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California Child Care Resource And Referral Network

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NEWS
February 13, 1997 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Child care for the working poor in California can cost up to 90% of a parent's minimum-wage income and the system is unable to meet much of the state's need--particularly for care of infants, according to a study released Wednesday. The study, described as the first comprehensive look at the state's child care system, offers a disturbing and challenging picture for state officials who consider this issue to be the backbone of a successful welfare reform plan.
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NEWS
February 25, 1998 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outside, morning birds twitter around Rob Reiner's tidy, white Brentwood compound. The household staff is quietly occupied, and the filmmaker's wife, Michele, is breast-feeding their month-old daughter on an elegant, white, slipcovered chair. "Last year, we made a joke that I was getting pregnant to put into practice everything we've learned over the last couple of years," she laughs. "And the fact is, it's true."
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NEWS
May 16, 1991 | ROBIN ABCARIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Finding child care is a daunting proposition, especially for first-timers. In Los Angeles County, the starting point for thousands of parents is their local resource and referral agency. The county is divided into 10 geographic areas, each served by a nonprofit agency--listed in the phone book under "child care"--that is a member of the state-funded California Child Care Resource and Referral Network. (Orange and Ventura counties have one agency each.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Child care for the working poor in California can cost up to 90% of a parent's minimum-wage income and the system is unable to meet much of the state's need--particularly for care of infants, according to a study released Wednesday. The study, described as the first comprehensive look at the state's child care system, offers a disturbing and challenging picture for state officials who consider this issue to be the backbone of a successful welfare reform plan.
NEWS
February 25, 1998 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outside, morning birds twitter around Rob Reiner's tidy, white Brentwood compound. The household staff is quietly occupied, and the filmmaker's wife, Michele, is breast-feeding their month-old daughter on an elegant, white, slipcovered chair. "Last year, we made a joke that I was getting pregnant to put into practice everything we've learned over the last couple of years," she laughs. "And the fact is, it's true."
BUSINESS
March 9, 1992
California Fair Employment and Housing Commission: For questions about family leave laws and other employment and housing issues: Los Angeles County: (213) 897-2839. Orange County: (714) 558-4159. San Diego County: (619) 237-7405. San Bernardino County: (714) 383-4711. Ventura County: (805) 654-4513. Family-Related Organizations: Andrus Older Adult Center, USC School of Gerontology, (213) 740-3493. Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center, (213) 740-8711.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1988 | BARBARA BAIRD
These are some of the resources youth organizations can draw upon for help in detecting child sexual abuse and screening possible molesters from among volunteers. State Department of Justice: Checks volunteers' fingerprints, provides nonprofit youth organizations with records of convictions on sex-related and violent crimes. Also will provide speakers for youth organizations. Contact Department of Justice, 4949 Broadway, Sacramento, Calif. 95820.
NEWS
January 10, 1996
The California Child Care Resource and Referral Network surveyed costs of day care in 1995. The figures given are weekly rates for full-time care (35 hours a week or more) or part-time care. Family day care, in which providers care for children in their homes. Large family homes are licensed for a maximum of 12 children and two adults must be present. Small family homes are licensed for six children and require one adult. The mean cost for full-time infant care in Orange County was $130 a week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1999
Maybe there's a cloud behind every silver lining. The economic good times that continue to roll nationally and the large number of former welfare recipients returning to work have brought on an unprecedented shortage of child care in California, according to a state-funded study released this week. The shortages are especially dire in Los Angeles County, where the parents of 1 million children needing daylong or after-school care are chasing 186,000 licensed slots.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2001 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's licensed child-care industry pumps tens of billions of dollars into the state's economy, but the industry is strained and badly in need of support from both the private and public sectors, according to a report being released today. The study, commissioned by the nonprofit National Economic Development and Law Center, analyzed the economic power of an industry normally viewed in social and educational terms. It found that the industry generates more than $4.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | ROBIN ABCARIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Finding child care is a daunting proposition, especially for first-timers. In Los Angeles County, the starting point for thousands of parents is their local resource and referral agency. The county is divided into 10 geographic areas, each served by a nonprofit agency--listed in the phone book under "child care"--that is a member of the state-funded California Child Care Resource and Referral Network. (Orange and Ventura counties have one agency each.
NEWS
August 15, 1999 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it comes to his 3-year-old child's safety at day care, Joseph Molina probably has the right idea--he's worried about the day-to-day, not the one-in-a-million. "I think people need to keep perspective when they look at [last week's shootings at the North Valley Jewish Community Center]," said Molina, head of a public relations firm in Woodland Hills. "I think people should be more concerned about driving to and from day care. I worry more about my kids crossing the street."
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