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California Budget

OPINION
February 12, 2012
There are almost always good reasons not to cut programs from the state budget. Those programs or services wouldn't have been funded in the first place if at least some people hadn't found reason to like them. But cut California must, despite protests from interest groups that this or that beloved budget item must be preserved in full. That's why a proposal by Assemblyman Jared Huffman (D-San Rafael) is so appealing. Instead of demanding restoration of funds, Huffman proposes a more constructive response to the closure of up to 70 state parks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2012 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- Public school funds will probably be cut this year even if voters approve Gov. Jerry Brown's proposed tax hikes in November, the state's top budget advisor said Wednesday. That analysis undercuts a central premise of Brown's new budget plan: that his tax hikes would save schools from billions of dollars in reductions. Districts are likely to trim spending anyway, said Legislative Analyst Mac Taylor, rather than wait for voters to decide in November. "Districts have to plan for the worst case," said Taylor, whom lawmakers look to for nonpartisan financial advice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2011 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
Its buildings have survived droughts and earthquakes. But now Los Encinos State Historic Park faces another kind of hardship: state budget cuts. The San Fernando Valley park is among 70 state parks facing closure because California needs to save money. But local residents won't give up the cherished refuge without a fight. "Generations of people have come to this park. It's such a waste to close it," said Kathy Moghimi-Patterson, an Encino Neighborhood Council board member who is leading the campaign to save Los Encinos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2011 | By Anthony York and Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento and Los Angeles -- Gov. Jerry Brown announced nearly $1 billion in new state budget cuts, slashing spending on higher education and eliminating funding for free school-bus service but avoiding the deeper reductions to public schools that many had feared. Services for the disabled, money for public libraries and funding for state prisons will also be pared. Most of the cuts, announced Tuesday, will take effect Jan. 1. The reductions were built into the budget that Brown and lawmakers approved in June, set to kick in if revenue did not reach the optimistic level they had assumed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2011 | By Shane Goldmacher, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- California's precariously balanced state budget, already teetering in the continuing economic upheaval, came under further siege Tuesday as two groups announced lawsuits challenging the spending plan. School officials, including those at the L.A. Unified School District, said they would file suit Wednesday alleging that Gov. Jerry Brown and state legislators illegally manipulated California's voter-approved education funding formula to shortchange them by $2 billion.
OPINION
June 30, 2011
To drive the 405 Re "Plan to shut 405 alarms hospital leaders," June 25, and "Gearing up for a lost weekend," June 29 The temporary closure of the 405 Freeway in a little more than two weeks is causing so much anxiety. I remember a similar fear in 1984, when the Olympics were held in Los Angeles and panic for every driver set in long before the event began. The worry was for nothing, as the incredible Peter Ueberroth worked with the city and found ways to keep Los Angeles running so smoothly that you wished it was that way every day. To everyone's relief, the city didn't fall apart.
OPINION
June 29, 2011
The state budget crafted by Gov. Jerry Brown and top Democratic lawmakers is the first in the wake of Proposition 25, and it fulfills both the fears of the measure's detractors and the hopes of its supporters. It was drawn up entirely by the Legislature's Democratic majority, which gave up trying to strike a deal with Republicans that would have included a raft of governmental reforms. On the other hand, it arrived for all intents and purposes on time, about two weeks after the statutory deadline but before the start of the new fiscal year July 1. California was thus spared, for the first time in years, the melodrama and confusion of another protracted budget stalemate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2011 | By Shane Goldmacher, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- The Legislature passed an austerity budget Tuesday night that would cut from universities, courts and the poor, shutter 70 parks and threaten schools but would not — by officials' own admission — restore California's long-term financial health. The UC and Cal State systems would face about a 23% funding cut, among the steepest in the proposal. Cash grants for the needy would fall, a program to help thousands of teen mothers get an education would be suspended and hundreds of millions of dollars would be siphoned from mental health programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2011 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
An honest state budget still eludes Gov. Jerry Brown, but he has acquired one priceless commodity: a reputation for consistency. Conviction and commitment. Says what he means, means what he says. That's an invaluable asset for a political leader. It tends to make him believable, credible, respected. It also can be a drag on leadership. It may render him inflexible, immobile, even stubborn. How, for example, can we praise Brown for following his conviction and vetoing a gimmicky budget while condemning Republicans for adhering to their pledge not to renew tax hikes?
OPINION
June 18, 2011 | Tim Rutten
In April 1519, Hernan Cortes landed near what's now Veracruz, Mexico, and scuttled his ships so that his potentially mutinous troops would have no choice but to follow him into battle against the Aztecs. Gov. Jerry Brown's veto Thursday of a budget passed by his own party's legislative majority has something of the conquistador's either-or bravado. Brown has taken California politics into new territory with the first categorical budget veto since 1922, when the state began requiring a consolidated annual spending plan.
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