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California Department Of Alcoholic Beverage Control

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1993 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, which has been hobbled by budget cuts to the point of inaction, announced Thursday that investigators will return to the streets this month to crack down on liquor law violations. For nearly a year, ABC investigators across California have been processing a massive backlog in liquor license applications. But because of staffing shortages, they have not been conducting investigations of the state's 73,000 alcohol establishments.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1992 | JACK CHEEVERS
Gov. Pete Wilson has appointed former state Sen. Ed Davis (R-Santa Clarita) to the Alcoholic Beverage Control Appeals Board. Davis, 76, retired from the Senate earlier this month after 12 years and now lives in Morro Bay. He was chief of the Los Angeles Police Department from 1969 to 1978. The board hears appeals by holders of liquor licenses who have been disciplined by the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control. It also hears appeals from those who have been denied licenses.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with complaints from liquor retailers, the Wilson Administration has assigned Department of Motor Vehicles employees to help process alcoholic beverage licenses and reduce a staggering backlog produced by funding shortages.
NEWS
March 13, 1992 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of budget cuts that have reduced the number of state investigators by more than half, the Wilson Administration has curtailed efforts by the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to enforce liquor laws such as the prohibition of sales to minors, officials said Thursday. Administration officials said all remaining ABC enforcement officers are being shifted from policing activities to licensing to handle a growing backlog of applications for liquor licenses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1991 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Layoffs of three-fourths of the state investigators who monitor bars and liquor stores have been halted until at least January because of an administrative delay, giving a coalition of business and union leaders time to come up with a bailout plan. The California Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1991 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Cruz stood under a cone of light in the Los Sanchez Bar and Restaurant parking lot, unwinding after a night of policing local bars. Joining Anaheim police in a surprise sweep of the raucous bar, Cruz helped arrest four patrons on suspicion of drug use, public drunkenness and carrying a concealed weapon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1991 | ERIC YOUNG
Assemblyman Tom Umberg (D-Garden Grove) joined local law enforcement officials Thursday in denouncing plans to lay off a majority of state liquor law enforcement agents this month, saying that fewer agents in Orange County would lead to lax oversight of liquor sales. Nearly three quarters of the investigators for the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, including 10 of 13 in Orange County, are scheduled to be laid off as part of Gov. Pete Wilson's plan to close a $14.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1991 | JOHN SCHWADA and RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Assemblyman Richard Katz (D-Sylmar) on Wednesday urged community activists to protest vigorously against state budget cuts blamed for the impending layoff of 75% of the investigators who monitor sales of alcoholic beverages. "We have to make a lot more noise or the governor's not going to get a message," said Katz, who with another legislator held a hearing near Skid Row in downtown Los Angeles to consider the impact of the cuts, which are set to go into effect Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1991 | JOHN SCHWADA and RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At the Blue Bird Market on Los Angeles' downtown Skid Row, customers in grimy clothes enter a caged alcove, push money at the cashier through wrought-iron bars and call out the name of the fortified wine of their choice. With their bottles of Cisco or Thunderbird in hand, the customers face danger as they leave. During a 30-month period, 71 thefts and robberies occurred at the cheerless market on South Main Street, and in many cases it was the customers who were victims.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1991 | DANIEL AKST
Two items in the newspapers last week deserve to be read side by side. First, attorneys for Vertigo, the trendy downtown Los Angeles nightspot that openly discriminates against the attire-impaired, are appealing efforts by the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to force the club to admit nerds. Vertigo makes no bones about sorting the stodgy from the chic. A guy at the door eyeballs supplicants eager for entry and makes the decision based entirely on their clothes.
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