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California Elections 1996

NEWS
November 7, 1996 | DAN MORAIN and ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In their lopsided approval of Proposition 218, California voters gave the go-ahead to the most significant tax-cutting initiative in a decade, prompting local officials statewide Wednesday to warn that services from libraries to police could be cut. In Los Angeles, City Councilwoman Jackie Goldberg called for the city to file a lawsuit to have the initiative, which restricts the ability of local governments to increase or impose general taxes, declared unconstitutional.
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NEWS
November 7, 1996 | MARK GLADSTONE and CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Democrats on Wednesday were savoring a surprisingly strong election comeback in the state Legislature, where they strengthened their 25-year dominance in the Senate and edged out Republican Speaker Curt Pringle to narrowly recapture the Assembly. Even with some races still up in the air, Democrats were talking about extending an olive branch to Republican Gov.
NEWS
November 7, 1996 | DAVID FERRELL and DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Call him one of the, ah, grass-roots campaigners. He sings and tells jokes for pocket change. His sign--"World's Greatest Wino"--features a bumper sticker supporting Proposition 215, in no small part because Clarence Bobby Brown has been treating himself with pot for some time now. "I'm nearly blind," Brown, 59, said Wednesday on the Venice boardwalk, proudly sporting an "I voted" sticker. "Therapeutic purposes is what I use marijuana for. When I want to get high, this is what I use."
NEWS
November 6, 1996 | PETER H. KING
It was less than a week before the election. The candidate stood just outside the supermarket door, passing out pamphlets. She was little, she was old, and she was, it seemed, someone who would not take offense at being called a lady. All she lacked to complete the cliche were tennis shoes. "Hi," she said shyly, sticking out her hand. "Hi," I said back. "I'm running for state Assembly," she said. "Well, good luck to you!" I placed her pamphlet in the grocery bag and forgot about it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1996 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democrat Lou Correa burst from obscurity Tuesday to pull nearly even in early returns with incumbent Assemblyman Jim Morrissey, providing the only possibility for an upset in a likely Republican sweep of nine county legislative contests. As county Democrats held their breath, Correa, a little-known financial consultant and political neophyte, inched closer to the 66-year-old Santa Ana lawmaker in the heavily Latino 69th Assembly District.
NEWS
November 6, 1996 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an upstart campaign that drew the wrath of law enforcement, Californians bucked years of demonizing marijuana and voted yes Tuesday to legalize use of the drug for medical treatment. Although Proposition 215 was criticized as the wrong message during America's war against drugs, and full of loopholes to boot, a majority of voters saw it differently in this big surprise. "Doonesbury won the election!" joked Loyola law professor Laurie Levenson, a former federal prosecutor.
NEWS
November 6, 1996 | BILL STALL and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Proposition 209, the anti-affirmative action measure that sharply divided Californians with clashing images of civil rights leaders and ex-Klansman David Duke, won voters' approval late Tuesday. With half the votes counted, Proposition 209, a constitutional amendment that would eliminate government-sponsored affirmative action programs, was winning by 13%. In fact, Californians were voting favorably on an extraordinary number of ballot propositions.
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