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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2007 | Duke Helfand and Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa spoke publicly for the first time Monday about the breakup of his 20-year marriage, saying he was responsible for the split even as he refused to talk about what caused it. In a somber meeting with reporters at City Hall, Villaraigosa declined to answer questions about whether the break with his wife, Corina, was triggered by another romantic relationship.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Private space companies, such as SpaceX in Hawthorne, would get a local property tax break on launch vehicles, fuel, satellites and other gear under a bill approved overwhelmingly Thursday by the state Senate. The proposal, AB 777 by Assemblyman Al Muratsuchi (D-Torrance), would create the exemption from local property taxes for a 10-year period that would end Jan. 1, 2024. Legislation is needed to modernize the state's tax code to encourage companies such as billionaire Elon Musk's SpaceX to build their rockets and spacecraft in California, Muratsuchi said.
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SPORTS
November 27, 2006 | J.A. Adande
We're at the point where any San Diego Chargers victory can be summarized in two words. This goes back to Nov. 19, when between updates I saw a 24-7 San Diego deficit against Denver turn into a 35-27 Chargers victory and I text-messaged a friend to ask what happened. My buddy's reply: "LT happened." Flash-forward to Sunday, when the Chargers had to deal with a strong Oakland Raiders defensive effort, a shaky performance by quarterback Philip Rivers and a 14-7 Raiders lead in the fourth quarter.
SPORTS
April 10, 2014 | Eric Sondheimer
The Arcadia Invitational will be filled with terrific athletes. It has become one of the best high school sporting events in Southern California. Hurdlers must have a fearless gene in their body, and junior Torrey Atkins of Menifee Heritage High shows every indication he has one. He attacks each hurdle with a focus and determination that allow him to fly over obstacles as if they weren't in his way. "I feel I'm shooting out like a rocket," he said. Two weeks ago, he ran a personal-best time of 14.17 seconds in the 110 high hurdles at the Mt. Carmel Invitational.
AUTOS
July 12, 2006 | Jeanne Wright, Special to The Times
A new bill of rights for California car buyers provides grace periods for used-car purchases, caps dealer compensation on loans and features other provisions that are some of the strongest consumer protections in the country, according to state legislators and consumer advocates. The law, which went into effect July 1, applies to motor vehicles bought in California from a dealer for personal, family or household use.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2008 | Eric Bailey
With federal regulators canceling this year's salmon fishing season off California, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger declared a state of emergency and asked the Bush administration to aid the embattled coastal industry. The governor issued a proclamation and dispatched a letter to President Bush asking help in obtaining federal disaster assistance. Meanwhile, he signed a bill by state Sen. Patricia Wiggins (D-Santa Rosa) to fund $5.3 million in restoration projects for salmon and steelhead.
FOOD
August 12, 2010 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times restaurant critic
This is Beverly Hills?, I wondered, oh so many years ago when a friend took me to lunch in a sweet little house with a fireplace on South Beverly Drive. Chez Mimi later moved to Santa Monica, and Urth Caffé now dispenses soy lattes and iced green tea from that rose-covered cottage. Back then (and now), South Beverly Drive didn't seem fancy at all, more like a small-town Main Street where you'd find shops selling nightgowns and one-piece swimming suits, baseball cards and birthday gifts.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2008 | Nicholas Riccardi, Riccardi is a Times staff writer.
In June, leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints made a fateful decision. They called on California Mormons to donate their time and money to the campaign for Proposition 8, which would overturn a state Supreme Court ruling that permitted gay marriage. That push helped the initiative win narrow passage on election day. And it has made the Mormon Church, which for years has striven to be seen as part of the American mainstream, a political target.
SCIENCE
December 20, 2013 | By Alan Zarembo
In most discussions of suicide and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan - including the online buzz that followed publication of a Times analysis on how young California veterans die - one statistic gets repeated most: 22 veterans kill themselves each day. That number comes from a study published in early 2013 by researchers at the federal Department of Veterans Affairs. But the recent wars were not the study's primary focus. In fact, they play a minor role in veteran suicides overall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Backers of a ballot measure that would require parents to be notified before an abortion is performed on a minor acknowledged Friday that the 15-year-old on which "Sarah's Law" is based had a child and was in a common-law marriage before she died of complications from an abortion in 1994.
OPINION
April 10, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Christopher Hubbart has had a hard time trying to find a place to live, and no wonder. He's a serial rapist who assaulted women in the 1970s and '80s, was convicted and released, only to rape again. He was committed indefinitely to a mental facility until such time as he was determined by authorities to no longer be a threat. There was such a determination last summer, and it was upheld by a California court, but Hubbart waited while officials hunted for a place in Los Angeles County where he could live.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Diana Marcum, Scott Gold and Marisa Gerber
RICHGROVE, Calif. - In March 2013, a man with brooding, mahogany eyes and a walrus mustache traveled from his home in California to visit relatives in Alabama. The trip did not end well. When a business acquaintance insulted Jose Manuel Martinez's daughter, Martinez put two bullets in the man's head, officials said. It was a matter "of family honor," Errek Jett, an Alabama prosecutor, said Wednesday. But it was not, it turned out, the first time he had killed - far from it, authorities believe.
OPINION
April 9, 2014 | By Marcia Fritz
When it comes to meeting California's state pension obligations, everyone agrees that paying the bills is a challenge. But exactly how big is the "unfunded liability"? Pessimists and optimists throw out wildly different totals for the state's 80 retirement systems, making for confusion at best and stalemate at worst when it comes to honest policymaking. The truth is, pension systems have to involve assumptions. Workers and employers pay in at a certain rate, the money is invested, and if it all goes according to plan, there is enough to cover the promises made to the workers when they retire.
OPINION
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The lives of captive killer whales are nothing like those of their wild counterparts. Instead of roaming for miles every day in close-knit family groups, captive whales perform for audiences in tanks that, though roomier than those of early marine parks, are far too small for such large ocean predators. In the wild, killer whales have not been known to kill humans or one another. The same cannot be said for the whales in amusement parks around the world, even though they represent only about a tenth of a percent of the numbers in the wild.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By David Zahniser
A veteran Los Angeles building inspector sentenced last month to prison in an FBI corruption case will continue to receive a yearly pension of more than $72,000, according to a high-level retirement official. Samuel In, 66, pleaded guilty last year, admitting as part of a plea agreement that he took more than $30,000 in bribes while working as a senior inspector. He was sentenced last month to 2 1/2 years in prison after a federal prosecutor argued against leniency, mentioning his "substantial" pension.
OPINION
April 7, 2014 | By Charis E. Kubrin and Erik Nielson
For 16 months, Bay Area rapper Deandre Mitchell - better known as Laz Tha Boy - has been sitting in a jail cell faced with a decision no artist should have to make: whether to defend his innocence at trial, knowing his music likely will be used as evidence against him, or take a plea bargain and admit to crimes he maintains he did not commit. Mitchell's case dates to October 2012, when he was indicted for his alleged role in two gang-related shootings that occurred that year. Prosecutors didn't present a single arrest or conviction to establish Mitchell's association with a criminal gang, and with conflicting eyewitness testimony - and no physical evidence connecting him to the shootings, according to defense attorney John Hamasaki - prosecutors elected to introduce something else: Mitchell's violent gangsta rap videos and lyrics, which were presented to the grand jury as evidence of his criminal behavior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2002 | MIKE ANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget about what's in the secret sauce that has enticed beach bums for generations. Perhaps the most important ingredient in making a success of selling hot dogs, hamburgers and soft ice cream on the Huntington Beach boardwalk is knowing when not to try. For Jack Clapp, that time of year is nearing--the off season when the coastal fog lingers past noon, the ocean serves up a nippy breeze and the beach is so empty you could land a jumbo jet on it.
FOOD
May 27, 2010 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
To the uninitiated, the boysenberry may look like a big, blowzy, underripe blackberry, but it is in fact a noble fruit, as distinct from a common blackberry as a thoroughbred is from a mule. Large, dark purple, juicy and intense, it derives its unique flavor from its complex ancestry: sweetness and floral aroma from its raspberry grandmother, and a winy, feral tang from three native blackberry species. It's a California classic, emblematic of the joys of growing up in the Southland before it succumbed completely to sprawl.
SPORTS
April 5, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
Saturday's Santa Anita Derby is an eight-horse race, but the kind of buzz that has accompanied California Chrome, ever since he blew the field away in the March 8 San Felipe, makes it difficult for the other contenders to get any attention. California Chrome not only runs like the wind -- he has won his last three races by a total of 19 lengths -- but he and his connections present several stories that are hard to ignore. There is much talk that he would become only the fourth-ever Cal-bred to do so if he won the Kentucky Derby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
Reginald Clarke is someone Obamacare was designed to help. The 55-year-old, who was homeless for a time, now has an apartment in Gardena and a street-cleaning job that pays him $14,000 a year. He hadn't visited a doctor in four or five years. Then, last fall, his girlfriend told him he would be eligible for Medi-Cal starting Jan. 1. "I was excited. I could go get a physical," he said. "There are a few things I need. " But joy turned to exasperation when Clarke's application, filed in December, was mistakenly rejected - and then seemed to disappear from county and state computer systems.
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