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California Department Of Education

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
New laptop computers. Kid-friendly furniture. Books for classroom libraries. White boards to replace dusty blackboards. These are among the myriad ways that California public schools plan to spend the $227 million in taxpayer-funded rewards that will soon begin flowing under Gov. Gray Davis' school accountability program. Today, the California Department of Education will post on its Web site the list of 4,502 schools that will receive this windfall, along with the amount each will get.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2000 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The state Department of Education began a review Thursday of what to do about seven Los Angeles schools, including Palisades Charter High School, that were left off the statewide Academic Performance Index in an apparent mix-up over their classification as "alternative" schools. A state official said it may be two weeks before the department decides whether to grant the request of the Los Angeles Unified School District to include the schools in the new accountability system.
NEWS
February 16, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
California Department of Education officials acknowledged Tuesday that a widely reported statewide ranking that compared the academic performance of schools with similar ethnic and economic characteristics was faulty, primarily because of poor data provided by school districts. In a letter to superintendents dated Monday, the department noted that about 400 schools have contacted state officials to request that their rankings alongside similar schools be recomputed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2007 | Adrian G. Uribarri, Times Staff Writer
At first they didn't succeed, so they tried, tried again. Of about 40,000 students who failed the mandatory California High School Exit Examination last year, about 45% have enrolled for a fifth year of high school or an adult education program, according to new figures from the California Department of Education. About 4,800 passed after taking the test once more. The data also show that this year's class of graduating seniors has a pass rate of 91.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
About 300 low-ranked schools that showed extraordinary gains in Stanford 9 scores will divvy up a $100-million state pot to reward teachers and principals, according to a list released Thursday by the California Department of Education. Because so many schools did well and the pot of money is fixed, those top 300 schools represent less than one-quarter of the 1,346 schools statewide that met the criteria.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1997 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
When it comes to the sensitive issue of selecting textbooks, state education officials try to walk a fine line between making sure that books purchased are not offensive and giving local districts as much leeway as possible to make their own choices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1998 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state audit committee assailed the California Department of Education on Thursday for approving the purchase of at least nine Los Angeles school sites despite suspicions that the soil on the properties was polluted by industrial chemicals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1999 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The long-elusive goal of putting detailed measures of school performance into an easy to understand form, available to everyone, at last may be in reach. A plethora of data--from test scores to the percentage of teachers lacking credentials--can now be found on the Internet for every school in California. Principally it comes from the California Basic Educational Data System, which is posted on the state Department of Education's Web site.
NEWS
January 24, 2000 | GEORGE SKELTON
A dramatic new chapter in California school reform begins Tuesday. And other than schools, home sales may feel the biggest impact. Real estate agents should benefit along with school kids. For the first time, practically every public school will be rated on a scale of 1 to 10--one meaning wretched, 10 denoting near-perfection. From bottom-of-the-barrel to as-good-as-it-gets. Pretty simple.
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