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California Commentary

OPINION
March 12, 1995 | RON K. UNZ, Ron K. Unz is a Silicon Valley entrepreneur who was a leading Republican opponent of Proposition 187.
California, the leader in national trends, is approaching another crossroads: We can confront the challenges of our ethnic diversity either through the means symbolized by last November's Proposition 187 or by those of the proposed civil rights ballot initiative. Although it began as a measure eliminating government benefits for illegal immigrants, by the end of its bitter, divisive campaign, Proposition 187 had become a symbolic battle for ethnic dominance between Anglos and Latinos.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1995 | CLIFFORD M. TONG, Clifford M. Tong is CEO of the Small Business Connection, a Lafayette, Calif ., management and technical consulting firm.
The winds of political change are shifting and the smell is distinctly malodorous. "Political correctness" itself is now politically incorrect. Take affirmative action as a prime example. Gov. Pete Wilson and the new state Legislature seem intent on wiping out affirmative action, minority and women business enterprise programs and any other programs that they deem to be examples of "reverse discrimination."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1995 | RICHARD ALARCON, Richard Alarcon represents the northeast San Fernando Valley on the Los Angeles City Council.
Has it come to this? As I read the newspaper accounts of the death of a tagger at the hands of a late-night stroller in Sun Valley, and the cheering that followed this act of violence, I have to ask: What happened to community? Listen to conversations about the incident and you hear people picking sides, glorifying or vilifying the tagger or the shooter, as if it were some kind of sporting match.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1995 | NORMAN MATLOFF, Norman Matloff teaches at UC Davis, where he was formerly chairman of the Affirmative Action Committee. and
Affirmative action is fast becoming one of the hot-button issues of 1995. The University of California Board of Regents has now joined the fray, announcing that it will re-examine affirmative action policies in UC admissions. Yet, affirmative action remains sound in concept, and could be handled sensibly. In particular, the regents would do well to consider a lottery-based admissions policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1994 | MIKE HUFFINGTON, Rep. Mike Huffington (R-Santa Barbara) ran against Sen. Dianne Feinstein for the U.S. Senate in November.
Nothing would be simpler than for me to concede defeat in the recent Senate race. And if it were only one Senate seat at stake, I might have taken the easy way out. After all, one of the main reasons I entered this race--the goal of a GOP Senate majority--has been achieved. But I believe that there is more than one Senate seat in the balance. At stake is the future of free elections in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1994 | RICHARD PEISER, Richard Peiser is director of the Lusk Center for Real Estate Development at USC. and
When the recriminations die down about how one of the richest, most conservative counties in the nation could have gone bankrupt, the question will remain: What do we do about it? People outside of Orange County may feel it made its own bed and deserves to lie in it--as the county would be expected to preach if another county went bankrupt. Liberals may protest the prospect of a government bailout for an area that perhaps most represented the opposition to such assistance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1994 | DANIEL H. LOWENSTEIN, Daniel H. Lowenstein, a professor of law at UCLA, specializes in election law.
Voters in November elected a majority of Republicans to both houses of Congress. As a result, control of both houses is passing in an orderly manner to the GOP. That's the way democracy is supposed to work in America. California voters elected Republicans in 41 out of 80 Assembly districts. When the Assembly convened last week, no one took control and all we got was chaos. That's not the way democracy is supposed to work. Who is to blame? Not Willie Brown and the Democrats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1994 | ROBERT GOTTLIEB and CAROLYN OLNEY and ELIZABETH RILEY, Robert Gottlieb supervised the "Seeds of Change" study. Elizabeth Riley and Carolyn Olney are the executive director and associate director of the Interfaith Hunger Coalition of Southern California. Gottlieb and Riley are members of the City of Los Angeles' Voluntary Advisory Council on Hunger
Today, a day to feast and give thanks, more people than at any time in the recent past are going hungry in Los Angeles. These are not only the homeless, not even just the unemployed or those on welfare. Today there are working people, retired people, illegal immigrants and native born, and children of all colors and from different communities who are not eating well or regularly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1994 | ART TORRES, State Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles), who was a candidate for state insurance commissioner, is chairman of the Insurance, Claims and Corporations Committee.
Take pause, California. Look around and reflect. We have many wounds to heal. The eyes of my 14-year-old daughter, Danielle, told the entire story on election night.
OPINION
October 23, 1994 | HAROLD W. EZELL, Harold W. Ezell, a co-author of Proposition 187, was commissioner of the INS' Western region from 1983 to 1989
The issue of illegal immigration is color-blind; it is not a racial but a legal issue. It is an issue that taxpayers, who have seen our tax dollars squandered on programs that have nothing to do with American citizens or legal aliens, understand. Each of us must ask ourselves: How many illegals can we educate, medicate, compensate and incarcerate before California goes bankrupt? Can we continue business as usual, wasting taxpayer dollars?
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