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Cali Cartel

WORLD
November 3, 2002 | From Reuters
The Colombian government blocked the release from prison of two former bosses of the Cali cocaine cartel a day after a judge infuriated President Alvaro Uribe by ruling that the two powerful drug lords could go free with less than half their sentences served. "The government has ordered that the prisoners not be released while many doubts exist," Uribe said Saturday.
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WORLD
November 2, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge ordered the release of the former bosses of the notorious Cali cartel, the Rodriguez Orejuela brothers, who in the 1990s controlled up to 80% of the world's cocaine. Miguel and Gilberto Rodriguez Orejuela served about half their sentences, which began in 1995. They participated in a work-study program, usually intended for lesser offenses, to cut their time.
NEWS
June 12, 1999 | From Reuters
A onetime government prosecutor who became a defense attorney for Colombia's notorious Cali cartel was sentenced to five years in prison Friday for his involvement in drug trafficking. U.S. District Judge William Hoeveler sentenced William Moran, 61, a former state prosecutor who became one of Miami's most prominent criminal defense lawyers, to 60 months on a money laundering conspiracy charge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1999
Seven accused money launderers for the Cali drug cartel pleaded guilty in Los Angeles federal court as they were about to go on trial in connection with Operation Casablanca, a 2 1/2-year investigation of international drug money laundering. Five of the defendants entered their pleas Friday and two more pleaded guilty Monday on the eve of what would have been the second of four trials stemming from the massive probe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Mexico City stockbroker who says she feared she might be killed if she refused to join an international drug money-laundering network came under intense cross-examination Thursday from a federal prosecutor who portrayed her as a willing and eager conspirator. Katy Kissel Belfer, 28, was pressed to explain why she joked and laughed and gave warm hugs to two purported members of the Cali drug cartel whom she said she feared. Kissel said she was simply "over-acting."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 28-year-old stockbroker from Mexico City testified Wednesday that she was tricked into joining a scheme to launder money for the Cali drug cartel and feared she would be killed if she backed out. "When I heard they were Cali cartel, I knew I had no way out. I had to do what they said," Katy Kissel Belfer told jurors in her Los Angeles federal court trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A paid government informant testified Wednesday that U.S. Customs Service agents never inquired about his criminal past when they recruited him to become chief undercover operative in their massive probe of international drug money laundering. Fred Mendoza said he did not reveal to the agents that he had helped the Cali cartel airlift cocaine into Mexico in the early 1990s because they told him, "We already know everything about you."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government's chief informant in Operation Casablanca testified Friday that he became a money launderer for the Cali drug cartel because he made the mistake of swindling one of their members in a gems sale. On the witness stand in the trial of six Mexican nationals accused of drug money laundering, Fred Mendoza said he was selling precious stones from an office in Los Angeles' jewelry district in the late 1980s when he was visited by a customer named Lucho.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chief undercover informant in Operation Casablanca emerged from heavily protected seclusion Tuesday to testify against six Mexican nationals being tried on charges of laundering money for the Cali and Juarez drug cartels. Fred Mendoza, a Colombian-born U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid speculation about last-minute plea agreements, three of Mexico's most prominent banks are set to go on trial Thursday in Los Angeles federal court on charges of laundering millions of dollars for the Cali and Juarez drug cartels. The trial, which could have far-reaching political and economic repercussions in Mexico, is the first of four stemming from Operation Casablanca, the U.S. Customs Service's massive probe of international drug-money laundering.
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