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NATIONAL
June 14, 2012 | By David Horsey
If life were a movie, the president of the United States (probably played by Will Smith) would be leaping into action to save humankind from the calamity that a new scientific report says is about to befall the Earth.  A paper prepared by 22 international scientists and just published in the journal Nature warns that overpopulation, environmental destruction and climate change have pushed the world toward a tipping point beyond which lie irreversible,...
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BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Carnival Corp., the world's largest cruise line company, reported a $15-million net loss for the three months that ended Feb. 28 as it continues to rebound from several cruise catastrophes. The Miami-based company that controls nearly 50% of the market through 10 cruise line brands around the world reported $37 million in net profits for the same period in 2013, according to Carnival's latest financial report. Carnival's revenue for ticket sales and onboard spending for the first quarter of 2014 were nearly on par with revenue for the same period last year -- about $3.6 billion.
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NEWS
March 10, 1991 | ED McCULLOUGH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The money vanishes from a deputy governor's toy fund for needy children. A mayor awards a fat contract without bids. The U.S. ambassador accuses a government official of seeking bribes. Corruption has always been around in Argentina, but usually beneath the surface. Now it is coming into the open, and a recent poll indicated only low wages are a greater public concern. President Carlos Menem reluctantly declined the gift of a $90,000 Ferrari.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2013 | By Louis Bayard
And you thought they just had to lie there. According to Amy Tan's scrupulously researched novel "The Valley of Amazement," a courtesan in 1912 Shanghai would have had to master a hundred sexual positions, including "upward, backward, seated, standing, feet pressed on his stomach, legs in the air, the Bucking Horse, the Swaying Bamboo Shoots, Tigress Meets the Dragon, Oysters in the Turtle Shell" - all of it the distillation of "five thousand years...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2000 | STEPHANIE STASSEL and ZANTO PEABODY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Some prepared for unforgettable celebrations. Others prepared for calamity. Many geared up for both at once. Across the San Fernando Valley on Friday, residents made last-minute runs to stock up on everything they deemed necessary to meet the year 2000--from champagne and cash to bullets and crossbows. Merchants reported unprecedented business as cautious customers loaded up on propane, gasoline, nonperishable foods and water.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2008
Has anyone addressed policy implications of firms becoming "too big to fail" ("Bailout could aid firms that buy troubled banks," Sept. 29.)? It appears that a threshold exists, beyond which a firm can now expect government intervention in the event of failure. This will only encourage more reckless risk-taking, since the government will provide a safety net of credit. The taxpayer appears to be held hostage: There seems to be no option but to support a bailout to avoid a far greater calamity.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2009 | Troy Jollimore, Jollimore is the author of "Tom Thomson in Purgatory," which won the 2006 National Book Critics Circle Award in poetry.
Too Much Happiness Stories Alice Munro Alfred A. Knopf: 320 pp., $25.95 "No way this could be seen as probable or possible, unless you think of a blow between the eyes, a sudden calamity," muses the narrator of "Fiction," one of the 10 masterly stories that make up Alice Munro's latest collection, "Too Much Happiness." "The stroke of fate that leaves a man a cripple, the wicked joke that turns clear eyes into blind stones." It sounds as if she were talking about violence.
OPINION
March 20, 2006
Your March 17 editorial "Strategic errors" was substantive but wimpy. The Times is one of the few great U.S. newspapers that has taken a consistently rational position against the war in Iraq, and you should be proud. But your editorial is weak. You sound whiney with words like "moreover," and "but it's scary." Where's the meat? Pack in some muscle. Your issue is that Bush's strategic error may lead to a calamity in Iran that would dwarf the incomprehensible calamity in Iraq. Ironically, even Iran would appear to be afraid of the chimpanzee-like behavior of Bush and his advisors.
OPINION
September 20, 2008
Re "Foreseeable devastation," Opinion, Sept. 13 Amy Wilentz rightfully does not differentiate between democracies and dictatorships when she writes of the helplessness of the Haitian people under both systems in the face of ravaging storms. She is also correct that Haiti's economy is similar to Ronald Reagan's privatized fantasy. Voodoo economics existed in Haiti long before Reagan. The rich are content to throw a morsel to their servants every once in awhile and feel superior to the vast majority of the people -- who are the first to suffer from any calamity befalling the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2002
"Reality" is not apparently enough of "a hot commodity" for the Walt Disney Co. to include the larger political and economic context of last July's Pennsylvania mine calamity in its docudrama ("The art of the ordeal," Nov. 24). Disney was so concerned with "getting the details right" that its producers missed the opportunity to reveal the larger causes of this and numerous other mining "accidents" -- company greed and lack of government oversight of mine safety conditions. While President Bush rushed to the Quecreek mine scene to ham it up with the media, arms around rescued miners, he was cutting the budget for mine safety enforcement.
NEWS
November 21, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
They took a licking and kept on ticking. The Oscar for survival under extreme circumstances goes to ... Our Man (Robert Redford) The movie: "All Is Lost" The setup: Solo sailing expedition goes awry when boat collides with cargo container. The threat: Dehydration, despair and, ultimately, drowning. Survival strategy: Repair hole in ship's hull. Then leisurely prepare a meal(!) and sail aimlessly toward possible help. Skill rating: 3 life preservers Capt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2013 | Tony Barboza
The world's leading climate scientists have for the first time established a limit on the amount of greenhouse gases that can be released before the Earth reaches a tipping point and predicted that it will be surpassed within decades unless swift action is taken to curb the current pace of emissions. The warning was issued Friday by a panel of U.N.-appointed climate change experts meeting in Stockholm. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimated that once a total of 1 trillion tons of carbon dioxide are emitted into atmosphere, the planet will exceed 3.6 degrees of warming, the internationally agreed-upon threshold to the worst effects of climate change.
NATIONAL
September 13, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Fish began dying en masse in the waters around Honolulu after hundreds of thousands of gallons of molasses spilled into Honolulu Harbor early this week, and there's nothing officials can do to clean it up. Thousands of fish have died from the sugary sludge. Crabs lay dead along the harbor bottom while more fish floated listlessly, some seeming to gasp above the surface of the water contaminated by the syrupy sweetener. The spill is one of the worst man-made disasters to hit Hawaii in recent memory, officials said, not least because no one has quite seen anything like it. "There's nothing you can do to clean up molasses," said Jeff Hull, a spokesman for Matson Inc., the company responsible for the leak.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By Margaret Wappler
The Virgins A Novel Pamela Erens Tin House: 288 pp., $15.95 paper It's rare to find a book that summons the delicate emotional state of teenagers - especially when it comes to sex - without being precious or cynical, but Pamela Erens' "The Virgins" beautifully manages that feat. "It sounds laughably dramatic, but don't underestimate the metaphysical yearnings of a seventeen-year-old," the book's preppy narrator reminds us. "We beginners experienced sex as psyche more than body, as vulnerability and power, exposure and flight, being consumed, saved, transfigured.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Partway through Marisha Pessl's second novel, "Night Film," I began to feel as if I had been taken hostage by the book. This, I should hasten to add, is not its intent. The saga of a legendary film director, Stanislas Cordova, and the suicide of his 24-year-old daughter, Ashley, "Night Film" is willfully portentous, claustrophobic even, a novel that means to explore hidden meanings, in which each turn seems to unveil another layer until illusion and reality begin to merge. It is also, at 600-plus pages, at least a third too long, an overwrought narrative that hints at much but delivers little and, for all its feints and twists, remains surprisingly unsuspenseful in the end. Pessl is the much-lauded author of "Special Topics in Calamity Physics," which the New York Times Book Review selected as one of the 10 best books of 2006.
NATIONAL
June 14, 2012 | By David Horsey
If life were a movie, the president of the United States (probably played by Will Smith) would be leaping into action to save humankind from the calamity that a new scientific report says is about to befall the Earth.  A paper prepared by 22 international scientists and just published in the journal Nature warns that overpopulation, environmental destruction and climate change have pushed the world toward a tipping point beyond which lie irreversible,...
SPORTS
February 17, 1990
The really troubling aspect of Tyson-Douglas is that sleazeballs such as Don King can wield so much power in a sport with so much money on the table. The sport can bear all his excesses and call him flamboyant, colorful or eccentric as long as things go King's way. But throw in a Buster Douglas calamity where King stands to lose big, and the facade drops and the man reverts to the ugly, fast-talking thug he always was. The media think Don King is cute. Sportswriters tolerate and condescend to him, but never do they take him seriously as a threat to a sport they love.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1988
In response to the sick story "Voters Give Nuclear Plant a Chance to Prove Itself," (Part I, June 9) regarding the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant: The continuous controversies over nuclear power plants must be brought to a climax before man shames himself beyond despair--something that destroys all hope. It is going to take only one small boo-boo at Rancho Seco, Diablo Canyon or San Onofre power plants to set off a disastrous chain reaction calamity that in no way can be quenched by any methods known to date.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2012 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
Stubborn does not come close to describing the desert tortoise, a species that did its evolving more than 220 million years ago and has since remained resolutely prehistoric. Its slowpoke take on biological adaptation has exposed modern vulnerabilities. The persnickety reptile is today beset by respiratory infections and prone to disease. Its only defenses are the shell on its back and the scent of its unspeakably foul urine. FOR THE RECORD: The subheadline on an earlier online version of this article erred in describing the desert tortoises as "endangered creatures.
WORLD
March 19, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Kazuhisa Takeuchi was taking advantage of a rare moment of calm between the afternoon and evening shifts at his Sendai dialysis clinic, chatting on the telephone with a colleague about a patient, when he felt himself lifted from his chair by a force immediately recognizable to anybody who grew up in this part of Japan. "Earthquake, bye," the 55-year-old doctor said, slamming down the receiver. When the unearthly shaking had ended, everything in his office was on the floor ?
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