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BUSINESS
July 21, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Professional athletes from out-of-state teams soon could be out of luck if they seek money through the workers' compensation system for injuries suffered at California sporting venues. A bill to scale back the lucrative benefits that California has awarded the athletes in recent years is moving swiftly through the Legislature and is likely to be on Gov. Jerry Brown's desk next month. Supporters said they expect Brown to sign it into law. Backed by football, baseball, basketball, hockey and soccer team owners, the legislation would close what they call a loophole that allows athletes, who sometimes played only a few games in California, to win six-figure payouts for so-called cumulative trauma injuries.
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BUSINESS
November 10, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - After working at the top levels of state government in three administrations, Marty Morgenstern is calling it quits - again. This time, California's outgoing Labor and Workforce Development secretary is stepping down as head of the agency that oversees unemployment insurance, workers' compensation and on-the-job safety. At age 78, he has worked on and off for Gov. Jerry Brown, himself 75 years old. Morgenstern, who will remain an unpaid senior advisor to the governor, distilled his theory of government work to just three sentences: "We never have enough money.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - A rescue effort is underway for the state's financially troubled unemployment insurance program, an economic lifeline that currently provides weekly monetary support for 525,000 jobless Californians. More than $10 billion in the red, the unemployment insurance fund has been spiraling toward bankruptcy in recent years, even as it continues to provide weekly jobless benefits of as much as $450 for job seekers. Video chat: Sequester to hit jobless benefits Unemployment, as it's best known, is a primary element of the state's economic safety net. Funded by employer taxes, it's been providing jobless benefits since 1935.
OPINION
April 16, 2010
They've had enough Re "Arizona passes strict border rule," April 14 The recent killing of prominent rancher Robert Krentz by an illegal alien blew the lid off a boiling caldron of illegal activity that is killing Arizonans and bankrupting the state. Illegal aliens are ruining Arizona's educational system and overburdening jails, hospitals, emergency rooms and indigent social services -- which are supposed to be for Arizona citizens only. Mexican President Felipe Calderon pays lip-service to our politicians while enjoying billions annually flowing into Mexico from illegal workers and drug cartels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2007 | George Skelton
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger recently vetoed a dozen bills that the California Chamber of Commerce alleged were anti-business "job-killers." In the chamber's view, the governor's action will create jobs. Fine. How is this deficit-plagued state going to pay for the jobs? Yes, of course, they're private-enterprise jobs, not government. But who's going to pay for the roads and transit to get these people to work? To educate their kids? To provide police protection?
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | By Jon Healey
California Secretary of State Debra Bowen is resisting a push by activists and journalists for better disclosure of campaign finance data, arguing in essence that it would cost too much to comply. It's a surprising stance from Bowen, whose office has fought to make more information about donors available to California voters. It also strains credulity. At issue is a request by MapLight California, California Common Cause and 10 others, including this newspaper, for a downloadable version of the campaign finance data that the secretary of state collects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2009 | Shane Goldmacher
Beyond the mind-numbing numbers, the partisan bickering and the all-night legislative sessions was a web of forces that helped shape the state budget package Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is expected to sign today. Some scenes from behind the scenes: Whatever you call it, it worked Schwarzenegger has long attacked lawmakers for fundraising during budget season, but that didn't stop him from slipping away to the headquarters of the state's big-business lobby earlier this month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - "There's no place to go but up," asserted Jim Brulte, whose mission is to save the California Republican Party. "We're on the way back. " Brulte told me that in 2000 at the Republican National Convention in Philadelphia. He was the state Senate minority leader then. And was he ever wrong! The California GOP did make a brief resurgence under Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who was never fully accepted or appreciated by party activists. But in recent years, it has been going down, down, down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | By Chris Megerian and Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - The Assembly passed a proposal Thursday to hike California's minimum wage from $8 to $9.25 an hour over the next three years and require future increases to keep pace with inflation. Higher wages would "allow our families to provide for their children, pay their bills and give them dignity and respect," said Assemblyman Luis Alejo (D-Watsonville), the bill's author. The measure, which now goes to the Senate, was one of scores that lawmakers advanced as they raced to meet an internal deadline to keep legislation moving.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2013 | Marc Lifsher
Hundreds of items found on supermarket shelves, such as shampoos, cleaning supplies, cosmetics and food packaging, could get chemical makeovers under new rules being put in force by California. On Thursday, state toxic chemical regulators will unveil what they say is the nation's most comprehensive program for identifying and reformulating common consumer products containing hazardous chemicals. In the past, the state took a piecemeal approach. Lawmakers would ban specific chemicals from particular products, such as bisphenol A in baby bottles and sippy cups.
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