka University may not expand its Calabasas campus in the Santa Monica Mountains. The Buddhist school proposed to increase its building area from 119,500 to 440,000 square feet and more than double student enrollment to 650. That would have required a change in zoning ordinances. "We are exhilarated about this outcome," said Frank Angel, an attorney for the Sierra Club. "This is a very environmentally sensitive area."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1996 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Calabasas residents climbed on the playground equipment, rode their bicycles and held an impromptu roller hockey game at the Juan Bautista de Anza park--the city's newest venue for fun. Under construction for nearly a year, the facility opened to the public last week. It is the first major park built by the young city and visitors said it was a welcome addition to the neighborhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1996 | FRANK MANNING
The city of Calabasas plans a grand opening Jan. 13 for its new library in the Parkway Calabasas Shopping Center. City Council members and Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky are scheduled o be on hand for the event, which begins at 11 a.m. at the library, 23645 Calabasas Road. Until now, the city's library has been housed in a tiny room in City Hall that held about 4,000 volumes. Officials say the new, 1,500-square-foot facility will house about 12,000 volumes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2003 | Karima A. Haynes, Times Staff Writer
If there is one issue that unites the six candidates for Calabasas City Council, it's their opposition to unchecked commercial and residential development which they say would increase traffic, drain public services and harm the environment. Many describe Calabasas as an affluent community with lush parks, good schools and prosperous businesses, yet they realize that outside forces could infringe on their quality of life. On March 4, voters will elect two candidates to the five-member council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2003 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
Seeking to invalidate last month's go-ahead for the Ahmanson Ranch development, Thousand Oaks on Wednesday joined the city of Calabasas' lawsuit against Ventura County. The suit objects to increased traffic, noise and air pollution if the 3,050-home Ahmanson Ranch is allowed to proceed and warns of "serious health impacts" from the presence of toxic chemicals that it contends would be released when the project is graded.
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