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California Department Of Managed Health Care

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BUSINESS
August 29, 2007 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
Eight months after pledging to put the brakes on retroactive cancellations of individual health insurance policies, the state agency that regulates HMOs said Tuesday that new rules were taking longer than anticipated because of the variety of health plans involved. Cindy Ehnes, director of the California Department of Managed Health Care, pledged in December to introduce regulations aimed at stopping most retroactive cancellations of individual coverage. The department held a public hearing Jan.
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BUSINESS
December 30, 2007 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
At 13, David Denney's body functions like that of a baby. Severe brain damage halted his motor development at 4 months. Unable to walk, sit up, speak or even eat by mouth, David is cared for by a licensed vocational nurse who feeds him formula through a stomach tube, watching closely in case he retches. Blue Cross of California, the family's health plan, paid for the nurse for most of David's life at a cost of about $1,200 a week.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2001 | BENEDICT CAREY, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Using a new consumer protection law, state regulators since Jan. 1 have sent nearly 200 disputes between HMOs and patients to an independent medical review board, which has ruled in favor of the health plans 65% of the time, according to new state figures. Consumers can sue HMOs if they are dissatisfied with the review process. But state officials, consumer advocates and plaintiffs' lawyers said they are unaware of any such lawsuits since Jan. 1.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2007 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
The state stepped into a bitter battle Thursday between Blue Cross of California and the doctors, hospitals and medical labs that serve about 700,000 people covered by the state's largest health plan. At issue is the contentious financial relationship between medical providers and Blue Cross, which the state's top HMO regulator warned might worsen the plight of California's struggling hospitals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2001 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Kaiser Permanente, the state's largest HMO, and the fledgling California Department of Managed Health Care are butting heads in a case that tests regulators' ability to penalize health plans for alleged lapses in patient care. In short, the state claims that Kaiser has not assessed and treated ill patients in a timely manner, which it says contributed to the deaths of three people. Kaiser denies problems with its facilities and is seeking, in both state and federal proceedings, to overturn a $1.
HEALTH
July 30, 2001 | BENEDICT CAREY, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
One is a new mother whose infant son requires around-the-clock medical attention. The other is a retired police officer who needs a specialist nearby to help treat a chronic illness. Like millions of Americans across the country who have had disputes with their HMOs, these two Californians had neither the energy, the time, nor the willingness to pursue a lawsuit. They simply wanted their problems to be fixed.
NEWS
May 2, 1998 | From Associated Press
Following through on a promise he made in January, Gov. Pete Wilson announced plans Friday to create a new state Department of Managed Health Care and abolish the Department of Corporations, which currently oversees managed care businesses.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2007 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
State regulators Monday postponed a hearing originally set for this week on complaints against Blue Cross of California, because its parent company has requested a more detailed agenda. The hearing now is set for Aug. 7 in Los Angeles. The state Department of Managed Health Care, which oversees HMOs, said last week that it had received more than 1,600 complaints from policyholders and doctors in less than three years against Blue Cross, the state's largest health insurer.
BUSINESS
May 26, 2007 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
State regulators are investigating whether a $950-million dividend Blue Cross of California sent to its Indianapolis-based parent violates an agreement the companies made to limit such payments to keep premiums down and maintain the quality of healthcare benefits, officials said Friday. Officials said the parent, healthcare giant WellPoint Inc., should have taken no more than $141 million out of California.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2007 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
At 13, David Denney's body functions like that of a baby. Severe brain damage halted his motor development at 4 months. Unable to walk, sit up, speak or even eat by mouth, David is cared for by a licensed vocational nurse who feeds him formula through a stomach tube, watching closely in case he retches. Blue Cross of California, the family's health plan, paid for the nurse for most of David's life at a cost of about $1,200 a week.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2007 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
Eight months after pledging to put the brakes on retroactive cancellations of individual health insurance policies, the state agency that regulates HMOs said Tuesday that new rules were taking longer than anticipated because of the variety of health plans involved. Cindy Ehnes, director of the California Department of Managed Health Care, pledged in December to introduce regulations aimed at stopping most retroactive cancellations of individual coverage. The department held a public hearing Jan.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2007 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
State regulators Monday postponed a hearing originally set for this week on complaints against Blue Cross of California, because its parent company has requested a more detailed agenda. The hearing now is set for Aug. 7 in Los Angeles. The state Department of Managed Health Care, which oversees HMOs, said last week that it had received more than 1,600 complaints from policyholders and doctors in less than three years against Blue Cross, the state's largest health insurer.
BUSINESS
May 26, 2007 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
State regulators are investigating whether a $950-million dividend Blue Cross of California sent to its Indianapolis-based parent violates an agreement the companies made to limit such payments to keep premiums down and maintain the quality of healthcare benefits, officials said Friday. Officials said the parent, healthcare giant WellPoint Inc., should have taken no more than $141 million out of California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2001 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Kaiser Permanente, the state's largest HMO, and the fledgling California Department of Managed Health Care are butting heads in a case that tests regulators' ability to penalize health plans for alleged lapses in patient care. In short, the state claims that Kaiser has not assessed and treated ill patients in a timely manner, which it says contributed to the deaths of three people. Kaiser denies problems with its facilities and is seeking, in both state and federal proceedings, to overturn a $1.
HEALTH
July 30, 2001 | BENEDICT CAREY, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
One is a new mother whose infant son requires around-the-clock medical attention. The other is a retired police officer who needs a specialist nearby to help treat a chronic illness. Like millions of Americans across the country who have had disputes with their HMOs, these two Californians had neither the energy, the time, nor the willingness to pursue a lawsuit. They simply wanted their problems to be fixed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2001 | BENEDICT CAREY, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Using a new consumer protection law, state regulators since Jan. 1 have sent nearly 200 disputes between HMOs and patients to an independent medical review board, which has ruled in favor of the health plans 65% of the time, according to new state figures. Consumers can sue HMOs if they are dissatisfied with the review process. But state officials, consumer advocates and plaintiffs' lawyers said they are unaware of any such lawsuits since Jan. 1.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2007 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
The state stepped into a bitter battle Thursday between Blue Cross of California and the doctors, hospitals and medical labs that serve about 700,000 people covered by the state's largest health plan. At issue is the contentious financial relationship between medical providers and Blue Cross, which the state's top HMO regulator warned might worsen the plight of California's struggling hospitals.
NEWS
May 2, 1998 | From Associated Press
Following through on a promise he made in January, Gov. Pete Wilson announced plans Friday to create a new state Department of Managed Health Care and abolish the Department of Corporations, which currently oversees managed care businesses.
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