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Cali Cartel

NEWS
June 13, 1995 | Associated Press
Police battled violence and drugs Monday by arresting suspects in a lethal bombing and hunting for the second of two brothers believed to run the notorious Cali cocaine cartel. Several people were arrested as suspects in the bombing of a street festival that killed 29 people Saturday. The bombing came one day after police arrested Gilberto Rodriguez Orejuela, who with his brother, Miguel, leads the Cali cartel. Police carried out more raids Monday in the search for the brother.
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NEWS
February 17, 1996 | STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jesus Amayak Russa, the alleged leader of an Atlantic Coast drug cartel responsible for shipping tons of cocaine to the United States through Central America, Haiti and Mexico, was arrested along with four other suspected cartel members in simultaneous raids in two cities, Colombian authorities announced Friday.
NEWS
May 8, 1993 | From Reuters
Leaders of the feared Cali drug cartel, which the United States says runs most of Colombia's cocaine trade, are considering a mass surrender and an exit from drug trafficking in return for reduced sentences and guarantees for their safety, government sources said Friday. U.S.
NEWS
March 14, 1994 | Associated Press
Colombians went to voting booths Sunday to elect a new Congress that some critics said was being bought by the powerful Cali cocaine cartel. According to preliminary unofficial results, the ruling Liberal Party maintained control over the Senate. The party was also expected to keep its grip on the House of Representatives. Turnout was reportedly low across the country. Final official results were expected late today.
NEWS
July 6, 1989
The reputed No. 3 man in Colombia's Cali drug cartel was arraigned in a Miami prison under tight security for fear fellow cocaine traffickers might try to free him, federal officials said. The Cali cartel--a rival to the better-known Medellin cocaine cartel--operates out of the city of Cali and has grabbed a growing share of Colombia's drug trade, Drug Enforcement Administration officials said. Luis Santacruz Echeverri, 35, was arraigned by U.S.
NEWS
March 13, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
A huge cache of drug money linked to a Cali cartel kingpin may provide the hardest evidence yet for long-standing U.S. charges that drug lords are trafficking narcotics from inside Colombia's prisons. Nearly $5 million in suspected cocaine cash was discovered by police Tuesday in a raid on a house in the southwestern city of Cali, most of it in $100 and $50 bills sealed in wrappers marked "Reserva Federal Bank," an apparent reference to the U.S. Federal Reserve.
WORLD
November 2, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge ordered the release of the former bosses of the notorious Cali cartel, the Rodriguez Orejuela brothers, who in the 1990s controlled up to 80% of the world's cocaine. Miguel and Gilberto Rodriguez Orejuela served about half their sentences, which began in 1995. They participated in a work-study program, usually intended for lesser offenses, to cut their time.
NEWS
August 27, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Cali Mayor Mauricio Guzman Cuevas was arrested on charges he accepted $200,000 from a company fronting for the drug cartel that long dominated his city. Guzman, 42, a member of the Liberal Party, has denied wrongdoing. A judge in Cali also sentenced Manuel Francisco Becerra, a former comptroller, education minister and governor with the Liberal Party, to six years in prison for taking at least $300,000 from the Cali cartel to finance the 1994 congressional campaigns of political allies.
WORLD
February 24, 2007 | William C. Rempel, Times Staff Writer
THE official end of the notorious Cali cocaine cartel came late last year here with little more commotion than the rap of a judge's gavel. The Colombian drug lords Miguel Rodriguez Orejuela, 63, and Gilberto Rodriguez Orejuela, 67, entered guilty pleas and were ushered off to federal prison for the next 30 years -- no Miami Vice-like dramatics, no bodies riddled with gunfire in the manner of Medellin rival Pablo Escobar.
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