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HEALTH
January 21, 2008 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
A carrot a day may keep osteoporosis away -- if that carrot has been genetically modified. "Fruits and vegetables are generally a pretty low source of calcium," says Jay Morris, a researcher at Baylor College of Medicine's Children's Nutrition Research Center in Houston and lead author of a study published online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
April 4, 2014 | By Dana Sullivan Kilroy
Not milk? Choosing milk for your morning cereal or coffee used to be pretty simple: skim, low-fat or whole. These days, though, market shelves and refrigerators are crowded with an array of alternatives: soy, almond, rice, hemp and more. While some people opt for these beverages because they're vegan, they have allergies or because they're lactose intolerant, the beverages are increasingly popular for another reason too. "We're all being encouraged to eat a more plant-based diet, and some of these products fit that category," says Andrea Giancoli, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and a policy analyst at the Beach Cities Health District Blue Zones Project in Hermosa Beach, an initiative to develop healthier communities.
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NEWS
May 26, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Calcium is important for bone health, but medical experts have long debated how much calcium people should consume to reduce the risk of osteoporosis later in life. A new study suggests that the U.S. recommendation for adult women may be unnecessarily high. The recommended dietary allowance for women ages 51 and older in the United States is 1,200 milligrams a day --  compared with the recommendation in the United Kingdom of 700 milligrams per day. The new study, published online Tuesday in the British Medical Journal , suggests that consuming more than 700 mg a day won't help.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
More than half of American women over the age of 60 take vitamin D and calcium supplements, but the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said this week that they're probably wasting their money. In a new recommendations from the federal government's expert panel on preventive medicine, the task force says that most postmenopausal women should not take vitamin D and calcium to reduce their risk of bone fractures. The dosages assessed were 400 international units (IUs) of vitamin D3 and 1,000 milligrams of calcium per day. The conclusions are based on an analysis of six randomized trials designed to study the health effects of vitamin D and calcium supplements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
A hormone that helps the body absorb calcium apparently is ineffective for treating women who already have the bone-thinning disease osteoporosis, researchers report. The study found the hormone calcitriol failed to increase bone mass among a group of 72 post-menopausal women with osteoporosis. "The goal of treatment of post-menopausal osteoporosis is to prevent further fractures," said Drs.
HEALTH
May 1, 2006 | From Times wire reports
Older women who took calcium supplements twice a day reduced their risk of breaking a bone, researchers have found, but getting them to take the pills proved to be a problem. Nearly half the 1,460 healthy women older than 70 who participated in the study did not consistently take the twice-daily 600-milligram pills, which led the researchers to doubt whether supplements could be useful as preventive therapy.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
A public-interest group said Monday that the country's largest maker of dietary calcium supplements, Carson-based Leiner Health Products Group, has agreed to reduce the amount of lead in the tablets by the start of February.
NEWS
August 26, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Daily doses of calcium can reduce the physical and psychological symptoms of premenstrual syndrome by at least half, according to new research that points toward a low-cost, simple remedy for a condition that affects millions of women.
HEALTH
September 22, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
Taking extra calcium before going abroad might cut short a case of traveler's diarrhea. A three-week study of healthy men intentionally infected with E. coli -- the bacterium that commonly contaminates food and drinking water in less developed countries -- found that high doses of calcium increased resistance to the infection.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Calcium supplements can retard bone loss associated with osteoporosis, but only in older women who have been postmenopausal for at least five years and who have calcium-deficient diets, a study published in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine reveals. Among women who have been postmenopausal five years or less, calcium supplements appear ineffective in preventing a very rapid phase of bone loss, said Dr.
SCIENCE
May 23, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Taking calcium supplements increases the risk of having a heart attack, Swiss and German researchers reported Wednesday. The finding adds to the growing body of evidence that such supplements increase the risk to those who take them while providing only minimal benefits. The study is considered important because large numbers of people, especially elderly women, continue to take the supplements in hopes of minimizing loss of bone density. The body of evidence now seems to suggest that calcium consumed as part of a normal diet can, indeed, increase bone density and perhaps help lower blood pressure, but that supplements may be too risky for most people to take.
NEWS
May 26, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Calcium is important for bone health, but medical experts have long debated how much calcium people should consume to reduce the risk of osteoporosis later in life. A new study suggests that the U.S. recommendation for adult women may be unnecessarily high. The recommended dietary allowance for women ages 51 and older in the United States is 1,200 milligrams a day --  compared with the recommendation in the United Kingdom of 700 milligrams per day. The new study, published online Tuesday in the British Medical Journal , suggests that consuming more than 700 mg a day won't help.
NEWS
April 20, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Calcium supplements appear to slightly raise the risk of heart attack, a new analysis suggests. But the data, from postmenopausal women who took supplements over seven years, are far from conclusive. So don’t throw out the multivitamins just yet – or those calcium supplements that many women take for bone health. Not all doctors are convinced that this study, led by the University of Auckland, is the last word on calcium supplements. Or that it changes the debate at all. The results from previous studies of calcium and heart attack risk, including ones from the same research team, have been widely criticized.
NEWS
April 3, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
A team of Harvard researchers may have discovered a new way to ward off the red, itchy rash caused by allergies to nickel.  All it takes is a dab of topical cream, according to research published online Sunday in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. Thirty million to 45 million people -- more than 10% of the U.S. population -- are sensitive to nickel found in common objects including jewelry and coins, the paper reported.  Among the sufferers: study lead author Jeffrey M. Karp of Harvard's Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, a nanoparticles specialist who sought a way to treat the irritating allergy.
NEWS
January 18, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Calcium channel blockers prescribed to lower blood pressure and macrolide antibiotics to treat infections can combine to sharply reduce blood pressure in the elderly, leading to an increased risk of hospitalization and other problems, Canadian researchers reported Monday. The combination of drugs probably reduces blood pressure in younger patients as well, but represents a bigger risk in the elderly, who are already at increased risk of falls, said Dr. David Juurlink of the Sunnybrook Research Institute in Toronto, who led the study reported in the Canadian Medical Assn.
HEALTH
January 10, 2011 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
I suffer from digestive upset when taking antibiotics, and I'd like to counter that with the probiotic bacteria in yogurt. Does taking antibiotics with yogurt affect absorption of antibiotics? It depends to a certain extent on the antibiotic, but many should not be taken within a few hours of yogurt or other calcium-rich foods. That includes antibiotics in the tetracycline family and drugs such as ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin, but not ofloxacin. Fruit juice fortified with calcium also can interfere with antibiotic absorption.
NEWS
October 26, 1993 | THE WASHINGTON POST
Adding a modest calcium supplement to the diets of adolescent girls can significantly help build bone and protect them from future ravages of osteoporosis, the brittle-bone disorder that develops in an estimated 25 million Americans, a study has found. According to an 18-month study published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1999
Adding calcium to the diet can keep you from getting tumors in your large intestine. The effect is moderate but significant, Dr. J.A. Baron of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, N.H., writes in today's New England Journal of Medicine. The study looked at 832 people who underwent surgery for colorectal adenomas--benign tumors--at six hospitals around the country. About half got calcium supplements and half got placebos.
OPINION
December 12, 2010 | By Karen Stabiner
The Institute of Medicine recently upended the health apple cart with a new study that says we don't need as much calcium or vitamin D as we've been told. In fact, taking the kind of megadose that makes you feel virtuous and keeps the supplement industry healthy can lead to kidney stones, with calcium, and kidney or heart damage, with D. If that sounds alarmist, let me quote directly from the Institute of Medicine's statement, which says that "some signals suggest there are greater risks of death and chronic disease associated with long-term high vitamin D intake.
HEALTH
December 6, 2010 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
You're trying to do your bones a favor when you pop your daily calcium pill. And doctors who recommend the pills are trying to do patients a favor too. What then, to make of a suggested link between daily calcium supplements and a slightly increased risk of heart attacks? The findings, announced in July and noted in last week's Institute of Medicine report on vitamin D and calcium, caused concern among patients and some doctors alike. But many physicians say that the research needs to be confirmed before people start tossing away their calcium pills.
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