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California Condor

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said this week that it would not tolerate the harm or killing of an endangered California condor during construction of a proposed Newhall Ranch community of 60,000 residents along the Santa Clara River. In a long-awaited, 178-page opinion, the agency also said, however, that it would allow the developer to capture and relocate one condor during the next 25 years, if necessary, according to agency wildlife biologist Rick Farris. "We anticipate that there might be some occasion over the 25 years in which a California condor may become attracted to some human activity such as construction of a house," Farris said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt, Los Angeles Times
Pinnacles National Monument, a landscape of massive spires and sheer-walled canyons east of Salinas Valley, would become California's newest national park under legislation introduced in Congress recently. Rising out of the chaparral-swathed Gabilan Mountains in central California, the 26,000-acre area of volcanic rock formations is a nesting place for the endangered California condor, North America's largest soaring bird, with wingspans up to 9 feet. Pinnacles now gets about 165,000 visitors a year who are drawn by the condors, caves, challenging rock climbs and spectacular wildflowers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2009 | Associated Press
A California condor captured on the Central Coast because it appeared to be sick was not only suffering from lead poisoning but also had been shot, animal experts said Friday. Unable to eat on its own, the condor was under intensive care at the L.A. Zoo, and its prognosis was guarded, birds curator Susie Kasielke said. X-rays taken at the zoo showed shotgun pellets embedded in its flesh, Kasielke said. Those wounds had healed over, and it could not be determined when they occurred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2009 | Louis Sahagun
He was found dazed in a mountain bush in 1967, hanging upside down with an injured wing and smelling like rotten fish -- a rare male California condor, a fledgling member of a nearly extinct species. He was a wreck, and the ornithologists who found him in a canyon north of Ojai speculated that he was also emotionally troubled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2008 | Louis Sahagun, Sahagun is a Times staff writer.
A ban on hunting with lead ammunition within the California condor's 2,385-square-mile range will be expanded to prohibit its use in the shooting of small nuisance animals, according to a settlement announced Wednesday between environmentalists and state wildlife authorities. The Condor Preservation Act already forbids lead for killing big game such as deer, antelope, bear and bighorn sheep, and non-game species such as feral pigs and coyotes within their range.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2008 | Margot Roosevelt, Times Staff Writer
The California condor, rescued from extinction in an elaborate and expensive recovery effort, has become tantamount to a zoo animal in the wild and can't survive on its own without a ban on lead ammunition across its vast Western ranges, a scientific study has concluded. The majestic scavengers, bred in captivity and released to nature in recent decades, require "constant and costly human assistance," a blue-ribbon panel of the American Ornithologists' Union reported this week.
OPINION
May 12, 2008
Re "Homes, homes on the range," May 8 Construction of the sprawling Centennial and Tejon Mountain Ranch projects, 26,000 homes in three urban villages 100 miles north of downtown Los Angeles, spells jeopardy for the California condor and our regional environmental sustainability. Southern California must stop sprawling outward. It costs governments untold millions to serve the 70,000 or more drivers getting in line on Interstate 5 and to pay for new firefighters to protect the "village center" from being devoured in the next brush conflagration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2007 | George Skelton
Eons ago, when my brother and I were teens hunting in the mountains behind Ojai, we'd marvel at the giant birds soaring far overhead. They were California condors. Or maybe they were turkey vultures. We really didn't know. But we'd always say they were condors because that made us feel good, like it was a special event. This was prime condor country, after all, in the Los Padres National Forest.
OPINION
September 26, 2007
The gun lobby certainly knows how to take aim and fire. Unfortunately, this time the target is a partial ban on lead hunting ammunition, to give the California condor a better chance at survival. After years of dithering while the rare birds commonly showed overexposure to lead, the state this year appeared on the verge of requiring hunters to use non-lead ammunition in the condors' range.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2007 | From Times Staff Reports
The effort to restore the California condor to its native habitat has suffered a setback, San Diego Zoo officials announced Friday. The first condor chick hatched in Baja California since condors were reintroduced to the Sierra San Pedro de Martir National Park in 2002 has disappeared from the nest. The chick may have been killed by insects or snatched by a predator bird, officials said. It was the offspring of two condors released into the wild.
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