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NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Melanie Mason
Americans Elect -- a nonprofit organization aiming to create an alternative, independent presidential ticket -- announced today it has qualified for ballot access in California, marking a significant milestone in its quest to be a factor in the 2012 race. California is the 12th state in which the group has earned a spot on the ballot, and it was the heaviest lift thus far for the nascent group. The effort to get on the state's ballot started last March and employed more than 1,500 people to collect more than 1.6 million signatures, the Tribune Washington Bureau reported in July "Ballot access in California is a major milestone in achieving ballot access in all 50 states," said Kellen Arno, the group's director of ballot access, in a statement.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 26, 2014 | Patt Morrison
Ron Unz knows his way around the California ballot. He ran for governor against Pete Wilson in the GOP primary 20 years ago. He lost big, but four years later he won with his Proposition 227, which altered California schools by effectively ending bilingual education and mainstreaming Spanish-speaking students. The sometimes conservative, sometimes libertarian Republican entrepreneur-turned-activist is going back to the ballot, collecting signatures for an initiative to raise the state's minimum wage to $12. It may seem counterintuitive but Unz contends it's an idea that's as conservative as they come.
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BUSINESS
August 22, 2012
Top 5 total contributions to California ballot measures for November 2012 No on Proposition 37 — Labeling food with genetically engineered ingredients: $25 million (Yes: $3 million) Yes on Proposition 39 — Changes corporate tax calculations to fund clean energy: $22.3 million (No: $0) Yes on Proposition 30 — Governor's proposed income and sales tax increase: $20 million (No: $479,000) Yes on Proposition 38 — Raises income taxes to fund education: $18.8 million (No: $0)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2013 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO - While much of the country is gearing up for the holidays, political forces in Sacramento are girding for battle. Already, special interests are lined up with plans that could shape next year's general election ballot. They are considering propositions to increase medical malpractice awards, hike tobacco taxes and give local governments the right to scale back public employee pensions, among other ideas. Each of the proposals could spawn campaigns costing tens of millions of dollars.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
We may finally have discovered a remedy for corporate executives with more greed than brains: Let them invest corporate funds by the millions in California ballot initiatives, then vote the things down. Isn't that the lesson of Tuesday's balloting on Propositions 16 and 17, those majestically cynical initiatives sponsored by Pacific Gas & Electric Co. and Mercury Insurance Group? To recap for the 82% of eligible voters statewide who didn't bother to vote last week, Proposition 16 was an initiative concocted by PG&E, the state's biggest private utility, to hamstring the public power agencies that are its chief competitors — pretty much its only competitors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2012 | By Michael J. Mishak, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO — A labor union that pushed a pair of ballot measures that would have reined in excessive hospital billing and expanded healthcare for the poor has dropped them — in exchange for an agreement that enlists the hospital industry in the union's organizing efforts. The agreement, announced late Wednesday, ends a months-long public battle between the Service Employees International Union and the California Hospital Assn. Private hospitals had accused the union of using the initiative process as leverage in contract negotiations to expand its membership, a charge the union strongly denied.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | MORT SAHL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES and Mort Sahl, a political satirist, lives and performs in Los Angeles.
V olumes have been written for and about California's upcoming elections. This is humorist and political satirist Mort Sahl's special take on the Golden State's democratic processes. In an era in which television journalists contend "government no longer works" and some citizens don't vote because they feel powerless, California sets a marvelous example by printing a 142-page book setting forth the ballot propositions in excruciating detail and distributing them to each new arrival.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1995 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort that parallels the tort-reform movement in Congress, a group led by Silicon Valley entrepreneurs Thursday said it has filed a California ballot initiative with a "loser pays" provision to discourage what it calls frivolous shareholder lawsuits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2012 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - An $11-million donation to a California campaign fund could become a test of whether secret political donors can be forced to reveal themselves. Seizing on a new state regulation, activists have asked authorities to unmask those behind the large donation, made this week by an Arizona nonprofit to a conservative group campaigning on two California ballot measures. Implemented in May, the regulation requires that campaign donors moving money through such nonprofits be identified.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2012 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - California's campaign finance watchdog sued an Arizona nonprofit group Thursday, escalating the battle over a controversial $11-million political donation. The Fair Political Practices Commission is seeking records, ranging from financial statements to text messages, as part of an effort to unmask the nonprofit's donors, who have been accused by activists of improperly hiding their identities. A California regulation says nonprofits cannot conceal a donor's identity if the contribution was intended for a state campaign.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Thanks to the tenacity of the Fair Political Practices Commission, the names are now dribbling out of the campaign donors who secretly supported an anti-union measure and opposed a desperately needed tax increase on last year's California ballot. As one might expect, it's a disgraceful roster of billionaires intent on pulling up the ladder of advancement behind them. Charles Schwab. Eli Broad. B. Wayne Hughes (founder of Public Storage). The owners of the Gap. Sheldon Adelson of the Las Vegas Sands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
For Barbara Coe, everything changed the day she accompanied an elderly friend to an Orange County social services center in 1991. "I walked into this monstrous room full of people, babies and little children all over the place, and I realized nobody was speaking English," the South Dakota native later told the Washington Post. "I was overwhelmed with this feeling: 'Where am I? What's happened here?'" When she learned from a welfare counselor that immigrants who had entered the country illegally qualified for the same public benefits that had been denied her friend, a U.S. citizen, Coe began her journey from political neophyte to fiery crusader against the demographic tide that was transforming California.
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By David G. Savage and Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court justices sounded closely split on gay marriage Tuesday, but Justice Anthony M. Kennedy suggested the court should strike down California's ban on same-sex marriage without ruling broadly on the issue. Twice during the oral argument, Kennedy questioned why the court had voted to hear the California case.  “I wonder if this case was properly granted,” Kennedy said at one point. His comments suggested that the court's four most conservative justices voted to hear the California case.
OPINION
December 9, 2012 | By Daniel Zingale
Big Soda spent big bucks. That's how it defeated ballot measures to create soda taxes in two California towns. In Richmond, in the Bay Area, and in El Monte, east of Los Angeles, the measures would have added a penny-an-ounce tax on soda. Had the taxes passed, they were projected to raise millions of dollars aimed at funding local recreation and nutrition activities to fight childhood obesity. To bury these towns in an avalanche of billboards, mailers and ads, the American Beverage Assn.
NEWS
November 5, 2012 | By Karin Klein
The tax-exempt, nonprofit environmental group would never tell you to vote for President Obama and other Democratic candidates -- but only because it can't. So instead it sent out word that voters should cast their ballots with the need to combat global warming in mind. And those ballots would be for whom, exactly? There haven't been loads of GOP candidates calling for the support of clean energy such as solar and wind power, which contribute far less to climate change. The parent group didn't say vote for Proposition 30 or Proposition 38, two initiatives on the California ballot that would raise taxes for public schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - It's time to stop vacillating. Election day is almost here. There are still a few loose ends to straighten out on the California ballot. Things such as auto insurance, sex slavery and food labeling. Also an obscure legislative redistricting measure. Here are some thoughts - mostly negative - on four measures, in numerical order: •Proposition 33: It's sponsored by one very narrow interest. Mercury Insurance founder George Joseph is bankrolling this initiative - with $16.4 million at last count - in an effort to steal customers from other insurers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2012 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - California's campaign finance watchdog sued an Arizona nonprofit group Thursday, escalating the battle over a controversial $11-million political donation. The Fair Political Practices Commission is seeking records, ranging from financial statements to text messages, as part of an effort to unmask the nonprofit's donors, who have been accused by activists of improperly hiding their identities. A California regulation says nonprofits cannot conceal a donor's identity if the contribution was intended for a state campaign.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | By Dan Turner
A fascinating dichotomy has emerged between the two criminal justice initiatives on the Nov. 6 California ballot. Both are aimed at reducing harsh sentences and thus saving the state money, yet one has attracted support from conservatives and is expected to win handily, while the other is opposed widely by conservatives and trailing in the polls. Why? Proposition 36, which would tweak the state's three-strikes sentencing law by making it less likely that third-strikers who commit minor crimes end up with life terms, has been endorsed by Republican law-and-order types such as L.A. County Dist.
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