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California Air Resources Board

OPINION
May 10, 2013
Re "Tesla drives state credits to the bank," May 6 Tesla Motors is an example of an innovative, homegrown California industry. It is building ultra-clean cars and providing employment for 2,800 people in a formerly abandoned car factory. This success is not being subsidized by other car companies. Car manufacturers are not required to purchase credits (which Tesla can sell to its competitors), nor does the state's Air Resources Board establish a price. The credits are entirely an opportunity to provide additional flexibility to car manufacturers to comply with a program whose ultimate goal is to support the commercialization of cutting-edge clean technology vehicles, and ensure that we get as many of them as possible on our roads and highways as fast as possible.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2007 | Margot Roosevelt, Times Staff Writer
The California Air Resources Board today will propose several new measures designed to cut the state's global warming emissions within the next 2 1/2 years. The proposals include retrofitting trucks, reducing pollution in computer manufacturing and requiring car owners to keep their tires properly inflated. Altogether, they would cut greenhouse gas emissions by 2.8 million metric tons a year, an early dent in the 174 million metric tons that must be slashed by the year 2020.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2013 | By Julie Cart
A federal appeals court affirmed California's right to impose low carbon fuel standards aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions, rejecting an industry argument that the regulations penalized out-of-state fuel producers. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled 2 to 1 Wednesday to reverse a lower-court ruling from 2011 that temporarily halted California's ability to enforce rules in AB 32, the state's landmark global warming law. The decision allows the California Air Resources Board to begin implementing the law and restores the state's ability to punish fuel wholesalers and refineries that sell gasoline or biofuels with carbon footprints that exceed California's guidelines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2008 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
As many as 24,000 deaths annually in California are linked to chronic exposure to fine particulate pollution, triple the previous official estimate of 8,200, according to state researchers. The revised figures are based on a review of new research across the nation about the hazards posed by microscopic particles, which sink deep into the lungs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2006 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
The California Air Resources Board voted unanimously Thursday to declare secondhand smoke a toxic air contaminant, opening the door to possible additional regulation of cigarette smokers in coming years. Banning smoking in cars with passengers, particularly children, was recommended by the lone speaker at the hearing, Paul Knepprath of the American Lung Assn. He also called for smoking bans in hotels, motels and apartment buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1996
The state Senate on Thursday confirmed the appointment of Orange County Supervisor Jim Silva to the California Air Resources Board, despite criticism that he is antienvironment. Silva won the Senate's blessing on a 26-4 vote after Senate Leader Bill Lockyer (D-Hayward) blasted the supervisor as someone who puts the interests of business ahead of health and environmental concerns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1989
A disservice will be done to the public if the 2O-year air quality improvement plan proposed by the South Coast Air Quality Management District is approved by the California Air Resources Board at its hearing on Aug. 15. No one disagrees with the goal to clean our air, including our members in business, labor and government who live and work in Southern California along with their families and friends. But the AQMD plan will prove too controversial to work over the long haul. It is an unrealistic, pie-in-the-sky scheme which is technologically, economically, socially and politically impossible to achieve, despite its best theoretical intentions.
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
A coalition of environmental groups filed suit Thursday against the California Air Resources Board, charging that the agency approved an illegal plan that fails to take strong measures to clean up the air in the Los Angeles Basin.
NEWS
December 12, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
After a lengthy suspension, the California Air Resources Board voted Thursday to reinstitute spot highway inspections of diesel-powered, heavy-duty trucks and buses. The law applies to vehicles weighing over 7,000 pounds. Unlike gasoline-fueled passenger cars and light trucks that face routine smog checks, diesel trucks and buses have not had to undergo regular inspections since 1993, although they produce a disproportionate amount of smog.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
A group of California scientists Wednesday urged state lawmakers to adopt a steeper target for cutting greenhouse gas emissions after 2020. "California's leadership is needed now more than ever to address the risks of a dangerously warming climate," the Union of Concerned Scientists said in a letter signed by more than 100 scientists, researchers and economists and sent to Gov. Jerry Brown and state legislators. The state is on track to meet its obligation to cut carbon dioxide and other heat-trapping gases to 1990 levels by 2020, according to the California Air Resources Board.
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