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April 5, 2010 | By Tony Perry
Residents of Calexico in the Imperial Valley were jolted awake as a 3.1-magnitude earthquake struck at 4:12 a.m. Monday. Lights flickered and some light poles swayed as the aftershock struck the California border town. There were no immediate reports of injuries or property damage. The quake was centered about 34 miles south-southwest of Calexico, according to the U.S . Geological Survey. At the Best Western motel, patrons said it felt as if a large truck had backed into the outside wall, shaking furniture inside the rooms.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By Chris Barton
Fans of Tucson desert-noir band Calexico no doubt went home disappointed Wednesday night as an electrical outage apparently caused by a mischievous animal in a substation left the Henry Fonda Theater in the dark. Still, you can't accuse the band of not trying. Before the show was called off, bandleader Joey Burns took the stage with an indeterminate number of musicians (it was dark, after all) to lead the band through a very unplugged version of the live staple "Minas de Cobre" backed by accordion and mariachi horns.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2012 | By Mikael Wood
Last month's "Algiers" may be Calexico's first record with Los Angeles-based Anti- Records, but for this Arizona outfit the deal represents something of a homecoming. Joey Burns and John Convertino originally met in L.A. when both were playing as members of Giant Sand, the long-running alt-country group led by singer-songwriter Howe Gelb. The two moved to Tucson in the early 1990s and began making appropriately windswept desert-rock records as Calexico (the name comes from the Imperial County border town that sits near Interstate 8)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2012 | By Mikael Wood
Last month's "Algiers" may be Calexico's first record with Los Angeles-based Anti- Records, but for this Arizona outfit the deal represents something of a homecoming. Joey Burns and John Convertino originally met in L.A. when both were playing as members of Giant Sand, the long-running alt-country group led by singer-songwriter Howe Gelb. The two moved to Tucson in the early 1990s and began making appropriately windswept desert-rock records as Calexico (the name comes from the Imperial County border town that sits near Interstate 8)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By Chris Barton
Fans of Tucson desert-noir band Calexico no doubt went home disappointed Wednesday night as an electrical outage apparently caused by a mischievous animal in a substation left the Henry Fonda Theater in the dark. Still, you can't accuse the band of not trying. Before the show was called off, bandleader Joey Burns took the stage with an indeterminate number of musicians (it was dark, after all) to lead the band through a very unplugged version of the live staple "Minas de Cobre" backed by accordion and mariachi horns.
NEWS
September 18, 2003 | Jeff Miller
John Convertino speaks slowly and deliberately, not surprising for a man whose band, Calexico, captures the languid pace of the Southwest. The band's songs are full of sparse acoustic passages and mariachi horns, the kind of music often described as "cinematic," with good reason.
WORLD
April 5, 2010 | By Tony Perry and Tracy Wilkinson
A magnitude 7.2 earthquake rocked Mexico's Baja California peninsula Sunday, jolting millions of people from Los Angeles and San Diego to Phoenix and scattering destruction along the U.S.-Mexico border. Emergency services in both the U.S. and Mexico scrambled to assess the extent of casualties and damage, including fallen buildings, buckled roads, cracked water canals, fires and telephone and electrical outages. It appeared that most of the damage was in the twin border cities of Calexico, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2010 | By Tony Perry, Tracy Wilkinson and Ching-Ching Ni
Reporting from Mexico City, Mexicali, Mexico, and Pasadena -- Life began returning to a jittery sort of normal Monday on both sides of the U.S.-Mexican border, one day after a magnitude 7.2 earthquake rumbled through the area around Mexicali, Mexico. Assessment teams inspected buildings and cleanup crews swept up broken glass in Mexicali and its smaller California neighbor, Calexico, both of which sustained modest damage. The death toll rose to two, and more than 230 people were injured.
SPORTS
May 20, 1989
Senior right-hander Monte Jones pitched a no-hitter and struck out 15 to lead Tustin High School to a 4-0 victory over Calexico in the opening round of the Southern Section 3-A baseball playoffs at Tustin. Jones, who walked eight batters, also had two runs batted in. Eric Grove went two for four for Tustin (18-8). He had a double and scored a run. Calexico finished its season 11-10. Jones is 10-2. He led Orange County in strikeouts with 110 during the regular season.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2009 | Tony Perry
The two Marines killed in a traffic accident in Mexicali, Mexico, over the weekend were identified Monday as Lance Cpl. Julio Galvan and Pvt. Isidro Godinez. The two were diesel automotive mechanics with the 1st Marine Division at Camp Pendleton. Galvan, 21, was from Maywood, Ill. Godinez, 19, was from Calexico in the Imperial Valley. The two were killed in an accident about 3 a.m. Friday in Mexicali, across the border from Calexico. A third Marine, whose name was not released, was injured and has undergone surgery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2010 | By Tony Perry and Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
The All-American Canal has long been known as an engineering, hydrological and agricultural marvel, delivering enormous amounts of Colorado River water to arid Imperial County and turning a desert into one of the world's most productive farming regions. But in recent years, it has had another reputation: the spot where hundreds of people have drowned, most of them undocumented migrants from Mexico trying desperately to cross the canal on their way north. By most estimates, more than 500 persons have drowned in the canal since it was completed in 1942.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Last year, when Mariachi Reyna de Los Angeles was invited to open for the reggae-hip-hop- salsa-punk-funk mash-up mavens Ozomatli at the Nokia Theatre, the group wondered how on earth such a concert might be billed. "At first I was, like, 'Really?'" recalled Julissa Murillo, a violinist with the neo-traditional, all-female mariachi group. "Nobody has ever tried anything like that, and I didn't know how they were going to categorize it. " "Categories be damned!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2010 | By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
The 7.2 Mexicali earthquake was so powerful that it shifted the Earth's crust up to 10 feet in Mexico, according to radar images and data released Wednesday by NASA. The Easter Sunday quake also shifted the crust 31 inches near Calexico. The data for the California shift came from NASA satellites and those for the Mexican shift from European and Japanese satellites. Both sets of data were analyzed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Eric Fielding, a JPL geophysicist, said shifts would be obvious in some places because the earth cracked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2010 | By Tony Perry
The Calexico High School Bulldogs track team is preparing to defend its league championship at the biggest meet of the season Thursday. But the meet, scheduled for Calexico, has been moved to El Centro. And the Bulldogs cannot practice on their own turf. The school's athletic field has been declared unsafe because light poles were loosened and bent by the 7.2 magnitude earthquake that struck on Easter Sunday. Schools Supt. Christina Luna is worried that another temblor could send the poles and lights crashing down, killing or severely injuring someone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2010 | By Tony Perry
Residents and public officials on both sides of the border were assessing damage and looking to repair shattered nerves Sunday amid aftershocks from the magnitude 7.2 earthquake that struck on Easter, the strongest to hit the region in more than a century. In the California city of Calexico, most of the city's downtown business district remains closed as structural engineers decide whether the aging buildings can be saved. A squad from the Federal Emergency Management Agency is expected this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2010 | By Tony Perry
The U.S.-Mexico border reopened Tuesday to northbound vehicle traffic, but Calexico's historic downtown district remained closed as inspectors checked for structural damage to buildings in the wake of the magnitude 7.2 earthquake just south of here Easter Sunday. The border crossing had been closed to northbound traffic as officials checked for damage to the federal building, but pedestrians continued to cross through the checkpoint from Mexicali as they fled the aftershocks rocking northern Baja California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2003 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
A swarm of 14 earthquakes, the strongest a magnitude 3.7, struck just south of the Mexican border near Calexico on Thursday, but there were no reports of damage or injuries. Caltech seismologists put the epicenter of the quakes 16 miles southeast of Calexico, in an area that is often seismically active. Their depth was about four miles. The quakes started at 12:30 a.m. and continued until 3:35 p.m., with the 3.7 occurring at 10:03 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2010 | By Tony Perry, Tracy Wilkinson and Ching-Ching Ni
Reporting from Mexico City, Mexicali, Mexico, and Pasadena -- Life began returning to a jittery sort of normal Monday on both sides of the U.S.-Mexican border, one day after a magnitude 7.2 earthquake rumbled through the area around Mexicali, Mexico. Assessment teams inspected buildings and cleanup crews swept up broken glass in Mexicali and its smaller California neighbor, Calexico, both of which sustained modest damage. The death toll rose to two, and more than 230 people were injured.
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