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Calcium

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Calcium supplements commonly given to pregnant women to prevent dangerously high blood pressure called preeclampsia don't work, a surprising new government study has found. Preeclampsia afflicts about 5% of pregnant women and can be fatal to both mother and child.
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HEALTH
December 28, 2009 | By Brendan Borrell
It seems like the pinnacle of medical science: For just a few hundred dollars, you can walk into just about any hospital in Southern California and ask a doctor to check your arteries for buildup of heart-attack-inducing calcium plaque. Most of the time, what goes on inside our bodies is a mystery, but there's something satisfying in the thought that a sophisticated piece of equipment can measure just how clogged our arteries really are (and how much more junk food we can afford, or not afford, to eat)
HEALTH
September 29, 2003 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
Perhaps you've seen it touted in television infomercials as a wellspring of long life and a treatment for, among other things, colon cancer, multiple sclerosis, lupus and heart disease. Federal regulators too have seen the advertisements for coral calcium, and they're not buying the claims. They have, however, claimed some of the goods. In late June, U.S. marshals, operating at the behest of the Food and Drug Administration, seized about $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1998
Fruit-eating animals regularly choose figs even when other fruits are available, but researchers have not known why. The answer is probably calcium, according to a new study in today's issue of the journal Nature. A team headed by Timothy G. O'Brien of the Wildlife Conservation Society Indonesia Program surveyed figs throughout the world and found that, on average, they contain three times as much calcium as other fruits.
HEALTH
May 1, 2006 | Sally Squires, Special to The Times
Parents and their offspring sometimes seem as if they have little in common. But both often fall short on a key nutrient: calcium. This mineral is best known for building strong bones, but it does much more. Without sufficient calcium, the body can't maintain healthy blood vessels, produce enough hormones or enable nerves to signal each other.
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Are calcium supplements safe? That's a tough call for consumers, considering that several prestigious health organizations and government agencies can't agree on the answer. But even the combatants in a new controversy about lead content in calcium supplements agree that Americans should continue taking the supplements, which help prevent the crippling bone disease osteoporosis. Adequate calcium intake is also crucial for pregnant women to assist in fetal development.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal advisory panel Wednesday called for a national public health strategy to encourage Americans--starting from childhood--to consume higher levels of calcium to ensure the growth of strong bones and reduce the risk of osteoporosis, a crippling bone disease.
HEALTH
April 4, 2014 | By Dana Sullivan Kilroy
Not milk? Choosing milk for your morning cereal or coffee used to be pretty simple: skim, low-fat or whole. These days, though, market shelves and refrigerators are crowded with an array of alternatives: soy, almond, rice, hemp and more. While some people opt for these beverages because they're vegan, they have allergies or because they're lactose intolerant, the beverages are increasingly popular for another reason too. "We're all being encouraged to eat a more plant-based diet, and some of these products fit that category," says Andrea Giancoli, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and a policy analyst at the Beach Cities Health District Blue Zones Project in Hermosa Beach, an initiative to develop healthier communities.
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