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California Air Resources Board

BUSINESS
August 13, 2003 | From Reuters
Three big automakers and several auto dealers Tuesday confirmed that they have dropped the lawsuit that had delayed California's clean-air program, saying changes in the regulations would allow them to cut tailpipe emissions by selling a wider range of vehicles than just electric cars. General Motors Corp., DaimlerChrysler and Isuzu Motors Ltd. said that the changes would make it more practical to comply with the regulations.
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BUSINESS
March 4, 2001
For some time now, it has been the agenda of certain groups to kill the compression ignition engine, otherwise referred to as the "diesel." The recent energy fiasco has only given these people more ideas. I read "Firms' Use of Backup Diesel Generators Attracting Heat" [Feb. 4] with much concern over the lack of accurate information. The mere fact that the "beliefs" of the California Air Resources Board are included goes to show cooperation with political conspiracy. The fact is that diesel engine technology is well suited for periodic power generation.
SCIENCE
January 30, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
The California Air Resources Board thinks a little friendly competition might inspire Californians to scale back their driving, cut electricity use and take other steps to reduce carbon emissions. The agency on Thursday announced a second round of the CoolCalifornia City Challenge , where cities compete to see how much they can cut their emissions of greenhouse gases that are causing climate change. On the line is $100,000 in prize money that will go to cities based on how many people they sign up and how many points they earn in an online tracking system.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
It has been a decade in the making, but when President Bush signs the new federal Clean Air Act later this month, many in the nation's smoggiest cities will agree it was worth the wait. Cars will be cleaner. Factories will be less polluting. Cancer-causing air contaminants will be reduced. By the year 2010, every smog-bound metropolitan area in the country is supposed to be in compliance with federal clean air standards, including Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties.
OPINION
March 11, 2010
Will cutting carbon kill jobs in California? That's the premise of a November ballot initiative proposed by Republican lawmakers, whose cause got a boost this week from a report by the nonpartisan Legislative Analyst's Office that concluded the state's landmark global warming law might hurt employment. The report made headlines because it contrasts sharply with an earlier analysis by the California Air Resources Board, which concluded that the law, AB 32, would actually create 120,000 jobs by 2020.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2008 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
As many as 24,000 deaths annually in California are linked to chronic exposure to fine particulate pollution, triple the previous official estimate of 8,200, according to state researchers. The revised figures are based on a review of new research across the nation about the hazards posed by microscopic particles, which sink deep into the lungs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2005 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
Three months after his initial choice of an industry lobbyist was condemned by environmentalists and rejected by Democratic legislators, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Thursday appointed a respected air-quality scientist to chair the California Air Resources Board. The Republican governor's choice of Democrat Robert F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1994
I was disturbed by sections of a recent article and cartoon ("State Taking Wrong Road in Drive for Electric Vehicles," June 12), which inaccurately said that air emissions from power plants will negate the benefits of the commercial introduction of zero-emission electric vehicles. In California, electric vehicles are 97% less polluting than conventional gasoline-powered cars, even accounting for air emissions from power plants that generate the electricity to recharge the batteries.
MAGAZINE
July 13, 2003
General Motors wants to be viewed as supporting futuristic developments in propulsion systems and is constantly touting one research and development effort after another ("Peter Buys an Electric Car," by Peter Horton, June 8). But it does not want to be the guinea pig in actually producing radically new vehicles in quantities sufficient to break the chicken-versus-egg cycle. Unfortunately for GM, its EV1 design team came up with something immediately practical and desirable, and the limited production runs mandated by the California Air Resources Board put these prized vehicles into the hands of a significant number of avid consumers.
OPINION
May 10, 2013
Re "Tesla drives state credits to the bank," May 6 Tesla Motors is an example of an innovative, homegrown California industry. It is building ultra-clean cars and providing employment for 2,800 people in a formerly abandoned car factory. This success is not being subsidized by other car companies. Car manufacturers are not required to purchase credits (which Tesla can sell to its competitors), nor does the state's Air Resources Board establish a price. The credits are entirely an opportunity to provide additional flexibility to car manufacturers to comply with a program whose ultimate goal is to support the commercialization of cutting-edge clean technology vehicles, and ensure that we get as many of them as possible on our roads and highways as fast as possible.
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