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BUSINESS
August 21, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
Warren Buffett may have doubts about municipal bonds, those boring tax-exempt investments that governments need to finance their operations and projects. The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday that the famed investor's Berkshire Hathaway Inc. recently wound down a large bet on muni bonds. The decision to end credit-default swaps insuring $8.25 billion in bonds is seen as a sign "that one of the world's savviest investors has doubts about the state of municipal finances," the Journal reported.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2010 | Abby Sewell and Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The average pay of a city manager in Los Angeles County is about $209,000 -- far less than the compensation received by former Bell Chief Administrative Officer Robert Rizzo, according to a Times analysis of compensation data. The total taxable compensation cities reported paying their administrators in 2009 -- including base salary and other routine, taxable components such as bonuses; housing, car and cellphone allowances; and cashed-out sick leave and vacation time -- ranged from $106,600 in tiny Bradbury to about $315,000 in Santa Monica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2013 | By Wesley Lowery, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles City Councilman Paul Krekorian wants the city to explore the feasibility of banning the possession of ammunition for high-capacity gun magazines, the first step toward instituting stricter city gun and ammunition laws. Although the California penal code now prohibits the manufacture and sale of magazines that hold more than 10 bullets, Krekorian said in a council motion Tuesday that a ban on the possession of the magazines within city limits could further improve public safety.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Dan Turner
California's bullet train is appropriately named -- not because it will ever be as fast as a speeding bullet but because it has taken more potshots than a Montana stop sign . Critics deride the line as a train to nowhere that will never attract the funding needed to run all the way from Sacramento to San Diego (with a spur to San Francisco) as originally envisioned. What's more, they say, the train's planning has been so undermined by special interests that it has no chance of running fast enough to fulfill its promise to get from L.A. to San Francisco in 2 1/2 hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2012 | By David Zahniser and Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles became the largest city in the nation to approve a ban on plastic bags at supermarket checkout lines, handing a hard-fought victory to environmentalists and promising to change the way Angelenos do their grocery shopping. The City Council voted 13 to 1 to phase out plastic bags over the next 16 months at an estimated 7,500 stores, meaning shoppers will need to bring reusable bags or purchase paper bags for 10 cents each. The ban came after years of campaigning by clean-water advocates who said it would reduce the amount of trash in landfills, the region's waterways and the ocean.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
Thousands of Los Angeles homeowners covered by State Farm General Insurance Co. will see their annual premiums drop an average of $102, or 12.3%, beginning April 15. The reduction is part of a statewide markdown that will benefit 85% of State Farm's 1.6 million homeowner customers in California, the company said. The lower prices are expected to be announced at a 10:30 a.m. news conference in Los Angeles held by state Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones and State Farm Chief Executive Tom Conley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
If Los Angeles ever wants to join the ranks of Las Vegas or Miami in attracting tourists who want to party, it needs to free its night spots from having to make the last call for alcohol by 2 a.m., according to one state lawmaker. State Sen. Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) has introduced legislation that would allow California cities to seek permission from the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to allow their nightclubs, restauraunts and bars to sell drinks until 4 a.m. "Many cities in California have dynamic social activities that are vital to their economies, but they lack the flexibility to expand their businesses,” Leno said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- Public records laws would be weakened under the budget deal scheduled for a vote in the Legislature on Friday. Administration officials say the change could help the state avoid tens of millions of dollars needed reimburse local governments and agencies for complying with the laws. But advocates are concerned that easing requirements will make it tougher for the media and the public to access records. “Agencies have not demonstrated a tremendous willingness to provide information, especially on their own," said Jim Ewert, general counsel for the California Newspaper Publishers Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1987 | STEPHANIE O'NEILL, Times Staff Writer
More than two dozen local government leaders took their battle for the "home rule" power of cities to the state capital last week in an attempt to preserve local bans on the sale of alcohol and gasoline at the same places. And although the local officials won some minor concessions, Glendale Mayor Ginger Bremberg said her city, and more than 30 other California cities that have imposed similar bans, will most likely lose the fight. A measure by Assemblyman Gary A.
NEWS
April 30, 1987 | STEPHANIE O'NEILL, Times Staff Writer
Glendale Mayor Ginger Bremberg took her battle for the "home rule" power of cities to the state capital last week in an attempt to preserve Glendale's year-old ban on the sale of alcohol and gasoline at the same places. And although she won some minor concessions, Bremberg said Glendale--and more than 30 other California cities that have imposed similar bans--will most likely lose the fight. A measure by Assemblyman Gary A.
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