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Calcium

NEWS
April 3, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
A team of Harvard researchers may have discovered a new way to ward off the red, itchy rash caused by allergies to nickel.  All it takes is a dab of topical cream, according to research published online Sunday in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. Thirty million to 45 million people -- more than 10% of the U.S. population -- are sensitive to nickel found in common objects including jewelry and coins, the paper reported.  Among the sufferers: study lead author Jeffrey M. Karp of Harvard's Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, a nanoparticles specialist who sought a way to treat the irritating allergy.
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HEALTH
January 18, 2010
Even a good night's sleep doesn't totally compensate for many weeks of sleep loss. And it's the late-night period when the accumulation of sleep loss may be most apparent. Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital examined the effect of weeks of insufficient sleep on performance. They scheduled nine healthy volunteers to live for three weeks on a schedule consisting of 43-hour periods in which they were awake for 33 of those hours. That equals about 5.6 hours of sleep for every 24 hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Women 65 and older who take calcium channel blockers--a widely used type of drug for high blood pressure and heart disease--are about twice as likely to develop breast cancer, researchers from the University of Washington reported in Wednesday's edition of the journal Cancer. But the risk of uncontrolled high blood pressure may outweigh any possible added risk of breast cancer, the National Institutes of Health said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1985 | Associated Press
The high doses of Vitamin B-6 sometimes prescribed for premenstrual syndrome may be toxic, according to a University of Chicago scientist whose dietary guidelines mirror those recommended by other physicians debating the keys to women's nutritional health. Dr.
NEWS
August 23, 1986 | United Press International
People taking 20 or 30 bone meal tablets every day as a calcium supplement may be giving themselves lead poisoning, a researcher said Friday. The bone meal is safe at normal doses, but some contains minute amounts of lead that could accumulate in the body with so-called "megadoses" taken by many vitamin enthusiasts, said Dr. Badi Boulos of the University of Illinois School of Public Health. "If people are taking the normal two or three tablets a day, we're not concerned," Boulos said.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1997 | (Associated Press)
State Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren settled with makers of calcium supplements and antacids to reduce their lead content--an agreement that consumer advocates called inadequate and unsafe. Lungren said eight manufacturers, including the makers of Rolaids, DI-GEL and Os-Cal, had agreed for the first time to limits on lead, a substance that has been linked to birth defects.
NEWS
January 26, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Add one more to the long list of ills associated with coffee drinking. Researchers at UC San Diego report today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. that women who drink more than two cups of caffeinated coffee per day suffer a loss of bone density that can lead to bone fractures in later life. Scientists have suspected such a link for several years, but the report provides the strongest evidence of its existence.
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In a surprising discovery, UCLA researchers have found that atherosclerosis, better known as hardening of the arteries, may arise in part through the formation of bone in the arteries. The finding, reported today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, could open the door to new therapies to prevent atherosclerosis, which is treated by controlling intake of cholesterol and fats, said Dr. Linda Demer, associate chief of cardiology at the UCLA School of Medicine.
HEALTH
July 26, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Every so often, we take a candid look at the private dietary lives of people whose food choices need a makeover. Up this week: the kitchen and dining habits of 22-year-old Jessica Watson and her boyfriend, 31-year-old Todd Preboski. She's a vegan; he eats fish but no other animal-based foods. Such diets may conjure up images of fresh vegetables and fruits, nuts, tofu and whole grains. But a lack of time and planning have cornered the couple into relying too often on Taco Bell burritos, protein bars and potato chips.
FOOD
March 23, 1986 | DR. JEAN MAYER and JEANNE GOLDBERG
Question: You have mentioned that water hardness can affect the natural pigments in food and result in color changes. Can you explain what is meant by water hardness? Answer: Hard water is simply water that contains natural salts. There are two types of hard water. In one, called "temporarily hard," the calcium, magnesium and iron bicarbonate are precipitated when water is boiled. Over a long period of time, deposits of these mineral salts build up.
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