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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Minority and low-income women in Los Angeles County are more likely to have limited access to healthcare and to struggle with chronic diseases, according to a new report by the county Department of Public Health. The report, "Health Indicators for Women in Los Angeles County," was released last week by the Office of Women's Health and the Office of Health Assessment & Epidemiology. Among the findings: African American women were far more likely to suffer from sexually transmitted diseases, including AIDS, and to die from chronic illnesses.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Ten California hospitals received fines Thursday for errors that resulted in either serious injury or death to a patient. The California Department of Public Health issued a total of $785,000 in penalties for errors that include removing the wrong kidney, leaving surgical objects behind and failing to call for assistance when a patient began bleeding excessively. The civil fines, ranging from $10,000 to $100,000, were issued to hospitals throughout the state for errors that occurred in 2010 and 2011.
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BUSINESS
June 25, 2009 | W.J. Hennigan
A Culver City company's alfalfa sprouts were recalled Wednesday by the California Department of Public Health because of possible salmonella contamination. Agency Director Mark Horton warned consumers not to eat certain Kowalke Organics alfalfa products with sell-by dates June 18 to June 30. The items were sold at Southern California Gelson's and Whole Foods Market grocery stores.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
State regulators have fined six Southern California hospitals for healthcare violations that included an emergency room nurse's sexual assault on a patient at Chapman Medical Center in Orange. The penalties, announced Friday by the California Department of Public Health, included the eighth assessed on Southwest Healthcare System in Murrieta, which has been fined more often than any other hospital in the state since financial penalties were adopted in 2007. Southwest's latest administrative fine of $100,000, the largest the state can impose, involved a nurse's failure to recognize and take emergency action to deal with signs of fetal distress during a patient's labor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
State regulators have fined six Southern California hospitals for healthcare violations that included an emergency room nurse's sexual assault on a patient at Chapman Medical Center in Orange. The penalties, announced Friday by the California Department of Public Health, included the eighth assessed on Southwest Healthcare System in Murrieta, which has been fined more often than any other hospital in the state since financial penalties were adopted in 2007. Southwest's latest administrative fine of $100,000, the largest the state can impose, involved a nurse's failure to recognize and take emergency action to deal with signs of fetal distress during a patient's labor.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2010 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The California Department of Public Health has reversed its earlier finding that the Motion Picture and Television Fund broke state law when the charity transferred dozens of residents out of its nursing home. The department said this month that the fund had been at fault for not issuing to more than 30 residents notices informing them of their rights, including the option to appeal the decision to relocate them. Fund administrators appealed, however, maintaining that the relocations were voluntary and didn't require the notices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Special to the Times
Dr. Lester Breslow, the UCLA researcher who became known as "Mr. Public Health" because of his research emphasizing the beneficial effects of avoiding certain behaviors, such as smoking, overeating and failing to exercise regularly, has died. He was 97. Breslow, a former director of the California Department of Public Health and dean of UCLA's Fielding School of Public Health, died Monday at his home in Los Angeles, the university announced. Breslow played a key role in medicine's transition from an emphasis on simply treating disease to a much broader effort to prevent it. Medicine focused "almost exclusively on communicable diseases when I started" in the 1940s, he recently recalled.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2010 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
In a rebuke of the Motion Picture and Television Fund, state inspectors concluded that fund administrators violated state law when they transferred dozens of residents out of the charity's beleaguered nursing home last year. The California Department of Public Health said in a recent report that nursing-home managers did not issue 30-day discharge notices to more than 30 residents who left the nursing home informing them of their rights, including the option to appeal the decision to relocate them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2011
After reports that a dangerous drug-resistant bacterium, carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae , or CRKP, had spread to at least 356 patients in Southern California last year, Times staff writer Molly Hennessy-Fiske spoke with Dr. Kavita Trivedi, medical epidemiologist with the California Department of Public Health's Antimicrobial Stewardship Program Initiative, about what can be done to reduce the spread of such drug-resistant "superbugs....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Ten California hospitals received fines Thursday for errors that resulted in either serious injury or death to a patient. The California Department of Public Health issued a total of $785,000 in penalties for errors that include removing the wrong kidney, leaving surgical objects behind and failing to call for assistance when a patient began bleeding excessively. The civil fines, ranging from $10,000 to $100,000, were issued to hospitals throughout the state for errors that occurred in 2010 and 2011.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Special to the Times
Dr. Lester Breslow, the UCLA researcher who became known as "Mr. Public Health" because of his research emphasizing the beneficial effects of avoiding certain behaviors, such as smoking, overeating and failing to exercise regularly, has died. He was 97. Breslow, a former director of the California Department of Public Health and dean of UCLA's Fielding School of Public Health, died Monday at his home in Los Angeles, the university announced. Breslow played a key role in medicine's transition from an emphasis on simply treating disease to a much broader effort to prevent it. Medicine focused "almost exclusively on communicable diseases when I started" in the 1940s, he recently recalled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2011
After reports that a dangerous drug-resistant bacterium, carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae , or CRKP, had spread to at least 356 patients in Southern California last year, Times staff writer Molly Hennessy-Fiske spoke with Dr. Kavita Trivedi, medical epidemiologist with the California Department of Public Health's Antimicrobial Stewardship Program Initiative, about what can be done to reduce the spread of such drug-resistant "superbugs....
BUSINESS
August 27, 2010 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The California Department of Public Health has reversed its earlier finding that the Motion Picture and Television Fund broke state law when the charity transferred dozens of residents out of its nursing home. The department said this month that the fund had been at fault for not issuing to more than 30 residents notices informing them of their rights, including the option to appeal the decision to relocate them. Fund administrators appealed, however, maintaining that the relocations were voluntary and didn't require the notices.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2010 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
In a rebuke of the Motion Picture and Television Fund, state inspectors concluded that fund administrators violated state law when they transferred dozens of residents out of the charity's beleaguered nursing home last year. The California Department of Public Health said in a recent report that nursing-home managers did not issue 30-day discharge notices to more than 30 residents who left the nursing home informing them of their rights, including the option to appeal the decision to relocate them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Minority and low-income women in Los Angeles County are more likely to have limited access to healthcare and to struggle with chronic diseases, according to a new report by the county Department of Public Health. The report, "Health Indicators for Women in Los Angeles County," was released last week by the Office of Women's Health and the Office of Health Assessment & Epidemiology. Among the findings: African American women were far more likely to suffer from sexually transmitted diseases, including AIDS, and to die from chronic illnesses.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2009 | W.J. Hennigan
A Culver City company's alfalfa sprouts were recalled Wednesday by the California Department of Public Health because of possible salmonella contamination. Agency Director Mark Horton warned consumers not to eat certain Kowalke Organics alfalfa products with sell-by dates June 18 to June 30. The items were sold at Southern California Gelson's and Whole Foods Market grocery stores.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
Radiation detected off the U.S. West Coast from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan has declined since the 2011 tsunami disaster and never approached levels that could pose a risk to human health, seafood or wildlife, scientists say. Experts have been trying to dispel worries stemming from a burst of online videos and blog posts in recent months that contend radiation from Fukushima is contaminating beaches and seafood and harming sea...
BUSINESS
September 27, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Food and Drug Administration and state health authorities warned consumers Friday not to eat any flavors of White Rabbit candy imported from China because they may be contaminated with the chemical melamine. The California Department of Public Health specifically identified White Rabbit candies imported and distributed by Queensway Foods Co. of Burlingame, Calif. Queensway is voluntarily recalling the chewy sweets after state testing detected melamine in some pieces.
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