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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001 | DARYL KELLEY and DANIEL YI and HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California cities are among the most crowded in the nation, as high housing prices and a chronic apartment shortage have forced families to double up and homeowners to rent bedrooms and garages. Crowding detailed in the latest U.S. census can be seen especially in largely Latino cities that have become major ports of entry for poor immigrants seeking a better life.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1987 | STEPHANIE O'NEILL, Times Staff Writer
More than two dozen local government leaders took their battle for the "home rule" power of cities to the state capital last week in an attempt to preserve local bans on the sale of alcohol and gasoline at the same places. And although the local officials won some minor concessions, Glendale Mayor Ginger Bremberg said her city, and more than 30 other California cities that have imposed similar bans, will most likely lose the fight. A measure by Assemblyman Gary A.
NEWS
April 30, 1987 | STEPHANIE O'NEILL, Times Staff Writer
Glendale Mayor Ginger Bremberg took her battle for the "home rule" power of cities to the state capital last week in an attempt to preserve Glendale's year-old ban on the sale of alcohol and gasoline at the same places. And although she won some minor concessions, Bremberg said Glendale--and more than 30 other California cities that have imposed similar bans--will most likely lose the fight. A measure by Assemblyman Gary A.
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
Monday morning, Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer and Police Chief Charlie Beck will announce an effort to help property owners and real estate agents comply with Proposition D, which banned all but about 100 medical marijuana dispensaries that opened before 2007. Proposition D was essentially a compromise between medical marijuana advocates and City Hall to impose some regulation on pot shops in the city after previous attempts to control the industry were blocked in court. L.A.'s convoluted attempts to control medical marijuana are by no means unique.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2013 | By Alejandro Lazo
A leading measure of home prices in the biggest American cities posted strong year-over-year growth in November. The S&P/Case Shiller 20-city index rose 5.5% from the same month a year earlier, rising in 19 out of the 20 metro areas tracked by the gauge. According to the index, from October to November, prices declined 0.1% -- a normal seasonal slowdown. The data are the latest indication that home prices continued to rise through the end of last year as housing inventory dwindled and demand surged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2012 | Christine Mai-Duc
The Stanton that Alma Barba remembers was just a wedge of a place in the middle of a growing county. There were the strawberry fields and orange groves she'd pass on the way to school, and the town's well-rooted reputation as being impoverished and gang-ridden that she learned to endure. "It was Mayberry-small, but it was horrible," agrees Dave Shawver, who's lived here more than 40 years and has spent the last 24 on the City Council. Today, the gangs are mostly gone. But the poverty is real: The Orange County city is running out of money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2000 | HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After retiring from his post as police chief in Long Beach, Bill Ellis entered the world of temp workers. No, he's not in the typing pool. Ellis became temporary police chief of West Covina for several months in 1998 and then worked a similar stint last spring in Manhattan Beach. More temporary positions may be ahead for him, all arranged through an unusual agency that helps California cities and counties fill high-end, but short-term, vacancies with retired government executives.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Dan Turner
California's bullet train is appropriately named -- not because it will ever be as fast as a speeding bullet but because it has taken more potshots than a Montana stop sign . Critics deride the line as a train to nowhere that will never attract the funding needed to run all the way from Sacramento to San Diego (with a spur to San Francisco) as originally envisioned. What's more, they say, the train's planning has been so undermined by special interests that it has no chance of running fast enough to fulfill its promise to get from L.A. to San Francisco in 2 1/2 hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1997
Laurann Cook is the mayor pro tem of Fountain Valley and current president of the Orange County chapter of the League of California Cities. In other words, she is a staunch supporter and propagandist for Orange County cities (Orange County Voices, Sept. 21). Cook says hundreds of millions of dollars in city revenues have been shifted to the state in recent years. And she's basically right. But what she conveniently fails to mention is why the state took the money. The fact is that most of the money shifted from the cities to the state ended up coming back to the same community from whence it came.
NEWS
May 12, 2002
Re "Thinking Outside Big-Box Zoning," April 29 Your article about the regional implications of city governments that use zoning powers to improve sales tax income touched the edges of the fiscal dilemma faced by California communities but did not address the underlying causes. All cities must have a general plan that balances residential, retail, manufacturing, office, recreation, schools and public uses. The plan reflects geographic and economic factors and community input. The point is, development is done with considerable forethought.
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