Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCalifornia Department Of Education
IN THE NEWS

California Department Of Education

NEWS
February 16, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
California Department of Education officials acknowledged Tuesday that a widely reported statewide ranking that compared the test scores of schools with similar student demographics was faulty, primarily because of poor data provided by school districts. In a letter to superintendents dated Monday, the department noted that about 400 schools have contacted state officials to request that their rankings alongside similar schools be recomputed.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2001 | RICHARD WINTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Department of Education has determined that adults apparently altered students' standardized test results in two classes at a Pasadena elementary school to improve the scores, district officials said Thursday. An analysis of test answers at Willard Elementary School showed an unusually high number of erasures on items where answers had been changed from wrong to right, school officials said. Interim Supt.
NEWS
July 22, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Department of Education mismanaged $21 million in federal funds earmarked to teach English to poor immigrants, according to a new state audit. Instead, the Bureau of State Audits report concludes, the department gave funds year after year to organizations that had "abysmal" records for reaching and successfully teaching students. Organizations examined in the audit are located across the state, from the Bay Area to the Central Valley to Southern California.
NEWS
March 12, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The California Department of Education has yanked information from its Internet site that ranked schools against others with similar characteristics, acknowledging that data used to compute the rankings were more extensively flawed than the agency had realized. Doug Stone, an agency spokesman, emphasized Friday that schools' raw scores on the state's first Academic Performance Index and the 1-to-10 statewide rankings of schools were not affected by the data problems.
NEWS
March 1, 2001 | NEDRA RHONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rate of crimes against people--including battery and sexual offenses--increased 17% last year in California schools, according to a report released by the state Department of Education on Wednesday. Rates of weapons possession, bombings, bomb threats, loitering, drug and alcohol sales and burglary decreased. But rates of all other crimes either held steady or rose on campuses throughout the state, the annual school crime report said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1992 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County high schools have made significant progress in their battle against the dropout rate in the past six years, boasting fewer dropouts in the class of 1991 than the average California school district, officials said Thursday. Statistics released by the state Department of Education showed that in Orange County, 15.5% of the class of 1991 left school without graduating, compared to a statewide average of 18.2%.
NEWS
July 1, 1998 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN and NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California's English-speaking students performed at roughly the national average on standardized tests of reading and mathematics in lower grades, but reading performance sank badly in high schools, according to a summary of results released Tuesday. The summary of scores on the Stanford 9 test issued by the Department of Education excluded the 1 in 5 California test takers classified as limited English-speaking. A court ruling has blocked release of those scores.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1997 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a frantic year of hiring additional teachers and building more classroom space, some Orange County districts ultimately did not meet their original plans and are receiving far less from the state than they had estimated--in one case, more than $1 million less.
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
About 300 low-ranked schools that showed extraordinary gains in Stanford 9 scores will divide up a $100-million state pot designed to reward teachers and principals, according to a list unveiled Thursday by the California Department of Education. Those schools represent fewer than one-quarter of the 1,346 schools statewide that met the criteria for the big-money rewards--which has generated consternation among critics of the governor's award program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2007 | Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
The California Department of Education has alerted 99 school districts, including Los Angeles Unified, that they are in danger of being abolished, taken over or stripped of administrators and schools under their jurisdiction. But whether these and other harsh measures will come to pass is questionable at best. Under the federal No Child Left Behind law, state officials have not adopted severe punishments against school districts, and they appear reluctant now.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|