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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1989
Californians don't need to be fed statistics to have a sense of how rapidly the state is growing. They see signs of it in their own micro worlds each day--traffic snarls, sprouting developments, jammed theater lines, schools on double session and so on. But California's macro world of population figures is always startling. The 1988 estimated city population figures just released by the Census Bureau provides some eye-openers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1995 | BERT ELJERA
The City Council has decided to rejoin the League of California Cities because of the bankruptcy that recently hit Orange County. "We need to get involved, be at the table, so to speak," said Councilman Mark Leyes on Tuesday, moments before the council voted 3 to 2 to rejoin the league after dropping out last year. Garden Grove was one of only two California cities that were not members of the league. But with the county's bankruptcy filing Dec.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
Warren Buffett may have doubts about municipal bonds, those boring tax-exempt investments that governments need to finance their operations and projects. The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday that the famed investor's Berkshire Hathaway Inc. recently wound down a large bet on muni bonds. The decision to end credit-default swaps insuring $8.25 billion in bonds is seen as a sign "that one of the world's savviest investors has doubts about the state of municipal finances," the Journal reported.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Dan Turner
California's bullet train is appropriately named -- not because it will ever be as fast as a speeding bullet but because it has taken more potshots than a Montana stop sign . Critics deride the line as a train to nowhere that will never attract the funding needed to run all the way from Sacramento to San Diego (with a spur to San Francisco) as originally envisioned. What's more, they say, the train's planning has been so undermined by special interests that it has no chance of running fast enough to fulfill its promise to get from L.A. to San Francisco in 2 1/2 hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2012 | By David Zahniser and Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles became the largest city in the nation to approve a ban on plastic bags at supermarket checkout lines, handing a hard-fought victory to environmentalists and promising to change the way Angelenos do their grocery shopping. The City Council voted 13 to 1 to phase out plastic bags over the next 16 months at an estimated 7,500 stores, meaning shoppers will need to bring reusable bags or purchase paper bags for 10 cents each. The ban came after years of campaigning by clean-water advocates who said it would reduce the amount of trash in landfills, the region's waterways and the ocean.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Corporations, unions, local governments and other interests spent $137 million to influence legislation and regulation at the California Legislature and state agencies in the first half of this year. Professional trade and general business groups paid about $6 million to lobby, followed closely by labor unions with $5.7 million. The healthcare industry spent $4.2 million, local governments $2.1 million and trial attorneys and utilities accounted for $700,000 each.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1987 | STEPHANIE O'NEILL, Times Staff Writer
More than two dozen local government leaders took their battle for the "home rule" power of cities to the state capital last week in an attempt to preserve local bans on the sale of alcohol and gasoline at the same places. And although the local officials won some minor concessions, Glendale Mayor Ginger Bremberg said her city, and more than 30 other California cities that have imposed similar bans, will most likely lose the fight. A measure by Assemblyman Gary A.
NEWS
April 30, 1987 | STEPHANIE O'NEILL, Times Staff Writer
Glendale Mayor Ginger Bremberg took her battle for the "home rule" power of cities to the state capital last week in an attempt to preserve Glendale's year-old ban on the sale of alcohol and gasoline at the same places. And although she won some minor concessions, Bremberg said Glendale--and more than 30 other California cities that have imposed similar bans--will most likely lose the fight. A measure by Assemblyman Gary A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001 | DARYL KELLEY and DANIEL YI and HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California cities are among the most crowded in the nation, as high housing prices and a chronic apartment shortage have forced families to double up and homeowners to rent bedrooms and garages. Crowding detailed in the latest U.S. census can be seen especially in largely Latino cities that have become major ports of entry for poor immigrants seeking a better life.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2013 | By Alejandro Lazo
A leading measure of home prices in the biggest American cities posted strong year-over-year growth in November. The S&P/Case Shiller 20-city index rose 5.5% from the same month a year earlier, rising in 19 out of the 20 metro areas tracked by the gauge. According to the index, from October to November, prices declined 0.1% -- a normal seasonal slowdown. The data are the latest indication that home prices continued to rise through the end of last year as housing inventory dwindled and demand surged.
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