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California Education

NEWS
February 4, 1996 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After losing two of their last three bids to win more money for state colleges and universities, California's higher education leaders have finally learned a lesson long taught by former U.S. House Speaker Thomas "Tip" O'Neill, who made famous the phrase: "All politics is local."
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NEWS
April 26, 1991 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In the middle of the state's escalating fiscal crisis, officials of a university-based think tank on Thursday stepped up their efforts to see that California's bursting schools--targeted for deep cuts to help balance the budget--get more money eventually. "We need to add $2 billion per year" to stay even with the rapid growth in the state's school population projected through at least the end of the decade, said Allan R.
NEWS
December 9, 1988
Spurred by record ticket sales thus far in fiscal year 1988-89, California State Lottery officials said they will transfer about $235 million to public education, the largest first-quarter transfer in the lottery's three-year history. The $235 million equates to an average daily attendance figure of about $41 per student for the quarter and significantly exceeds first-quarter transfers for previous fiscal years--$109 million in 1986-87 and $139 million in 1987-88.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1997
Rising college costs are placing a greater burden than ever on California students and their families, despite the state's improving economy, the California Higher Education Policy Center reports. Examining trends in student aid over a six-year period, the San Jose-based research group found that the share of family income needed to pay college fees was much higher in 1996 than in 1990.
NEWS
October 13, 1990 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stormy meeting that intensified the battle over control of California education policy, the State Board of Education on Friday voted to hire its own lawyer to resolve conflicts with State Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig.
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Calling for specific solutions to "very complicated" problems, California Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig on Tuesday convened a two-day conference to find ways of improving the state's--and the nation's--schools. An outgrowth of the historic national "education summit" of 49 governors convened by President Bush last fall, California's conference brought together more than 300 educators, business leaders and legislators.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Third-graders should learn about the periodic table of elements. Fifth-graders should know the properties of common solids, liquids and gases. And high school students should master Newton's first, second and third laws of motion. Those are three of hundreds of new standards the State Board of Education adopted Friday for what students should be taught in science.
NEWS
February 24, 1988 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
The current level of state spending for public schools will do little more than ensure continued educational mediocrity, according to an analysis released Tuesday by an independent group of education professors from the state's top universities. With enrollment statewide growing 42% above what had been projected for this year, the state needs to provide an extra $20.
NEWS
August 20, 1998 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cashing in on the state's rebounding economy, Gov. Pete Wilson signed a number of bills Wednesday that will provide millions of dollars annually to students in the form of new textbooks, a longer school year, better teacher training and an improved after-school program. "Right now, California is enjoying good economic times--it's the envy of the rest of the nation," Wilson told a group of youngsters at Alta Loma Elementary School in the Mid-City area of Los Angeles.
NEWS
August 19, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a mound of new money awaiting California community colleges this school year, many campuses have fresh leadership, and the public appears more willing to part with tax dollars for education. As classes begin this week, however, at least two sticky questions face college officials and students: Will California's long-awaited economic upswing last long enough to erase years of budget cuts and the ensuing enrollment drops?
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