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California Agriculture

NEWS
September 10, 1990 | BILL STALL and CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITERS
While confessing that "I am a city girl," Dianne Feinstein put on her western duds Sunday and stumped California's agricultural heartland, promising to be a friend of farming if elected governor but refusing to temper her strong support for Proposition 128, the sweeping environmental initiative. Feinstein and her Republican opponent, Sen. Pete Wilson, crisscrossed the San Joaquin Valley in search of the farm vote that conventional wisdom would concede to Wilson.
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FOOD
December 3, 1992 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern Californians are much closer to the farm than most of us imagine. According to a University of California study released last week, the eight-county region stretching from Santa Barbara to Brawley has twice as many agriculture-related jobs as any other area of the state. California's preeminence in agriculture has been established since the 1940s; it is first in farm revenues, well ahead of other food-producing states such as Iowa, Nebraska and Kansas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1991 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal and state agriculture and emergency officials on Wednesday toured Ventura County farms that were among the hardest hit in the state during last month's freezing temperatures. Authorities began the inspection of damaged orchards and fields in the county after an earlier stop in Tulare County to verify crop damage, a necessary step in obtaining federal disaster loans for farmers statewide.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's summit with Chinese Premier Zhu Rongji nearly ended in disaster Saturday after Zhu publicly disavowed a joint statement the White House had issued two days earlier, as well as a far-reaching series of proposed agreements for U.S. access to China's vast markets.
NEWS
July 17, 1997 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California officials boastfully tugged on their agricultural suspenders Wednesday, marking the state's 50 years as the nation's No. 1 agricultural producer by announcing another all-time record in production value. The news was so good that Gov. Pete Wilson and Secretary of Food and Agriculture Ann M. Veneman decided to spread the word themselves, releasing a new report that shows that the value of California's agriculture reached $24.5 billion in 1996.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
California's huge beef industry--the state's third-largest agricultural sector--is unlikely to benefit any time soon from the scare over "mad cow disease" in Britain. And American consumers don't appear to be worried about the malady. U.S. fast-food chains, grocers and cattle ranchers say customers are confident in their beef and are aware that the cattle disease--recently linked to a fatal illness in humans--is isolated to England.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Scientists recommended Tuesday a single aerial spraying of the pesticide malathion as part of a three-part plan to wipe out a menacing infestation of the Mediterranean fruit fly in Santa Clara County. "The panel suggested we stick with the Los Angeles County integrated pest management program, a ground spray where the adults were found, one knockdown aerial application and release of sterile Medflies each week," said Gera Curry, spokeswoman for the state Department of Food and Agriculture.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1990
The Times today inaugurates California & Co., a column about state economic issues and trends. Written by Harry Anderson, a veteran editor and writer in the Business section, it will appear Tuesdays. In today's column, Anderson says the Medfly spraying controversy shows how California agriculture lost much of its constituency in the 1980s.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1998 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California agriculture officials keep ratcheting up the tally on El Nino-related farm losses. The latest figure is $532 million, up from $218 million in mid-June. The wet, chilly spring wreaked havoc with cherries, cotton, almonds, asparagus, watermelons, wheat and tomatoes. Cool weather heightened color in the state's apple crop but delayed the harvest by about two weeks.
NEWS
February 7, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Water officials have released a report that lists reasons Central Valley farmers should want to sell irrigation water to cities. The report says that agricultural towns will not necessarily whither with their crops because more jobs would be created than lost. The study was commissioned by the Bay Area Economic Forum and was funded by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. Agriculture uses more water than manufacturing but creates fewer jobs, the report said.
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